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Hilton Hotels: Brand Differentiation through Customer Relationship Management

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Hilton hotels: brand differentiation through customer relationship management description.

This case analyzes the Hilton Hotels Corporation's CRM strategy at a key juncture in its history, immediately after the firm has been taken private by Blackstone. The case provides students with a comprehensive history of the evolution and IT enablers of Hilton's CRM Initiative, as well as the proprietary OnQ enterprise system. The case thus offers a rare opportunity to engage in a longitudinal evaluation of the firm's CRM initiative, and to enable students to propose the future evolution of the initiative based on their analysis.

Case Description Hilton Hotels: Brand Differentiation through Customer Relationship Management

Strategic managment tools used in case study analysis of hilton hotels: brand differentiation through customer relationship management, step 1. problem identification in hilton hotels: brand differentiation through customer relationship management case study, step 2. external environment analysis - pestel / pest / step analysis of hilton hotels: brand differentiation through customer relationship management case study, step 3. industry specific / porter five forces analysis of hilton hotels: brand differentiation through customer relationship management case study, step 4. evaluating alternatives / swot analysis of hilton hotels: brand differentiation through customer relationship management case study, step 5. porter value chain analysis / vrio / vrin analysis hilton hotels: brand differentiation through customer relationship management case study, step 6. recommendations hilton hotels: brand differentiation through customer relationship management case study, step 7. basis of recommendations for hilton hotels: brand differentiation through customer relationship management case study, quality & on time delivery.

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Case Analysis of Hilton Hotels: Brand Differentiation through Customer Relationship Management

Hilton Hotels: Brand Differentiation through Customer Relationship Management is a Harvard Business (HBR) Case Study on Strategy & Execution , Texas Business School provides HBR case study assignment help for just $9. Texas Business School(TBS) case study solution is based on HBR Case Study Method framework, TBS expertise & global insights. Hilton Hotels: Brand Differentiation through Customer Relationship Management is designed and drafted in a manner to allow the HBR case study reader to analyze a real-world problem by putting reader into the position of the decision maker. Hilton Hotels: Brand Differentiation through Customer Relationship Management case study will help professionals, MBA, EMBA, and leaders to develop a broad and clear understanding of casecategory challenges. Hilton Hotels: Brand Differentiation through Customer Relationship Management will also provide insight into areas such as – wordlist , strategy, leadership, sales and marketing, and negotiations.

Case Study Solutions Background Work

Hilton Hotels: Brand Differentiation through Customer Relationship Management case study solution is focused on solving the strategic and operational challenges the protagonist of the case is facing. The challenges involve – evaluation of strategic options, key role of Strategy & Execution, leadership qualities of the protagonist, and dynamics of the external environment. The challenge in front of the protagonist, of Hilton Hotels: Brand Differentiation through Customer Relationship Management, is to not only build a competitive position of the organization but also to sustain it over a period of time.

Strategic Management Tools Used in Case Study Solution

The Hilton Hotels: Brand Differentiation through Customer Relationship Management case study solution requires the MBA, EMBA, executive, professional to have a deep understanding of various strategic management tools such as SWOT Analysis, PESTEL Analysis / PEST Analysis / STEP Analysis, Porter Five Forces Analysis, Go To Market Strategy, BCG Matrix Analysis, Porter Value Chain Analysis, Ansoff Matrix Analysis, VRIO / VRIN and Marketing Mix Analysis.

Texas Business School Approach to Strategy & Execution Solutions

In the Texas Business School, Hilton Hotels: Brand Differentiation through Customer Relationship Management case study solution – following strategic tools are used - SWOT Analysis, PESTEL Analysis / PEST Analysis / STEP Analysis, Porter Five Forces Analysis, Go To Market Strategy, BCG Matrix Analysis, Porter Value Chain Analysis, Ansoff Matrix Analysis, VRIO / VRIN and Marketing Mix Analysis. We have additionally used the concept of supply chain management and leadership framework to build a comprehensive case study solution for the case – Hilton Hotels: Brand Differentiation through Customer Relationship Management

Step 1 – Problem Identification of Hilton Hotels: Brand Differentiation through Customer Relationship Management - Harvard Business School Case Study

The first step to solve HBR Hilton Hotels: Brand Differentiation through Customer Relationship Management case study solution is to identify the problem present in the case. The problem statement of the case is provided in the beginning of the case where the protagonist is contemplating various options in the face of numerous challenges that Crm Hilton is facing right now. Even though the problem statement is essentially – “Strategy & Execution” challenge but it has impacted by others factors such as communication in the organization, uncertainty in the external environment, leadership in Crm Hilton, style of leadership and organization structure, marketing and sales, organizational behavior, strategy, internal politics, stakeholders priorities and more.

Step 2 – External Environment Analysis

Texas Business School approach of case study analysis – Conclusion, Reasons, Evidences - provides a framework to analyze every HBR case study. It requires conducting robust external environmental analysis to decipher evidences for the reasons presented in the Hilton Hotels: Brand Differentiation through Customer Relationship Management. The external environment analysis of Hilton Hotels: Brand Differentiation through Customer Relationship Management will ensure that we are keeping a tab on the macro-environment factors that are directly and indirectly impacting the business of the firm.

What is PESTEL Analysis? Briefly Explained

PESTEL stands for political, economic, social, technological, environmental and legal factors that impact the external environment of firm in Hilton Hotels: Brand Differentiation through Customer Relationship Management case study. PESTEL analysis of " Hilton Hotels: Brand Differentiation through Customer Relationship Management" can help us understand why the organization is performing badly, what are the factors in the external environment that are impacting the performance of the organization, and how the organization can either manage or mitigate the impact of these external factors.

How to do PESTEL / PEST / STEP Analysis? What are the components of PESTEL Analysis?

As mentioned above PESTEL Analysis has six elements – political, economic, social, technological, environmental, and legal. All the six elements are explained in context with Hilton Hotels: Brand Differentiation through Customer Relationship Management macro-environment and how it impacts the businesses of the firm.

How to do PESTEL Analysis for Hilton Hotels: Brand Differentiation through Customer Relationship Management

To do comprehensive PESTEL analysis of case study – Hilton Hotels: Brand Differentiation through Customer Relationship Management , we have researched numerous components under the six factors of PESTEL analysis.

Political Factors that Impact Hilton Hotels: Brand Differentiation through Customer Relationship Management

Political factors impact seven key decision making areas – economic environment, socio-cultural environment, rate of innovation & investment in research & development, environmental laws, legal requirements, and acceptance of new technologies.

Government policies have significant impact on the business environment of any country. The firm in “ Hilton Hotels: Brand Differentiation through Customer Relationship Management ” needs to navigate these policy decisions to create either an edge for itself or reduce the negative impact of the policy as far as possible.

Data safety laws – The countries in which Crm Hