creative writing fellowship

Stanford University

Wallace Stegner Fellowship

*The application for the 2024-2026 fellowship is now closed. Applications for the 2025-2027 fellowship will open on September 1 and close on November 1.*

For application updates, join our Stegner Fellowship email list

Unique among writing programs, Stanford University offers 10 two-year fellowships each year, 5 in fiction and 5 in poetry. All the fellows in each genre convene weekly in a 3-hour workshop with faculty.

Stegner Fellows are regarded as working artists, intent upon practicing and perfecting their craft. The only requirements are writing and workshop attendance. The fellowship offers no degree. We view it as more  of an artist-in-residence opportunity for promising writers to spend two years developing their writing in the company of peers and under the guidance of Stanford  faculty .

In awarding fellowships, we consider the quality of the candidate’s creative work, potential for growth, and ability to contribute to and profit from our writing workshops. Our fellows are diverse in style and experience, with talent and seriousness the true common denominators.

  • We do not require any degrees or tests for admission
  • No school of writing is favored over any other
  • Applicants must be at least 18 years old

The Stegner Fellowship is a full-time academic commitment and is not intended to be pursued concurrently with another degree program. The fellowship includes a living stipend, and a fellow's tuition and health insurance are paid for by the Creative Writing Program. A f ellow must live close enough to Stanford in order to attend workshops, readings, and events.

At a Glance

  • 2-year fellowship; admissions are staggered so there are 10 first year fellows and 10 second year fellows at Stanford each year
  • Fellows must write and attend a 3-hour weekly workshop
  • Workshop coincides with Stanford's  academic calendar ; fellows have the summer off to work, write, or travel
  • Though similar in some ways to a MFA program, the fellowship does not offer a degree
  • Includes a $50,000 living stipend
  • Applications are available to all who are interested; all applicants are notified of fellowship decisions in April

Application window: opens on September 1 and closes on November 1 at 11:59 pm PST (November 2 at 2:59 am EST)

Eligibility

Anyone interested in the Stegner Fellowship is welcome to apply! Prior book publication is not required; note that prior publication may suggest a career that has advanced beyond the point when the fellowship’s instruction and workshop critique are most useful in a writer's development.

Yes. Anyone may apply, regardless of nationality. If accepted, you’re considered at Stanford to be a non-matriculated graduate student for visa purposes. We’ll work with you to obtain a J-1 visa.

Fellows must be 18 years old when they start the fellowship. Historically, we have accepted people as young as 22 and as old as 75.

Responsibilities

Primarily, Stegner Fellows are required to attend weekly, faculty-led workshops and to write, revise, and then write again, with the goal of a finished manuscript ready for publication. As part of the workshop, fellows are expected to actively engage with their cohort's work by reading and thoughtfully commenting on pieces presented.

However, to enrich one’s fellowship experience, we encourage all fellows to attend various reading events and lecture series hosted by our program. In the past, we’ve enjoyed the presence of guest speakers such as Zadie Smith, David Treuer, Gilbert King, Mary Ruefle, and Hilton Als. We also host public readings and colloquiums for our annual visiting poet-in-residence and visiting writer-in-residence .

During the first year of their fellowship, the fellows participate in the  Stegner Fellow Reading series , where they give a public reading of their work. It’s also possible for fellows to TA undergraduate courses, facilitate writing workshops, and offer special tutorials and independent studies to our undergraduate students.

Yes, one must live close enough to the Stanford main campus to attend weekly workshops, as well as readings and lectures by the program's visiting poets and writers.

The purpose of the fellowship is to give writers as much time as possible to work on their writing, free from the time constraints of full-time employment. Holding a full-time job during the fellowship runs counter to the intention of the program.

The fellowship is a 2-year program and includes a living stipend of $50,000 per academic year. Our program also pays for each fellow’s tuition and health insurance.

The Bay Area is a very expensive place to live. Realistically, an individual needs some form of supplemental income, which commonly means working during the summer.

Sometimes. Teaching appointments are not guaranteed, as priority goes to Ph.D. students who need the experience for their degree.

If you have questions about our fellowship, there are several ways to get answers:

  • Peruse our Application FAQ page
  • Email us at stegnerfellowship [at] stanford.edu (stegnerfellowship[at]stanford[dot]edu)
  • Or visit us in our main office: Margaret Jacks Hall (Building 460), Room 223

Thank you for your interest in the Wallace Stegner Fellowship!

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Fellowships

Fellowships opportunities for writers.

The Writer’s Center has developed a list of writing fellowships for your reference.

Please note that this page is a reference for writers. We do not partner with the following organizations. Also, these opportunities are subject to change, so be sure to visit the websites for more information.

The Writer’s Center Compass Fellowship

What it is: Our renewed fellowship program will introduce a new writer each year to our writing family, to help guide them along the next steps on their path, with $1000 in credits toward any TWC workshops within a two-year period, a $300 cash stipend, and more.

Who’s it for: Applicants must be local in the DMV area and be able to travel to Bethesda.

The Writer’s Center says: If you’re a writer or an aspiring writer looking for where to go next, The Writer’s Center Compass Fellowship is a great place to start!

National Endowment for the Arts Creative Writing Fellowships

What it is: The National Endowment for the Arts Creative Writing Fellowships offer $25,000 grants in fiction, creative nonfiction, and poetry to enable creative writers to set aside time for writing, research, travel, and general career advancement.

Who’s it for: To be eligible, you have to be a citizen of the United States, you can’t have received two or more fellowships from the National Endowment from the Arts, you can’t have received the creative writing fellowship on or after January 1, 2014, and you must have published a book within the last seven years.

The Writer’s Center says : This is the nationally recognized fellowship that writers are vying for every year. Note that the genres alternate each year, with prose fellowships offered in odd years, and poetry fellowships in even years.

Mother Jones’s Ben Bagdikian Fellowship

What it is: Mother Jones offers an annual fellowship program that is “a crash course in investigative journalism.” The Ben Bagdikian Fellowship is a full-time position lasting approximately one year, beginning on the first Monday in December and running through late November. Fellows receive a $3,250 monthly stipend.

Who’s it for: Those who are still in school or are only available part-time are not eligible, nor can fellowships be used for course credit. Because the first two weeks of the fellowship consist of intensive group trainings, all applicants, without exception, must be prepared to start on the first Monday in December. Mother Jones is not able to furnish work visas for applicants from outside the United States.

The Writer’s Center says : This is a demanding position that will enable participants to get significant experience in investigative journalism.

Provincetown Fine Arts Center Fellowship

What it is: The Provincetown Fine Arts Center offers 20 seven-month residencies each year to emerging visual artists, fiction writers, and poets, each of whom receive an apartment, a studio (for visual artists), and a monthly stipend of $1,000 plus an exist stipend. Residencies run from October 1 through April 30.

Who’s it for: Visual artists, fiction writers, and poets.

The Writer’s Center says : This is one of the only non-MFA programs that support writers and artists for more than a month at a time.

The Kenyon Review Fellowship

What it is: The Kenyon Review offers a two-year fellowship that comes with a $35,000+ stipend and health benefits that will enable the fellow to undertake a significant writing project; teach one class per semester in the English department of Kenyon College; assist with creative and editorial projects for the Kenyon Review ; and participate in the cultural life of Kenyon College.

Who’s it for: Applicants must possess an MFA or PhD in creative writing, English literature, or comparative literature. They must have experience teaching creative writing and/or literature at the undergraduate level.

The Writer’s Center says : This is a fantastic opportunity for early-career writers to receive time and space to write, as well as teaching experience.

The Loft’s McKnight Artist Fellowship

What it is: The Loft presents five $25,000 awards annually to accomplished Minnesota writers and spoken word artists. Four awards alternate annually between creative prose (fiction and creative nonfiction) and poetry/spoken word. The fifth award is presented in children’s literature and alternates annually for writing for ages eight and under and writing for children older than eight.

Who’s it for: Applicants must have been legal residents of Minnesota for the 12 months prior to the application deadline and must currently reside in Minnesota.

The Writer’s Center says : This is a generous grant that will enable Minnesota writers to produce more creative work.

Bucknell Stadler Fellowship

What it is: Bucknell University offers a 10-month fellowship that provides a stipend of at least $33,000 and health insurance. The program offers two distinct tracks: one a fellowship in literary editing and a fellowship in literary arts administration . Applicants can apply to one or the other. Both fellowships are designed to balance the development of professional skills with time to complete a first book of poems. Fellows serve for 20 hours each week during the academic year. The balance of the fellows’ time is reserved for writing.

Who’s it for: Poets who have recently received an MFA or MA in poetry.

The Writer’s Center says : If you are an early career poet and you aren’t interested in teaching, this is a noteworthy opportunity to get significant experience with literary arts administration or literary editing while receiving time and space to work on a poetry collection.

Nieman Fellowships

What it is: Each year, the Nieman Foundation awards paid fellowships of $75,000 to up to 24 journalists working in print, broadcast, digital, and audiovisual media. Those selected for the program spend two full semesters at Harvard auditing classes; they are also able to audit classes at other local universities including MIT and Tufts. The Nieman Foundation also provides some financial support for health insurance and childcare. Fellows are not eligible for health care insurance through Harvard University.

Who’s it for: All applicants for Nieman Fellowships must be working journalists with at least five years of full-time media experience. During the two years prior to applying, an applicant should not have participated in a fellowship lasting four months or longer.

The Writer’s Center says : This is a generous fellowship that enables journalists to deepen their knowledge in an area of interest or several areas of interest.

James Jones Fellowship

What it is: The James Jones First Novel Fellowship, in the amount of $10,000, is awarded annually to an American writer of a novel-in-progress who has not previously published a novel. The Fellowship is co-sponsored by the James Jones Literary Society and the Maslow Family Graduate Program in Creative Writing of Wilkes University.

Who’s it for: An American writer who has never published a novel. This includes self-published novels.

The Writer’s Center says : This award provides invaluable monetary support for novelists with a work in progress.

The Hodder Fellowship

What it is: The Hodder Fellowship will be given to artists and writers of exceptional promise to pursue independent projects at Princeton University during the academic year. An $86,000 stipend is provided for this 10-month appointment as a Visiting Fellow; no formal teaching is involved.

Who’s it for: Composers, choreographers, performance artists, visual artists, writers, translators, or other kinds of artists. Most successful Fellows have published a book or have similar achievements in their own fields.

The Writer’s Center says : Unlike fellowships that involve teaching or literary administration, this is a generous award for artists solely pursuing independent projects.

PEN America Emerging Voices Fellowship

What it is: The Emerging Voices Fellowship provides a virtual five-month immersive mentorship program for early-career writers from communities that are traditionally underrepresented in the publishing world. The program is committed to cultivating the careers of Black writers, and serves writers who identify as Indigenous, persons of color, LGBTQ+, immigrants, writers with disabilities, and those living outside of urban centers.

Who’s it for: Underrepresented early-career writers.

The Writer’s Center says : This program lifts up writers who deserve recognition, demystifying the publishing process and introducing them to editors, agents, and publishers.

Persephone Miel Fellowship

What it is: The Pulitzer Center on Crisis Reporting will provide a grant of $5,000 for a reporting project on topics and regions of global importance, with an emphasis on issues that have gone unreported or underreported in the mainstream media.

Who’s it for: The Persephone Miel Fellowships are open to all journalists, writers, photographers, radio producers or filmmakers, staff journalists, as well as freelancers and media professionals outside the U.S. and Western Europe who are seeking to report from their home country but would like to broaden the reach of their reporting by publishing it in international outlets. Applicants must be proficient in English.

The Writer’s Center says : This grant gives a journalist an invaluable opportunity to explore an issue that goes unreported or underreported in mainstream media.

Wallace Stegner Fellowship

What it is: Stanford offers ten two-year fellowships each year, five in fiction and five in poetry. All the fellows in each genre convene weekly in a 3-hour workshop with faculty. Fellowships include a living stipend. Fellows’ tuition and health insurance are paid for by the Creative Writing Program.

Who’s it for: Candidates must live close enough to Stanford to be able to attend workshops, readings, and events.

The Writer’s Center says : This is a non-degree granting opportunity for a writer to get regular feedback from established poets and fiction writers.

Patrick Henry Writing Fellowship

What it is: The Center’s Patrick Henry History Fellowship includes a $45,000 stipend, health benefits, faculty privileges, a book allowance, and a nine-month residency (during the academic year) in a historic 18th-century house in Chestertown, Md.

Who’s it for: Applicants should have a significant project currently in progress — a book, film, oral history archive, podcast series, museum exhibition, or similar work. The project should address the history and/or legacy – broadly defined – of the U.S. founding era and/or the nation’s founding ideas. It might focus directly on early America, or on the myriad ways the questions that preoccupied the nation’s founding generation have shaped America’s later history. Work that contributes to ongoing national conversations about America’s past and present, with the potential to reach a wide public, is particularly sought.

The Writer’s Center says : This fellowship enables applicants to deeply explore a particular historical topic of Washington College’s choosing.

Scripps Fellowship

What it is: This is a non-degree, two-semester program that allows fellows to take environmental journalism classes at the University of Colorado Boulder.

Who’s it for: The fellowship is open to full-time journalists working in any medium who are interested in deepening and broadening their knowledge of environmental issues. It is aimed at outstanding journalists committed to a career in professional journalism. Applicants must have a minimum of five years of full-time professional journalism experience and have completed an undergraduate degree.

The Writer’s Center says : This is a fantastic opportunity for journalists who are interested in environmental issues.

Wisconsin Institute for Creative Writing Fellowship

What it is: The Wisconsin Institute for Creative Writing offers up to five internationally competitive nine-month fellowships each year. Typically, we award two fiction fellowships (the James C. McCreight Fiction Fellowship and the Carol Houck Smith Fiction Fellowship), and two poetry fellowships (the Jay C. and Ruth Halls Poetry Fellowship and the Ronald Wallace Poetry Fellowship). Additionally, the Institute offers one third-year MFA fellowship — the Hoffman-Halls Emerging Artist Fellowship — to a current student of UW-Madison, through a closed competition. Each of these fellowships carries with it a stipend of at least $39,000 paid in 9 equal installments beginning October 1, generous health benefits, and a one-course-per-semester teaching assignment in undergraduate creative writing.

Who’s it for: Applicants who have published only one full-length collection of creative writing; unpublished applicants are also eligible.

The Writer’s Center says : This fellowship gives a poet and fiction writer time and space to write, as well as teaching experience.

Grub Street’s Emerging Writer Fellowship

What it is: The Emerging Writer Fellowship aims to develop new, exciting voices by providing three writers per year tuition-free access to GrubStreet’s classes and Muse & the Marketplace conferences.

Who’s it for: Anyone over the age of 18 who demonstrates ability and passion for writing is eligible.

The Writer’s Center says : Much like The Writer’s Center Compass Fellowship, GrubStreet’s program enables writers to advance their craft while eliminating the financial barriers to entry.

Emory University Creative Writing Fellowship

What it is: Emory University offers two-year fellowships in fiction, poetry, and playwriting. The teaching load is 2-1, and the fellowship comes with a $45,000 salary and health benefits.

Who’s it for: Anyone who has received an MFA or Ph.D. in the last five years, and who has creative writing teaching experience, a record of publication, and a first book published or underway.

The Writer’s Center says : This is an opportunity for recent graduates of a creative writing program to gain teaching experience as well as space and time to work on their creative projects.

Emory College of Arts and Sciences Creative Writing Program

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Fellowship Positions

Seeking applicants for two-year fellowships at Emory University in Atlanta, GA.  For more information, please contact the Academic Department Administrator, Nora Lewis, at 404-727-4683 or [email protected] .

2024-2026 Creative Writing Fellowship in Fiction

FINALIST SELECTED

Interfolio link to apply: http://apply.interfolio.com/138251

Application deadline: february 15, 2024  .

Two-year fellowship in fiction in lively undergraduate English/Creative Writing Program, beginning Fall 2024. A two-year commitment is assumed but the contract renewal for the second year is contingent on a positive review of the first year. Load 2-1, all workshops; $45,000 and health benefits. Fellow will give a public reading. Required: MFA or PhD in last five years, with Creative Writing teaching experience; record of publication, but no full-length book published or under contract. Desirable: interest in secondary genre, creative nonfiction, and/or screenwriting.

Submit electronic dossier, including cover letter discussing teaching experience and philosophy, CV, name and contact information of two references, and a 25-page writing sample. In a separate statement, please describe your vision and experience teaching and mentoring students from diverse backgrounds. Submit all materials to http://apply.interfolio.com/138251 by 11:59pm on February 15, 2024 .

This deadline is firm and late applications will not be considered. The search committee will begin reviewing applications as they arrive. Applicants who make the longlist will be asked to submit recommendation letters from their two references as soon as possible, to be received no later than March 1.

Emory University is committed to student and faculty diversity, equality, and inclusion. Emory University is an equal employment opportunity and affirmative action employer. Women, minorities, people with disabilities, and veterans are strongly encouraged to apply.

2023-2025 Creative Writing Fellowship in Poetry

Description :.

Emory University Creative Writing Fellowship. Two-year fellowship in poetry in lively undergraduate English/Creative Writing Program, beginning Fall 2023. Load 1-2, all workshops; $45,000 salary, and health benefits. Fellow will give a public reading and have access to the Raymond Danowski Poetry Library, a 75,000-volume rare and modern poetry library housed at Emory. Required: MFA or PhD in the last five years, with undergraduate Creative Writing teaching experience. Desirable: record of periodical publications but no first book yet in print, and secondary interests such as creative nonfiction and working in archives. 

Submit electronic dossier, including cover letter discussing teaching experience and philosophy, CV, two references who will be contacted later in the process, and a writing sample of no more than 15 pages of poetry to http://apply.interfolio.com/113402 by 11:59pm, November 11, 2022 . This deadline is firm and late applications will not be considered. The search committee will begin reviewing applications on Wednesday, October 12, 2022 . In your cover letter or in a separate statement, please reflect upon your experience and vision regarding the teaching and mentorship of students from diverse backgrounds. Emory University is committed to student and faculty diversity, equality, and inclusion. Emory University is an equal employment opportunity and affirmative action employer. Women, minorities, people with disabilities, and veterans are strongly encouraged to apply.

2023-2025 Fellowship in Playwriting

Contact: lizzy clements,  [email protected]  .

Interfolio link to apply:  https://apply.interfolio.com/115899

Emory University offers a two-year Playwriting Fellowship in connection with its BA in Playwriting, a joint major offered by Theater Studies and the Creative Writing Program. Beginning in Fall 2023, the Fellowship offers a $45,000 salary, health benefits, and $1,000 annual travel fund. The Fellow will have a 2-1 teaching load, including playwriting workshops, literature courses such as 'Contemporary Drama,' and other courses to support the BA in Playwriting, within Theater Studies, Creative Writing, and/or English.  The Playwriting Fellow will give a public reading for the Creative Writing Reading Series, and work with Theater Emory and its Playwriting Center, including the contribution of a new play to the “Brave New Works” New Play Festival.  Fellows may be asked to direct student honors theses and/or other mentoring activities.  

A two-year commitment is assumed but the contract renewal for the second year is contingent on a positive review of the first year.

“It’s rare to find a position that provides this kind of support not just to my creative work, but my whole being. The long-term stability afforded to an Emory Fellow is unmatched by most programs out there. What’s more is that the whole city of Atlanta is there at your feet too, and there are so many exciting artists and cultures present here. It’s a special and energizing city in which to create.” - Megan Tabaque, 21-23 Playwriting Fellow

"The Emory Playwriting Fellowship is a rare gem among fellowships. Not only is there ample time and resources to pursue one's creative work, there is also the perfect balance between structure and freedom in exploring one's curricular work as an early-career educator. I was able to create and teach courses that directly align with my own research interests, and work with the most inspiring students and colleagues. My playwriting career also grew leaps and bounds during my fellowship, which was no coincidence — I would not have been able to nurture and travel for opportunities in the same way in any other position."               - Kimberly Belflower 19-21 Playwriting Fellow, Current Assistant Professor of Dramatic Writing at Emory University

Qualifications:

Required:  MFA in Playwriting, or equivalent degree, within the past 8 years, and related teaching experience.  Desirable:  Promising record of production and/or play development in regional or national theater.

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Meet Our 2021 Emerging Writer Fellows

The nine exceptional recipients of the 2021 The Center for Fiction/Susan Kamil Emerging Writer Fellowships are Joshua Borja , Gina Chung , Caleb Gayle , Senny George , Jared Jackson , Jen Lue , Mary Wang , Katie Yee , and Na Zhong . Each Fellow receives a $5,000 grant, mentorship with a distinguished editor, and publication in the annual fellows anthology.

The Fellows were selected from an impressive pool of 530 applicants in a blind judging process by writers Nicola DeRobertis-Theye ( The Vietri Project ), Sidik Fofana ( Stories from the Tenants Downstairs ), and Erin Somers ( Stay Up with Hugo Best ).

Each year, the judges panel of The Center for Fiction / Susan Kamil Emerging Writer Fellowships grant Honorable Mention / Alternate and Honorable Mention to praiseworthy applicants who do not receive fellowships. The panel recommends an alternate in the event that anyone selected as a Fellow is unable to accept the Fellowship. Honorable Mention is considered a significant achievement and we congratulate these applicants.

The following exceptional writers have been awarded Honorable Mention status: Linden Crawford , Sonia Feigelson (Alternate), Amanda Horn , Hannah Kingsley-Ma , JL Akagi , and Shayne Terry .

The Emerging Writer Fellowships are open to all early-career writers residing within the five boroughs of New York City. The Fellowship period began in October 2021 and lasted for 12 months. Along with a $5,000 grant and studio space at The Center for Fiction’s physical location in downtown Brooklyn, the Fellowship recipients work closely with an experienced editor to shape first books for submission, attend group dinners with notable agents, editors, and published writers, and take part in two public readings. In addition, their fiction is included in an anthology that is distributed to agents and editors.

Photos by Roque Nonini

Meet Our 2021 Fellows

Josh-5

Josh Borja is an educator and writer based in New York City. He has taught with CUNY Brooklyn College, the New York City College of Technology, NYU Shanghai, NYU Washington Square, Legal Outreach, and the Johns Hopkins summer program. His courses have ranged from writing-intensive Physics Laboratory courses, to English Grammar, English Composition, and Writing & Imagination.

Gina-3

Gina Chung is a Korean American writer from New Jersey currently living in Brooklyn, New York. She is the communications manager at PEN America and holds an MFA in fiction from The New School. Her work appears or is forthcoming in the Kenyon Review , Catapult , Gulf Coast , Indiana Review , Idaho Review , the Rumpus , Pleiades , F(r)iction , and Wigleaf , among others. Her stories have been recognized by the American Short(er) Fiction Contest, the Black Warrior Review Contest, the Los Angeles Review Literary Awards, the CRAFT Elements Contest, and the Ploughshares Emerging Writer’s Contest, as well as named Longform Fiction Pick of the Week. She is currently working on a novel about climate change, sea creatures, and loss and a collection of short stories about family, memory, and myths.

Caleb

Caleb J. Gayle

Caleb J. Gayle writes about the impact of history on race and identity, both in his nonfiction and fiction. Gayle’s writing has been featured in the New York Times magazine, the Atlantic , the Guardian , the Three Penny Review , Guernica (forthcoming), the Harvard Review , Pacific Standard , Time magazine, the New Republic , the Boston Globe , Los Angeles Review of Books , the Daily Beast , and more. Gayle is an author of the forthcoming nonfiction book from Riverhead Books, a narrative account of how many Black Native Americans were marginalized by white supremacy in America. Gayle completed both his MBA and master’s degree in public policy from Harvard Business School and Harvard’s John F. Kennedy School of Government as a Paul & Daisy Soros Fellow.

Photo Credit: Jeremy Castro

Senny-8

Senny George

Senny George is a Bronx-born writer who earned her MFA in fiction writing from Goddard College and her BA in journalism from Syracuse University. Her work has been published in the literary magazines Stone Canoe , Blackbird , and Jabberwock Review .

Jared-17

Jared Jackson

Jared Jackson is a writer, editor, educator, and arts administrator born in Hartford, CT. He received an MFA in fiction from Columbia University, where he was awarded a Chair’s Fellowship and Creative Writing Teaching Fellowship. His writing has received support from the Tin House Winter Workshop and has appeared in the New York Times Book Review , the Yale Review , Guernica , Kenyon Review , Catapult , and elsewhere. He has been awarded residencies and fellowships from MacDowell, Yaddo, Baldwin for the Arts, and The Center for Fiction. He is currently the Reviews and Interviews Editor at Apogee Journal , an Adjunct Assistant Professor at Columbia University, and the Program Director of Literary Programs and Emerging Voices at PEN America.

Jen-7

Jen Lue is a Kundiman fellow and a 2018 – 19 Margins fellow at the Asian American Writers’ Workshop. She is the recipient of grants and residencies from VONA/Voices, Millay Arts, Tin House, and Jerome Foundation among others. Her work has been featured in Joyland , the Margins , BOMB magazine, and Sepia Journal . She is a 2021 NYSCA/NYFA fiction finalist and is currently at work on a collection of short stories.

Mary-38

Mary Wang is a writer and editor based in New York. She leads Miscellaneous Files on Guernica, a series of virtual studio visits in which writers use digital artifacts to talk about their practice. You can find more of her writing on BOMB , the Guardian , Longreads , Michigan Quarterly Review , New Republic , WNYC, and Vogue , among others. Her story “The Child Is A Mother Too” was a finalist for the Missouri Review 2020 Jeffrey E. Smith Editor’s Prize.

Katie-8

Katie Yee is a writer from Brooklyn and the Book Marks Associate Editor at Literary Hub . She holds a BA from Bennington College and has been awarded a Kundiman Mentorship Lab Fellowship. Her work has appeared in the Los Angeles Review of Books , Epiphany , No Tokens , and elsewhere. You can find her on Twitter at @prepartynap .

Na-9

Na Zhong is a New York-based writer, literary translator, and cultural podcaster. She has written for the Margins , Literary Hub , the Los Angeles Review of Books , the Millions , A Public Space online, Catamaran Literary Reader , the Shanghai Literary Review , Brooklyn magazine, Words Without Borders , Asymptote , among other publications. Her work has received recognition from the Tin House Workshop, the Bette Howland Award, the New School Chapbook Contest, the Joan Jakobson Fellowship, and the Pushcart Prize. She is also the co-founder of Accent, a platform dedicated to connecting and supporting Asian diasporic writers. She has recently completed her first novel, which examines a fierce mother-daughter relationship through storytelling.

Applying for a Poetry or Fiction Fellowship

Applications open in January for the WICW Poetry and Fiction Fellowships, awarding stipends of more than $40,000 and generous health benefits. The submission deadline is March 1. Please read our instructions and eligibility requirements, below, before clicking here to upload your application .

To be eligible, applicants must have completed or be scheduled to complete an MFA or PhD in Creative Writing by August 15 of the fellowship year. Eligible applicants may have published no more than one full-length collection or book of poetry, fiction, or creative nonfiction as of the March 1 deadline. Individuals who have never published a full-length collection or book remain eligible, of course. Successful applicants must commit to reside in the Madison area for the full duration of the Fellowship from mid-August to mid-May (holiday and other travel are of course permitted); to teach one section of undergraduate mixed-genre or single-genre creative writing each semester; to hold no other teaching, graduate study or fellowship obligations; to assist in the selection of the following year’s Wisconsin Institute for Creative Writing Fellowships; and in general to participate fully in the life of the Madison writing community during the fellowship period. For more details regarding the responsibilities and privileges of our fellows, please see the main fellowships page .

Applicants should prepare the following materials before  applying :

  • A $50.00 Application Fee, paid online by credit card.
  • A resume or curriculum vitae, concluding with the names, phone numbers, and email addresses of two recommenders.
  • A writing sample consisting of either 10 pages of poetry (single-spaced and uploaded as a pdf) or up to 30 pages of fiction (double-spaced and uploaded as a pdf). Fiction applications must consist of either one short story or a novel excerpt.  Your name  must not  appear anywhere on your manuscript , and while previously published work may be submitted, your manuscript must in no way indicate that your work has been published.

Do not include more than one genre in a single submission. You may apply in more than one of our fellowship genres, but you must upload a separate application for each, with separate application fees. If you are submitting short fiction, please do not send more than one short story. The limit is one story no matter how short that story may be. If you send more than one story, we will only read the first. If you are sending a novel excerpt you may (but need not) include a brief synopsis (one or two paragraphs) of the novel, as page one of the manuscript.

The poetry and fiction fellows will be chosen by May 1 each year, and announced on  the fellows page . If you have questions concerning these fellowships that are not answered in the FAQ below, please contact Sean Bishop and Ron Kuka, Administrators of the Wisconsin Institute for Creative Writing, at  [email protected] .

creative writing fellowship

Wisconsin Institute Alumni Spotlight: Jaquira Díaz

Jaquira Díaz was born in Puerto Rico and raised in Miami. She is the author of Ordinary Girls: A Memoir, winner of a Whiting Award, a Florida Book Awards Gold Medal, and a Lambda Literary Awards finalist. Ordinary Girls was an Indies Introduce Selection, a Barnes & Noble Discover Great New Writers Notable Selection, an Indie Next Pick, and a Library Reads pick. Díaz's work has been published in The Guardian, Time Magazine, T: The New York Times Style Magazine, and The Best American Essays 2016, among other publications. She is the recipient of two Pushcart Prizes, an Elizabeth George Foundation grant, and fellowships from the MacDowell Colony, the Kenyon Review, and the Wisconsin Institute for Creative Writing.

Her second book, I Am Deliberate: A Novel, is forthcoming from Algonquin Books. She is Assistant Professor in the MFA Creative Writing Program at Colorado State University.

creative writing fellowship

Fellowship FAQ

Required Degree

  • Q: I don’t have an MFA in Creative Writing, but I am a serious writer with a record of publications. May I apply for a fellowship?  A: Unfortunately, no. To be eligible for a Wisconsin Institute for Creative Writing fellowship, you must have completed an MFA or PhD in Creative Writing by August 15th of the fellowship year. For those who pursued a graduate degree in creative writing outside the USA or Canada, in a country where an MA in Creative Writing (rather than an MFA) is the standard terminal degree, we will except the MA rather than the MFA. But all applicants must have completed a graduate degree in creative writing, regardless of their publication records or other special circumstances.
  • Q: I have a graduate degree in a field other than creative writing. Am I eligible for a fellowship?  A: Again, we have to say no. This question is usually asked by persons holding PhDs in other fields. Unfortunately, we are not able to award fellowships to persons with PhDs in any other area, including English literature, composition, theater, or other areas of English or theater studies. Even if you have a PhD in English, took graduate-level writing workshops, and wrote a creative dissertation, we still cannot offer you a fellowship if your PhD is not specifically in creative writing.
  • Q: May I apply for a fellowship if I have an MA in creative writing?  A: Only if you pursued your MA outside the USA or Canada, in a country where an MA in Creative Writing is the standard terminal degree. Since the MFA and Ph.D. in Creative Writing are co-terminal degrees in North America, we only accept those degrees from applicants who completed their graduate degrees in the US, Mexico, or Canada.

Previous Books

  • Q: Am I eligible if I have already published a novel or a full-length collection of poetry, short stories, or creative nonfiction?  A: Yes. We allow applicants to have published or have forthcoming one full-length book of creative writing prior to the March 1 application deadline. If you have published more than one book by that deadline, however, you are not eligible.
  • Q: I have not published a book-length collection. Am I still eligible? Should I bother applying?  A: Yes! Our reading process is anonymous; most of our fellows will not have published a collection prior to being selected. Since we opened the fellowships to applicants with one book in 2012, the majority of our fellows have not published or sold a book-length work prior to their acceptance.
  • Q: I’ve published more than one book that is neither fiction, nor poetry, nor creative nonfiction ( e.g.  a cookbook, a car repair manual, or an ESL textbook). Am I eligible for the fellowship?   A: Yes. Books that are not creative writing do not count for fellowship purposes. If you are unsure if your book is considered a creative work, feel free to  contact us .
  • Q: In addition to one collection of creative work, I’ve edited an anthology. Am I eligible for the fellowship?   A: Yes.
  • Q: Am I still eligible if I published one full-length book of creative writing, plus one or more chapbooks?   A: Yes. A chapbook is not considered a book for fellowship purposes. However, please note that we regard any poetry collection exceeding 45 pages to be a full-length manuscript, even if the press labels it a “chapbook.”
  • Q: If I’ve published more than one full-length book of creative writing, but in two or more different genres, may I still apply for a fellowship?   A: No. Since the fellowship is provided to give writers time to work on a first or second book of creative work, you are no longer eligible to apply, even though your books were in different genres.

Writing Sample (fiction and poetry fellowships only)

  • Q: May I submit a slightly longer writing sample than the rules permit?   A: No. Additional material beyond the stated page limits will not be read.
  • Q: If I write very short stories, may I send more than one? May I upload two 15-page stories instead of one 30-page story?   A: No to both questions. You may submit only one short story, no matter how short, even if that means you are sending fewer than 30 pages of work. If you send more than one story, only the first will be read.
  • Q: You say each poem must begin on a new page. What do I do about a poem that won’t fit on just one page?  A: Sorry for the confusion here. You may, of course, continue the poem on as many pages as necessary. You may, for example, submit a single 10-page poem, or two 5-page poems, or five 2-page poems. What we are asking is that each new poem should begin on a new page.
  • Q: May I upload/e-mail additional material, or substitute another story, or otherwise update my application at a later date?   A: No. Only the original material submitted with the application will be considered.

Selection Process (fiction and poetry fellowships only)

  • Q: Could you give me an idea of how you go about selecting your poetry and fiction fellows?  A: Sure. Submittable applications are made anonymous to everyone but the Program Administrators; only the writing samples themselves are visible to the committee. The anonymous fiction manuscripts are assigned to a panel of fiction judges, and the anonymous poetry manuscripts are assigned to a panel of poetry judges. The judges then read and evaluate the manuscripts, narrowing down the field until each panel has selected the fellowship recipients and several alternates. Judges who recognize work by former students or close personal acquaintances recuse themselves with respect to that work. Only after the judges have chosen and ranked the best manuscripts are those selected manuscripts matched up with the applicants’ other materials. This is the first time the judges learn the names of, and other information about, the winners and alternates.
  • Q: Who are the judges?  A: The exact composition of the fiction and poetry panels changes from year to year, but panels always consist of members of the creative writing faculty, as well as current and former Institute fellows. There are at least five judges on each final committee.
  • Q: When and how will you let me know your decision?  A: We make our decisions and email or phone the selected poetry, fiction, and HEAF fellows by May 1. As soon as we have all of our acceptances we post the names of our new fellows on this website and notify other applicants via e-mail of our selections.
  • Q: Is there a certain style of writing you favor?  A: While selecting the fellows is a subjective process in which personal taste plays a large role, we do not intentionally restrict ourselves to certain styles of writing (as you will see from the aesthetic range of fellows throughout our history ). Because the composition of our selection panel changes annually, it is hard to predict what kind of work will speak to a panel in a given year. All we can suggest is that you send in what you believe to be your very best work.
  • Q: Do I have to indicate which of the fellowships I’m applying for ( e.g.  if I’m applying for a poetry fellowship, do I have to specify whether I’m applying for a Halls or a Wallace fellowship)?   A: No. The Institute will assign the fellowships; all you have to do is let us know the genre in which you’re applying.

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CAAPP Creative Writing Fellowship

The fellowship in creative writing at the center for african american poetry and poetics is a two-year fellowship for poets who have completed an mfa or phd and have published no more than one full-length book., while the primary goal is to provide an early-career poet with time and space to pursue their own creative work, the fellow also teaches one community workshop each year; is a guest presenter in the course studio in african american poetry and poetics; participates in co-lab, the interactive public forum in which visiting writers and artists present their work in progress; gives one public reading with a q&a; facilitates one session of the writers’ café; and has the option to teach a course at the university. .

The full application can be found here!

We at CAAPP are thrilled to announce that Xan Phillips is our 2021-23 Fellow in Creative Writing.

Xan Phillips is a Whiting Award-winning poet and visual artist from rural Ohio. The recipient of a LAMBDA Literary Award, and the Judith A. Markowitz Award for Emerging Writers, Xan is the author of  HULL  (Nightboat Books 2019) and  Reasons for Smoking , which won the 2016 Seattle Review Chapbook Contest judged by Claudia Rankine. He has received fellowships from Brown University, Callaloo, Cave Canem, The Conversation Literary Festival, Oberlin College, the Wisconsin Institute for Creative Writing, and are the 2021-2023 Center for African American Poetry and Poetics Fellow. His current projects include an experimental nonfiction manuscript, a book of ekphrastic poetry, and an ever-growing visual art studio practice. Xan’s poetry has appeared in  Berlin Quarterly Review, BOMB Magazine, Crazyhorse, Poets.org , and  Virginia Quarterly Review  and anthologies such as  Best Experimental Writing (Weslyan Press 2020) and  We Want It All: An Anthology of Radical Trans Poetics (Nightboat Books 2020). His paintings have been featured in Kenyon Review , The Poetry Projec t, and the cover of American Poets Magazine . For more, visit X an at his website .

Runner Up: Nabila Lovelace

Finalists (in alphabetical order):

Diamond Forde Niki Herd Imani Elizabeth Jackson Naima Yael Tokunow

Past Fellows

2019-2021: justin phillip reed, inaugural , 2017-2019: rickey laurentiis.

  • Creative Writing Fellowship
  • Departments & Programs
  • Department of English and Creative Writing

To enhance our strong program in creative writing, the Department of English and Creative Writing established the Olive B. O’Connor Fellowship in Creative Writing.

This annual fellowship is designed to support writers completing their first books. It provides a generous stipend, office space, and an intellectual community for the recipients, who spend one academic year at Colgate. In return, each fellow teaches one creative writing workshop per semester and gives a public reading of their work.

2024–2025 Fellowships

Colgate University invites applications for the Olive B. O’Connor Fellowship in Creative Writing. This year we invite applications for:

  • One fellowship in fiction
  • One fellowship in nonfiction

Writers who have recently completed an MFA, MA, or PhD in creative writing, and who need a year to complete their first book, are encouraged to apply. The selected writers will spend the academic year (late August 2023 to early May 2024) at Colgate University in Hamilton, New York. The fellows will teach one multigenre course each semester and will give a public reading from the work in progress.

The fellowship includes:

  • A stipend of $55,500
  • Travel expenses
  • Health and life insurance are provided

Applications

Deadline: January 5, 2024 Applications materials include: 

  • cover letter
  • three letters of recommendation, at least one of which should address the candidate’s abilities as a teacher
  • A maximum of 30 double-spaced manuscript pages of prose. The writing sample may be a completed work or an excerpt from something larger.  

Colgate strives to be a community supportive of diverse perspectives and identities. All applications should speak directly to the candidate’s ability to work effectively with students across a wide range of identities and backgrounds.

Fiction Application

Nonfiction Application

Colgate is a highly selective liberal arts university of 3,200 students situated in central New York State. The Colgate faculty is committed to excellence in both teaching and scholarship. Further information about the  English department  is online. It is the policy of Colgate University not to discriminate against any employee or applicant for employment on the basis of their race, color, creed, religion, age, sex, pregnancy, national origin, marital status, disability, Protected Veteran status, sexual orientation, gender identity or expression, being or having been victims of domestic violence or stalking, familial status, or any other categories covered by law. Candidates from historically underrepresented groups, women, persons with disabilities, and Protected Veterans are encouraged to apply.

2023–2024 Olive B. O’Connor Fellows

Headshot of Lena Crown

Lena Crown is a writer, editor and educator from Northern California. Her work is published or forthcoming in Guernica, Gulf Coast, The Rumpus, Narratively, North American Review, Bellevue Literary Review, The Offing, and elsewhere. She has received fellowships from Virginia Center for the Creative Arts, the Ragdale Foundation, and the Peter Bullough Foundation, and she previously served as the PEN/Faulkner Writer in Residence in Washington, D.C.

Headshot of Tolase

Ajibola Tolase

Ajibola Tolase is a Nigerian poet and essayist. He graduated from the creative writing MFA program at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. His chapbook, Koola Lobitos was published as a part of the New Generation African Poets Series edited by Kwame Dawes and Chris Abani in 2021. His writing has appeared in LitHub, New England Review, Prairie Schooner, Poetry, and elsewhere. He is a former Wallace Stegner fellow at Stanford University and has received a creative writing grant from the Elizabeth George Foundation. 

Past Fellows

Armen davoudian.

Armen Davoudian’s poems and translations from Persian appear in Poetry magazine , the Sewanee Review , the Yale Review , and elsewhere. His chapbook, Swan Song , won the 2020 Frost Place Competition.

Pallavi Wakharkar

Pallavi Wakharkar is a writer from Phoenix, AZ. She holds an M.F.A. in creative writing from Vanderbilt University and is the 2022-23 Olive B. O’Connor Fellow in fiction at Colgate. She was the 2021 winner of The Iowa Review Award in fiction, and her work appears in The Iowa Review , Joyland Magazine , and others. She is currently working on her first novel as well as a story collection.

Esther Hayes

Esther Hayes is a fiction writer from Nevada whose work has appeared or is forthcoming in  Guernica Magazine  and  Puerto del Sol.  She was a finalist in the 2020 AWP Intro Journals Project and the 2019  Sewanee Review  Fiction Contest .  She received her MFA from Colorado State University where she served as an associate editor for  Colorado Review.  She is currently working on a collection of short stories and her first novel.

Alexander Ramirez

Alexander Ramirez is from Sacramento, CA. He is the 2021-2022 Olive B. O'Connor Fellow in Creative Writing (Nonfiction). He holds a PhD in English from the University of Nebraska-Lincoln, and his writing has appeared in  The Missouri Review ,  Image Journal , and  The Journal of American Culture , among other publications.

Maggie Millner

Maggie Millner is a poet and educator from Central New York. Her poems appear or are forthcoming in The New Yorker, POETRY, Ploughshares, Gulf Coast, ZYZZYVA , and elsewhere. She serves as a senior editor at The Yale Review and an Olive B. O'Connor Fellow in Poetry at Colgate University.

Lucy Schiller

Lucy Schiller's nonfiction work has appeared in The Baffler , Contexto , The Columbia Journalism Review , The New Yorker , The Iowa Review , Goodnight , Sweet Prince , CounterPunch , and elsewhere. She was the 2018-2019 Provost's Fellow in Nonfiction at the University of Iowa, where she received her MFA. She is currently working on a nonfiction manuscript and on a novel.

Gbenga Adesina

Gbenga Adesina's poems have appeared in Narrative, Prairie Schooner, Washington Square Review, Vinyl, Brittle Paper and Ploughshares. He has received fellowships and scholarships from the Poets House, the Norman Mailer Center, the Fine Arts Work Centre, Provincetown, the Open Society Foundation in Goree Island, off the coast of Senegal, Callaloo at Oxford and New York University where he received his MFA and held the Starworks and Goldwater Fellowships. He was a joint winner of the 2016 Brunel International Poetry Prize, the 2017 Hugh J. Luke Award from Prairie Schooner, and the 2019 Palette Poetry Spotlight Award.

Annie Vitalsey

Annie Vitalsey is a fiction writer whose stories have appeared in Reed Magazine, Bennington Review, Pacifica Literary Review, Menacing Hedge, Spilled Milk Magazine, Watershed Review, and elsewhere. In 2018, she was a Virginia G. Piper Global Residency Fellow and received her first Pushcart nomination. In 2019, she was also awarded a Desert Nights Teaching Fellowship. Vitalsey has an MFA from Arizona State University, and is currently working on her first novel. 

Ndinda Kioko

Ndinda Kioko is a Kenyan writer whose works have appeared on several platforms and publications including The Trans-African , BBC Radio 4 , Wasafiri Magazine , Africa39 , and Jalada Africa . She has also produced a TV show for M-net Africa. Ndinda was a Miles Morland Scholar for 2014. She was awarded the 2017 Wasafiri New Writing Prize and the Richard & Juliette Logsdon Award for Creative Writing. She has an MFA in Creative Writing (Fiction) from the University of Oregon.

Emily Strasser

Emily Strasser received her MFA in nonfiction from the University of Minnesota. Her essays have appeared in Catapult , Ploughshares , Guernica , Colorado Review , The Bulletin of Atomic Scientists , and Tricycle , and twice listed as notable by Best American Essays . She was a winner of the 2015 Ploughshares Emerging Writer’s Contest, and a 2016 AWP Intro Award. Her writing and research have been supported by the Minnesota State Arts Board, the Jerome Foundation, and the W.K. Rose Fellowship from Vassar College.

Rachel M. Hanson

Rachel M. Hanson holds an MFA from the University of Utah and a PhD in literature and nonfiction from the University of Missouri. Her essays and poems can be found in  The Iowa Review ,  Best New Poets 2016 ,  Best of the Net Anthology 2015 ,  Creative Nonfiction ,  The South Dakota Review ,  American Literary Review ,  The Minnesota Review ,  Entropy Magazine ,  Ninth Letter , and elsewhere. She is a former nonfiction editor for  Quarterly West  and currently reads for  The Masters Review . In the summers she runs the Colorado River through the Grand Canyon, which is the inspiration for her newest collection of essays.

Emily Jaeger

Emily Jaeger is the author of the chapbook  The Evolution of Parasites ( Sibling Rivalry Press ) illustrated by Robin Levine. Her poems have appeared in  Four Way Review ,  TriQuarterly , and  The Offing  among others. Emily received her MFA from the University of Massachusetts Boston and she has also received fellowships from Literary Lambda, TENT, the New York State Summer Writers Institute, and an Academy of American Poet's Prize.

Nana Kwame Adjei-Brenyah

Nana Kwame Adjei-Brenyah is from Spring Valley, Rockland County, New York. He is a graduate of the Syracuse MFA program in fiction. His stories have appeared or are forthcoming in Broken Pencil Magazine , Pembroke , Compose , Printer's Row , and others. He was a 2016 finalist for the Nelson Algren Literary Award and he is working on his first collection of short fiction.

Erin J. Mullikin

Erin J. Mullikin hails from the deepest earth in South Carolina and has an MFA from Syracuse University, where she edited Salt Hill Journal. She is the author of the chapbooks, When You Approach Me at the Lake of Tomorrow (Slash Pine Press) and Strategies for the Bromidic (dancing girl press), and her poems and short fiction have appeared in elsewhere , Ghost Ocean , Sprung Formal , alice blue review , Phantom , Arts & Letters , and Best New Poets 2014 , among others. She is a founding editor for NightBlock and Midnight City Books .

Thomas Mira y Lopez

Thomas Mira y Lopez is from New York. He has an MFA in creative nonfiction from the University of Arizona, where he worked as nonfiction editor for  Sonora Review  and managing editor for  Fairy Tale Review . His essays appear or are forthcoming in  Seneca Review, The Pinch, Hotel Amerika, CutBank  and other journals. He has received scholarships from Bread Loaf and the New York State Summer Writers Institute. He is at work on a book of personal essays about cemeteries and burial grounds that explores where we place and how we remember the dead.

D.J. Thielke

D.J. Thielke received her MFA in fiction from Vanderbilt University. Her stories have appeared in  Arts&Letters, The Cincinnati Review, Indiana Review, Mid-American Review,   Bat City Review , and  Crazyhorse , among others. She was the 2013-2014 James C. McCreight Fiction Fellow at the Wisconsin Institute for Creative Writing, the inaugural fall 2014 Stone Court Writer-in-Residence, and was most recently a summer fellow at the Island Institute in Sitka, Alaska.

Chelsea Biondolillo

Chelsea Biondolillo has a dual MFA in creative writing and environmental studies from the University of Wyoming. In 2012, she was an NSF-funded Think Write Publish communication fellow, and in 2014 she was awarded the Carter Prize for the Essay from  Shenandoah . Her prose has appeared or is forthcoming in  Orion, Sonora Review,   Guernica,  River Teeth ,  Hayden's Ferry Review  and others. She has written on the art of essay for  Essay Daily ,  Brevity ,  Passages North , and  Creative Nonfiction . Her journalism has appeared in  Nautilus ,  Science,  and on state and national public radio. She is currently working on a book about vultures that combines travel, memoir, ecology, and natural history.

Javier Zamora

Javier Zamora was born in El Salvador in 1990. When he was nine, he migrated to the United States. He is a CantoMundo fellow and has received scholarships from Breadloaf, Napa Valley, Squaw Valley, and VONA writer's conferences. Zamora’s poems appear in  Best New Poets 2013, Narrative Magazine, Ploughshares, Poetry,  and elsewhere. He is the recipient of a National Endowment for the Arts fellowship,  Meridian’s Editor’s Poetry Prize, and  CONSEQUENCE’s  poetry prize.

Caitlin Hayes

Caitlin Hayes has an M.A. in English Literature from the University of New Hampshire and an M.F.A in fiction from Syracuse University, where she served as fiction editor for  Salt Hill Journal . Her honors include a Joyce Carol Oates Award for short fiction and a scholarship to Bread Loaf. She has stories forthcoming in the  New England Review  and  The Southern Review .

Dong Li’s honors include DAAD (twice), Vermont Studio Center and Henry Luce Foundation fellowships. Born and raised in the People’s Republic of China, Li has degrees from Deep Springs College and Brown University. His work has appeared in  Conjunctions and comma , poetry.

Amy Butcher

Amy Butcher is a graduate of Gettysburg College and the Nonfiction Writing Program at the University of Iowa. Her essays and short stories have appeared or are forthcoming in  The Indiana Review, The Colorado Review, Brevity, The Rumpus,  and  Hobart , among others, and she is a recent recipient of a Stanley Grant for International Research. She is the managing editor of  Defunct  and a former intern for the Gettysburg Review , and is currently at work on a book-length essay that meditates on the historic battlefield town of Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, and a murder that recently occurred there. The book considers the nature of friendship and the parameters inherent in the relationships we seek.

Chinelo Okparanta

Chinelo received her BS from Penn State University, her MA from Rutgers University, and her MFA from the Iowa Writers' Workshop. Her works have appeared or are forthcoming in  Granta, The Kenyon Review, The Iowa Review, The Southern Review, The Coffin Factory, Conjunctions, Subtropics , and elsewhere. She has taught at the University of Iowa, where she served as a Dean's Fellow and subsequently as the Provost Postgraduate Visiting Writer for Fiction. Her short story collection will be published in 2013, followed shortly by her debut novel, tentatively entitled  Under The Udara Trees .

Molly Beer is a graduate of Duke University, the Bread Loaf School of English, and the University of New Mexico MFA program, where she served as nonfiction editor for Blue Mesa Review . In addition to the American Southwest, she has lived in El Salvador, Ecuador, and Mexico, and her subsequent essays grapple with the politics of place. Her most recent work appears in Salon , Guernica , Glimpse , Copper Nickel , and Room Magazine , and she is co-author of Singing Out , an oral history published by Oxford University Press (2010).

George David Clark

George David Clark's honors include a Henry Hoyns Fellowship from the University of Virginia and the Provost's Doctoral Fellowship at Texas Tech. His poems appear in such journals as The Cimarron Review , The North American Review , Quarterly West , Shenandoah , Smartish Pace , Southern Poetry Review , Willow Springs and elsewhere, and can be found reprinted online at Verse Daily and Poetry Daily . He also serves as editor of the journal, 32 Poems .

Jasmine Bailey

Jasmine Bailey graduated from Colgate in 2005 and the University of Virginia MFA program in 2010. There, she worked as poetry editor for the semi-annual literary journal, Meridian . Her chapbook of poems, Sleep and What Precedes It , won the Longleaf Press 2009 Chapbook Prize and her book-length collection of poetry, Alexandria , will be published by Carnegie Mellon. Her poems have appeared or are forthcoming in the minnesota review , Poet Lore , 32 Poems , The Carolina Quarterly , The Portland Review , and the Birmingham Poetry Review , among others.

Marjorie Celona

Marjorie Celona studied writing at the University of Victoria and the Iowa Writers’ Workshop, where she was an Iowa Arts Fellow and recipient of the Ailene Barger Barnes Prize for Excellence in the Short Story. Her stories have appeared in The Best American Nonrequired Reading (2008), Glimmer Train , Crazyhorse , Best Canadian Stories (2007, 2010, 2012), The Fiddlehead , Indiana Review , and elsewhere. In May, she will be writer-in-residence at Hawthornden Castle in Scotland, where she plans to finish her novel.

Sarah Beth Childers

Sarah finds much of her writing inspiration in the creeks, hills, and train tracks around where she grew up in Huntington, West Virginia. She has a bachelor of arts in history from Marshall University and a master of fine arts in creative nonfiction from West Virginia University. She has taught writing at West Virginia University and medieval literature and history at Duke University’s Talent Identification Program. Her work has appeared in SNReview and Paddlefish , and her short story “Red Ribbon” was nominated for a Pushcart Prize in 2009

Anthony Eleftherion

Anthony Eleftherion’s stories have appeared in the Madison Review and Epoch . He holds a bachelor’s degree in philosophy from Rutgers University and a master of fine arts degree from the Iowa Writers’ Workshop, where he was a Maytag fellow. A short film he co-wrote received a student academy award, the HBO short film award, the grand jury awards at South by Southwest and Palm Springs Film Festivals, and was an official selection of the Sundance film festival. He is completing a collection of stories about Brooklyn, NY.

Fellowship in Creative Writing

The competition for the 2024 cintas foundation fellowship in creative writing is now open. (deadline may 1, 2024).

creative writing fellowship

Candidates may submit proposals in the field of creative writing. Candidates are encouraged to send their materials electronically to the email address below or ship by express mail only if necessary. Acceptable methods include links, files, Dropbox, Hightail, or flash drive. In the event manuscripts are submitted which are not firmly attached to an application, each should be individually labeled to show the applicant's name. The date of execution of each work should be given. For the purpose of historical value, the winner is expected to submit a signed and dated manuscript to be added to the CINTAS Fellows Collection.

Since 1963, the CINTAS Foundation has awarded over 81 fellowships in creative writing. In addition to supporting Cuban artists, many early in their careers, the CINTAS Foundation also maintains a growing collection of works by past awardees and other esteemed Cuban artists. For the purpose of historical value and documentation, award recipients are encouraged to submit creative writing sample, signed book, or other such representative samples of their work to be added to the CINTAS Fellows Collection after the grant period.

Eligibility: Creative artists of Cuban citizenship or direct lineage (having a Cuban parent or grandparent). Performing artists are not eligible to apply for CINTAS Fellowships. CINTAS Fellowships can only be awarded a maximum of 2 times to an individual.

All forms must be filled out and included in submission or or saved flash drive. All forms should be signed as required and electronic signatures are acceptable.

Application

The full application must be submitted. The application must be completed in English or Spanish. Please complete all sections of the application.

Artist and Project Statements

Prepare two narrative statements: The Artist Statement describes your personal history, your development as an artist, and your plans for the future. The Project Statement describes the project or activity that you would undertake if awarded a CINTAS Fellowship. Please include a timeline for the project, and identify other sources, where appropriate, of funding for the project.

Letters of Recommendation

Candidates must submit two letters of recommendation with the application. Letters may be submitted separately, if necessary, but must be received by the application deadline. Each letter of recommendation must be submitted as a PDF attached to an email, with the recommender's signature and written in English or Spanish. Hard copies of the signed letter are also acceptable.

Submission of Work Samples

All material should be submitted to the CINTAS Fellowship Selection Program by the application deadline. Candidates are encouraged to send their materials electronically to the email address below or ship portfolios by express mail only if necessary. Acceptable methods include links, Dropbox, Hightail, or flash drive. Materials must be accompanied by the Work Sample Form. Pieces should be carefully itemized on this form. Limit the submission to 10 (ten) samples.

Send material to:

Laurie Escobar CINTAS Foundation 8724 Sunset Drive, PMB 528 Miami, FL 33173

Return of Work Samples

Work samples will be returned to candidates following the competition, provided that Cintas Fellowship Program is furnished with a self-addressed envelope or mailing container stamped with the appropriate postage.

Download PDFs

The CINTAS Application Form The CINTAS Letters of Recommendation Form The CINTAS Work Sample Form

NOTICE TO APPLICANTS: The award ($25,000 US) is considered taxable income under US tax law and the Foundation will withhold appropriate US taxes. Fellows who are not U.S. citizens and who are living abroad must provide a U.S. taxpayer identification number when they accept the fellowship to receive payment. The address for the IRS website: www.irs.gov, at which the form is readily available. The Foundation's grant of an award is subject to current and future U.S. laws and regulations that may limit its ability to issue funds to Cuban Nationals.

CINTAS FELLOWSHIPS

Fellowship in Architecture & Design

Fellowship in Architecture & Design

Fellowship in Creative Writing

Fellowship in Music Composition

Fellowship in Photography

Fellowship in Photography

Fellowship in Visual Arts

Fellowship in Visual Arts

University of Notre Dame

Department of English

College of Arts and Letters

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Creative Writing Program Director Roy Scranton wins Guggenheim Fellowship

Published: April 11, 2024

Author: Paul Cunningham

Roy Scranton Headshot

Associate Professor of English and Creative Writing Program Director Dr. Roy Scranton has been named a 2024 Fellow of the John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation , and awarded a grant supporting his forthcoming book Ethical Pessimism: Climate Change and the Limits of Narrative . Now in its 99th year, the John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation recognizes & awards monetary prizes to the 2024 class of trail-blazing fellows across 52 fields.

“Humanity faces some profound existential challenges,” said Edward Hirsch, award-winning poet and president of the John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation. “The Guggenheim Fellowship is a life-changing recognition. It’s a celebrated investment into the lives and careers of distinguished artists, scholars, scientists, writers and other cultural visionaries who are meeting these challenges head-on and generating new possibilities and pathways across the broader culture as they do so.”

In all, 52 scholarly disciplines and artistic fields, 84 academic institutions, 38 US states and the District of Columbia, and four Canadian provinces are represented in the 2024 class, who range in age from 28 to 89. More than 40 Fellows (roughly 1 out of 4) do not hold a full-time affiliation with a college or university. Many Fellows’ projects directly respond to timely issues such as democracy and politics, identity, disability activism, machine learning, incarceration, climate change and community. Since its founding in 1925, the Foundation has awarded over $400 million in fellowships to more than 19,000 fellows.

Dr. Roy Scranton is an essayist, novelist, literary critic, and climate philosopher, best known for his work on war, war literature, and the Anthropocene. He is the author of five books, and has written widely for publications such as the New York Times , Rolling Stone , MIT Technology Review , the Yale Review , and elsewhere. Dr. Scranton grew up in Oregon, dropped out of college, and spent his early twenties wandering the American West. He served four years in the US Army (2002–2006), including fourteen months in Iraq, then completed his bachelor’s degree and earned a master’s degree at the New School for Social Research, before earning a Ph.D. in English at Princeton. His essay “Learning How to Die in the Anthropocene” was selected for the 2015  Best American Science and Nature Writing . He was a postdoctoral fellow at the Center for Energy and Environmental Research in the Human Sciences at Rice University, has been awarded a Whiting Fellowship in the Humanities and a Lannan Literary Fellowship for Fiction, and held the inaugural Teaching Lab Fellowship at the Notre Dame Institute for Advanced Study.

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Armstrong's 60th standup performance at the Hot Water Comedy Club in Liverpool.

Watson Fellowship Winner Tommy Armstrong ’20: Travels and Reflections

“After three attempted muggings, I am quite aware of my surroundings everywhere I go. I’m curious how else I have changed.” - Tommy Armstrong

     “After three attempted muggings, I am quite aware of my surroundings everywhere I go. I’m curious how else I have changed,” says Tommy Armstrong, an Ursinus alumnus who graduated in 2020. During his senior year at Ursinus, Armstrong was selected as a Watson Fellow. The Ursinus website states that the Thomas J. Watson Fellowship is a “one-year grant for purposeful, independent exploration outside the United States, awarded to graduating seniors nominated by one of 41 partner institutions.”

     Armstrong graduated with a major in English and minors in Film and Creative Writing. He was one stagecraft class away from a minor in Theater and says, “If they had the Creative Writing major when I was there, you could bet I’d be one of those.”

     After a delay in his travels due to Covid-19, Armstrong began his journey around the world in April 2023. Armstrong’s trip included traveling to cities in nine countries, including Barcelona, Spain; Vienna, Austria; Istanbul, Turkey; Cape Town, South Africa; Liverpool, England; Berlin, Germany; Tokyo, Japan; Auckland, New Zealand; and Buenos Aires, Argentina.

     Published in The Grizzly in April 2020, an article written by Kevin Leon ’20 followed the announcement that Armstrong had been awarded a Watson Fellowship. In the article, Armstrong is quoted describing his project, stating that he would be studying “the intersection between comedy and hardship and see where the comedic impulse comes from around the world and how it’s affected by cultural norms and events.” Additionally, Armstrong is quoted saying that he wanted to “examine comedy as a coping mechanism for depression and [see] if that is a global trend…[by] shadowing improv troupes and comedy groups around the world.”

     While having a lot of appreciation for improv, during his travels Armstrong became obsessed with standup comedy. Everywhere that he went, Armstrong took pictures of every comedian at comedy shows to share with them afterward. Armstrong says, “My mom would always take pictures of all the athletes when we did sports growing up to share with everybody and I thought that was a really meaningful and lasting way to support people in what they love to do, and my mom let me use her SmugMug account, so.”

     Watching so much standup inspired Armstrong to start doing it himself, and he fell in love with it. He had his first two shows on April 24, 2023, and has performed over 150 times since. Recording each of his sets, Armstrong has been able to see the astonishing changes in his performances. Armstrong says, “I’ve read recently you need 10,000 hours of practice in a discipline to reach your potential in it, and for comedians who are vying for 5-minute spots at weekly open mics, you can imagine how much room there is for growth for almost every comedian.” He adds, “I know being a comedian is part of who I am now, and wherever I am in life, I will find my way onto a stage.”

     During his independent exploration, Armstrong interviewed approximately 50 comedians around the globe for 30 to 90 minutes. Armstrong tried not to approach the project with “rigid predetermined ideas about the connection between comedy and depression,” but with almost every comedian he told about the project, “it seemed to light up a well of ideas in their mind about the relationship between the two.” Armstrong notes, “It was funny. They seemed to know what my project was about before I did.” Working as a digital communications specialist at Ursinus, including journalism work and video production, allowed Armstrong to develop interviewing skills that paid off during his conversations with comedians. At this point in time, Armstrong is editing clips of each comedian to post, and he is creating transcripts from the interviews with the goal of writing a book about comedy and depression.

     During his time as a student at Ursinus, Armstrong started the habit of posting a new comedy video every week. This year abroad, he has been able to post five days a week due to the increased speed of editing standup clips, and his audiences have grown much larger on TikTok and especially Instagram. Armstrong says, “Instagram is especially cool because my content is reaching comedians who I admire and am a fan of and some of those comedians are following me back, sharing my stuff, and reaching out to me. That has been unreal.” When Armstrong was in Berlin, just six months into his standup journey, the comedian Todd Glass reached out to him. “I just woke up from a nap and thought I was dreaming,” says Armstrong. Since then, Glass has been a very kind supporter of Armstrong, with Armstrong asking Glass for advice and asking him to participate in his Watson project as an interviewee.

     The Watson Fellowship has allowed Armstrong to carry out his project, but it has also given him an opportunity to grow as a person and to learn more about himself. This led to Armstrong making a discovery relating to his own personal relationship between emotions and joke-writing. “My jokes aren’t necessarily reflections of my feelings, a lot of them are just the funniest thoughts that I had in a particular situation, reading, in the shower, or while eating a peanut butter and jelly sandwich,” says Armstrong. One thing that he has learned is that when he is experiencing sadness he is not interested in creating comedy, stating, “I assumed that because comedy was such a joyful release from sadness that my mind would gravitate to joke writing when I was feeling unwell, but when I’m depressed, I reach for guitar instead of a pen.” Everywhere that Armstrong went, he bought a cheap second-hand guitar and would play it every day, especially when he was “blue.” He would tinker with chords, find a progression that he liked, and then play and freestyle lyrics over it in a voice recording. “Anyway, now those musical recordings give me a window into what I was feeling and thinking in each place,” Armstrong states.

     Armstrong has experienced great growth in his year abroad, and he reflects on his time at Ursinus and how the skills that he developed in college have contributed to his success in carrying out his project. As an English major, reading and thinking about literature has helped him develop a “tool kit” for listening to and reviewing comedy. Armstrong says, “Having guided discussions around books helps you discover the vocabulary for understanding what you like and don’t like in jokes, and that makes the time spent watching comedians a more productive experience for thinking about what you want to achieve with your own jokes.”

     Workshopping in creative writing classes was fundamental in how Armstrong approaches communicating with other comedians and creators “about their craft.” He explains that he cannot go “charging in with criticism” but also cannot be dishonest or vague about what it is he likes, expressing that every comedian has a strength that they can develop to make their comedy uniquely good. “When people ask my advice on their comedy, I think helping reflect that strength to them is important, and so is describing to them things they may not realize they’re doing that are hindering them,” says Armstrong.

     Additionally, Armstrong had an “eye-opening” DIY Publishing course with his advisor, and friend, Dr. Jon Volkmer that showed him the value in and necessity of being purposeful in what one creates in a way to build an audience around it. During the course, Armstrong discovered that he enjoyed making fun of formats that he was already familiar with. He created an “inept vlogger” character named Gary to make fun of niche YouTube list makers and now his TikTok account is called @GarysFather and has over 110k followers, saying, “People probably don’t know why the hell it’s called GarysFather, but anyways, haha.” Today, much of his standup content makes fun of the expectations people have at comedy shows. Armstrong says, “One easy joke format a lot of comedians tell is, ‘People say I look like if ____ was ____,’ so I have a joke, ‘People say I look like… my family.’”

     Dr. Jon Volkmer, Professor of English at Ursinus College, speaks to his experience working with Armstrong, saying, “Tommy is possessed of endless stores of energy and invention. Whether recruiting faculty to act in his films, or a business to let him use their space, Tommy was never shy about asking, and managed to exude confidence and professionalism at every step.”

     Armstrong finds that the most important thing that he learned at Ursinus was that “people are the most important.” He explains that he would not have received this life-changing opportunity without help from people who cared about him, like Jon Volkmer, Carol Dole, Talia Argondezzi, Domenick Scudera, Meredith Goldsmith, Johanna Mellis, Kelly Sorensen, and others.

     Dr. Talia Argondezzi, Director of the Writing and Speaking Program and co-chair of the Watson Fellowship Committee, worked closely with Armstrong. Argondezzi says, “Before I started working with Tommy on his Watson application, I was already familiar with the hilarious and poignant videos he had made throughout his undergraduate years, so I was a fan.” When working with Armstrong for his Watson, Argondezzi noted that his enthusiasm for comedy was “infectious and irresistible.” She states, “It’s a cliché that as a teacher, sometimes you learn more from students than they learn from you, but in this case, it was very literal: working with Tommy was one of the experiences that helped to spark my interest in writing comedy, and I have been doing so ever since.” Argondezzi and Armstrong even worked on a video together, with Jeff Bender, a writer who teaches CIE at Ursinus.

     It is evident that Armstrong has left a lasting impression on many of the professors at Ursinus, including Dr. Carol Dole, Professor of English. Dole says, “I heard about both his creativity and his ambition before I even met him; other faculty were talking about a really talented first-year student named Tommy who made films.” Dole is very interested in film, so she went to see a film of his that he had arranged to show at the Colonial Theater in Phoenixville, “presenting a real movie on the big screen at age 19!” After that, Armstrong showed up in many of Dole’s classes, and she was delighted to have “a student who was both extremely creative and also an excellent analyst and academic writer.” Dole still remembers the final project that Armstrong crafted in 2018 in her seminar on adaptation. One of the book-to-film adaptations that students could envision was a version of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde . Dole says, “Tommy elected not only to write the 10-page thematic analysis, but also to do an optional video of his own: a complex choose-your-own adventure game in the style of early film.” She adds, “The fact that it was an optional ‘extra’ made it especially impressive that it was so well produced: Tommy came up with period costumes, got a fellow student/friend to devise a score appropriate to the style, and played all the parts himself!”

     In between graduating and beginning his year abroad, Armstrong worked as a staff member at Ursinus. As a staff member, one of his favorite opportunities was helping Watson finalists Austin Mickles, Jeff Cocci, Nikole Fandiño Pachon, and Paige Bristow prepare, with Bristow winning a Watson Fellowship. Commenting on his work with Bristow, Armstrong says, “It has been awesome corresponding with each other during our journeys, and helping her prepare is one of my biggest accomplishments at Ursinus.”

     Armstrong asserts that this has been the best year of his life. Giving advice to others pursuing what they are passionate about, Armstrong says, “Sometimes, creators debate over whether or not doing what you love for a living will ruin that passion for you. If something is important to you, set your life up in a way that doing it every day is inevitable. If you have a gift, requiring yourself to do it often is the only way to reach your potential.”

This article is also published in the Spring 2024 Issue 8 of The Grizzly .

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People & blogs about Moscow

Impressions of an expat.

This blog written in the form of fascinating novel-in-progress. Marco North immerses the readers into particular situations expats can face daily but in literary processed version. The blog is widely popular and even is called as «the work of a modern Chekhov».

Site: http://impressionsofanexpat.blogspot.com

Kidding Herself

Kidding Herself is written from the point of view of a five year old girl and is a child’s guide to going out in Moscow. Herself moved to Moscow from London in 2015 with her British Mama, her Russian Papa and her AngloRusski Big Brother. Find out what she thinks about the Kremlin, Red Square, the zoo, more art galleries than she thinks are strictly necessary and the giant Central Children’s Store.

Site: http://kiddingherself.com

FunnyNotesBlog

Mostly the funny notes of Iva coping with Russian life and culture!

Site: https://funnynotesblog.blogspot.ru

Potty diares

This is a blog of an expat mother of two sons, living in Moscow. The author shares her experience on bringing up kids in Moscow, some useful tips and impressions of the city.

Site: http://potty-diaries.blogspot.co.uk

Arty Generation

This is a site about artists and creative people in Moscow.

Site: https://www.artygeneration.com

If you have a great blog about Moscow to add, send us a link at  [email protected]

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2024 -“Juried Undergraduate Exhibition,” Ridenbaugh Gallery, University of Idaho, Moscow, ID -At Invitation, University of Idaho’s President’s House, University of Idaho, Moscow, ID -“In Medias Res,” Ridenbaugh Gallery, University of Idaho, Moscow, ID (Forthcoming)

2023 -At Invitation, “Painting Show,” Ridenbaugh Gallery, University of Idaho, Moscow, ID -“VAC is Back!”, Reflections Gallery, University of Idaho, Moscow, ID -“Pens, Pencils & Paint,” Ridenbaugh Gallery, University of Idaho, Moscow, ID -At Invitation, University of Idaho’s President’s House, University of Idaho, Moscow, ID. 2023-2024 -“Palouse Plein Air,” Moscow City Council, Moscow, ID. (Winner: City Purchase Award) -“Mirage,” Reflections Gallery, University of Idaho, Moscow, ID. -At Invitation, “Painting Show,” Moscow City Council, Moscow, ID. Fall 2023-Spring 24

2022 -“Figures”, Downtown Arts Center, Honolulu, HI -“Palouse Plein Air”, Moscow City Council, Moscow, ID. (Winner: Best Watercolor) -At Invitation, “Student Painters,” Moscow City Council, Moscow, ID. -At Invitation, “Student Printmakers,” Ridenbaugh Gallery, University of Idaho, Moscow, ID. -“Clay?!”, Ridenbaugh Gallery, University of Idaho, Moscow, ID.

2021 -At Invitation, “Student Show”, Iolan’i Gallery, Windward Community College, Kaneohe, HI.

2020 -“Foundations Juried Exhibition”, The Looking Glass Gallery, Appalachian State University, Boone, NC.

2019 -“Student Show”, The Arts Center, Carrboro, NC.

2024 Bachelor of Fine Arts with an emphasis in Painting and Ceramics, University of Idaho, Moscow, ID. (Forthcoming)

Extracurriculars and Honors

2022-2024 President of Visual Arts Community (VAC), University of Idaho President of Vandal Print Guild (VPG), University of Idaho Volunteer Artist, Vandaljacks, University of Idaho Dean’s List, University of Idaho Alumni Award for Excellence, University of Idaho

2019-2020 Resident Artist, Cannon Hall, Appalachian State University, Boone, NC.

Work Experience/Training

2021-2022 Gallery Attendant, Iolan’i Gallery, Windward Community College, Kaneohe, HI.

Studied Under: Kelly Oakes, Durham, NC. 2019-2020. William Zwick, Honolulu, HI. 2020. Mark Brown, Honolulu, HI, 2020-2022. Daunna Yanoviak, Kailua, HI. 2021- 2022. Mark Norseth, Honolulu, HI. 2021-.

Art: “Introduction to Figure Drawing,” Stacey Leanza, Class, The Arts Center, Carrboro, NC. 2018. “Printmaking; Mono-prints,” Stacey Leanza, Class, The Arts Center, Carrboro, NC. 2018. “Mixed Media,” Stacey Leanza, Class, The Arts Center, Carrboro, NC. 2018. “Introduction to Portrait Drawing,” Kelly Oakes, Class, The Arts Center, Carrboro, NC. 2019. “Painting Portraits in Alla Prima,” Kelly Oakes, Workshop, The Arts Center, Carrboro, NC. 2019. “Demystifying the Modern Portrait,” Marie Rossettie, Class, The Arts Center, Carrboro, NC. 2019. “Intuitive Painting,” Heather Gerni, Workshop, The Arts Center, Carrboro, NC. 2019. “Oil Painting Crash Course,” Vanessa Murray, Workshop, The Arts Center, Carrboro, NC. 2019. “Live Portrait Sessions,” Alla Parsons, Downtown Arts Center, Honolulu, HI. 2023. “Introduction to Watercolor,” Dwayne Adams, Class, Downtown Arts Center, Honolulu, HI. 2023.

Creative Writing: “Writing the Killer Mystery,” C1121, Central Carolina Community College, 2019. “Flash Fiction Made Easy,” C1058, Central Carolina Community College, 2019. “Charting Your Path To Publication,” C1060, Central Carolina Community College, 2019.

Newspapers and Articles

Long, Maryanne, “Windward Artists Turn Impression Into Expression,” Windward O’ahu Voice, February 9th, 2022

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Meet the Creative Writing Fellows

Browse bios, artist statements, and writing excerpts from a sample of Literature Fellows in Creative Writing (2001 – present) for a snapshot of where they were in their writing careers when they received their awards.

The Arts Endowment awards fellowships in poetry in odd years and in prose in even years. 

Marilyn Abildskov

Marilyn Abildskov

Amanda Ajamfar

Amanda Ajamfar

Antonia Angres

Antonia Angress

Key Bird

Key K. Bird

Christopher Castellani

Christopher Castellani

Priyanka Champaneri

Priyanka Champaneri

S. Isabel Choi

S. Isabel Choi

George Choundas

George Choundas

Ashley Davidson

Ash Davidson

John Fulton

John Fulton

Kimberly Garza

Kimberly Garza

Edgar Gomez

Edgar Gomez

John Hallman

J.C. Hallman

Rebecca Hazlewood

Rebecca Hazelwood

Rachel Howard

Rachel Howard

Stay connected to the national endowment for the arts.

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COMMENTS

  1. CREATIVE WRITING FELLOWSHIPS

    The Literature Fellowships program awards grants in prose (fiction and creative nonfiction) and poetry to published creative writers that enable the recipients to set aside time for writing, research, travel, and general career advancement. Grants to individuals are only available in Literature. * Deadline: March 13, 2024.

  2. 44 Fellowships for Creative Writers in Any Career Stage

    The fellowship is for creative writers, including fiction, drama, creative nonfiction, and biography. Applications in poetry will not be accepted. Wallace Stegner Fellowship. The Wallace Stegner Fellowship at Stanford University provides 10 two-year professional fellowships annually: 5 fellowships in fiction writing and 5 fellowships in poetry ...

  3. Wallace Stegner Fellowship

    The Stegner Fellowship is a full-time academic commitment and is not intended to be pursued concurrently with another degree program. The fellowship includes a living stipend, and a fellow's tuition and health insurance are paid for by the Creative Writing Program. A f ellow must live close enough to Stanford in order to attend workshops ...

  4. CREATIVE WRITING FELLOWSHIPS: How to Apply

    Go to Register. (link is external) and click the red button that says "Get Registered Now" at the bottom of the screen. Next, fill out the contact information, choose a Username and Password, and then click "Continue" at the bottom of the screen. Grants.gov will email you a temporary code to verify your email address.

  5. Fellowships

    National Endowment for the Arts Creative Writing Fellowships. What it is: The National Endowment for the Arts Creative Writing Fellowships offer $25,000 grants in fiction, creative nonfiction, and poetry to enable creative writers to set aside time for writing, research, travel, and general career advancement. Who's it for: To be eligible, you have to be a citizen of the United States, you ...

  6. 21 Writing Fellowships for Authors, Journalists and Poets

    Here are 21 writing fellowships to consider. 1. Steinbeck Fellow Program at San José State University. If you're up for a year in San José and need funding to focus on your work of fiction, creative nonfiction, drama or biography, this is a fantastic opportunity. Named in honor of John Steinbeck, this $15,000 fellowship allows writers to ...

  7. Fellowship Positions

    Emory University Creative Writing Fellowship. Two-year fellowship in poetry in lively undergraduate English/Creative Writing Program, beginning Fall 2023. Load 1-2, all workshops; $45,000 salary, and health benefits. Fellow will give a public reading and have access to the Raymond Danowski Poetry Library, a 75,000-volume rare and modern poetry ...

  8. The Wisconsin Institute for Creative Writing Fellowships

    The Hoffman-Halls Emerging Artist Fellowship (the HEAF) is awarded to a second-year MFA candidate in the University of Wisconsin-Madison's Creative Writing MFA program, to fund a third year of study prior to graduation. Poets and fiction writers are eligible for the HEAF in alternating years. In January and February 2022 we are considering ...

  9. 12 Fellowships and Grants for Emerging Writers

    Steinbeck Fellows Program. The Steinbeck Fellowship Program is a one-year fellowship for emerging writers of any age and background to pursue a significant writing project while in residence at SJSU. The fellowship provides a stipend of $15,000, the opportunity to interact with other writers, faculty, and graduate students, and share work in ...

  10. Meet Our 2021 Emerging Writer Fellows

    The nine exceptional recipients of the 2021 The Center for Fiction/Susan Kamil Emerging Writer Fellowships are Joshua Borja, Gina Chung, Caleb Gayle, Senny George, Jared Jackson, Jen Lue, Mary Wang, Katie Yee, and Na Zhong. Each Fellow receives a $5,000 grant, mentorship with a distinguished editor, and publication in the annual fellows anthology.

  11. Applying for a Poetry or Fiction Fellowship

    To be eligible for a Wisconsin Institute for Creative Writing fellowship, you must have completed an MFA or PhD in Creative Writing by August 15th of the fellowship year. For those who pursued a graduate degree in creative writing outside the USA or Canada, in a country where an MA in Creative Writing (rather than an MFA) is the standard ...

  12. CAAPP Creative Writing Fellowship

    The Fellowship in Creative Writing at the Center for African American Poetry and Poetics is a two-year fellowship for poets who have completed an MFA or PhD and have published no more than one full-length book. While the primary goal is to provide an early-career poet with time and space to pursue their own creative work, the fellow also ...

  13. Olive B. O'Connor Fellowship in Creative Writing

    She holds an M.F.A. in creative writing from Vanderbilt University and is the 2022-23 Olive B. O'Connor Fellow in fiction at Colgate. She was the 2021 winner of The Iowa Review Award in fiction, and her work appears in The Iowa Review, Joyland Magazine, and others. She is currently working on her first novel as well as a story collection.

  14. Wyoming Arts Council now accepting fellowship applications

    CHEYENNE - The Wyoming Arts Council is now accepting applications for fellowships in visual arts, performing arts and creative writing. Fellowships are open to Wyoming residents and are merit ...

  15. Creative Writing Fellowship

    The Competition for the 2024 CINTAS Foundation Fellowship in Creative Writing is now OPEN. (deadline May 1, 2024) APPLY HERE. Candidates may submit proposals in the field of creative writing. Candidates are encouraged to send their materials electronically to the email address below or ship by express mail only if necessary.

  16. List of Writer's Conferences and Workshops in North America: Updated

    Here's our list of the 200+ best writer's conferences and workshops in North America for 2018 and 2019. You can quickly search our curated list to find the best events near you.

  17. Creative Writing Program Director Roy Scranton wins Guggenheim Fellowship

    Associate Professor of English and Creative Writing Program Director Dr. Roy Scranton has been named a 2024 Fellow of the John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation, and awarded a grant supporting his forthcoming book Ethical Pessimism: Climate Change and the Limits of Narrative.Now in its 99th year, the John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation recognizes & awards monetary prizes to the 2024 ...

  18. CREATIVE WRITING FELLOWSHIPS: Frequently Asked Questions

    A: No. The Fellowships Program is designed to help published creative writers set aside time to write; there is no guarantee that it will lead to publication of a book. In order for your writing sample to be reviewed by our panel, you must meet our eligibility requirements. Q: I'm self-published.

  19. Watson Fellowship Winner Tommy Armstrong '20: Travels and Reflections

    The Ursinus website states that the Thomas J. Watson Fellowship is a "one-year grant for purposeful, independent exploration outside the United States, awarded to graduating seniors nominated by one of 41 partner institutions." Armstrong graduated with a major in English and minors in Film and Creative Writing.

  20. People & blogs about Moscow

    This is a site about artists and creative people in Moscow. Site: https://www.artygeneration.com. Add yours. If you have a great blog about Moscow to add, send us a link at ...

  21. CV

    Creative Writing: "Writing the Killer Mystery," C1121, Central Carolina Community College, 2019. "Flash Fiction Made Easy," C1058, Central Carolina Community College, 2019. "Charting Your Path To Publication," C1060, Central Carolina Community College, 2019. Newspapers and Articles.

  22. Music, cinema and more: how the city helps creative industries

    The Moscow Government has allocated 100 million rubles for grants. The city supports creative industries not only financially, but also in promoting their products and services across the country and the world, providing market analytics, education, creating infrastructure for successful work, conditions for the formation of a creative community.

  23. Meet the Creative Writing Fellows

    Meet the Creative Writing Fellows. Browse bios, artist statements, and writing excerpts from a sample of Literature Fellows in Creative Writing (2001 - present) for a snapshot of where they were in their writing careers when they received their awards. The Arts Endowment awards fellowships in poetry in odd years and in prose in even years.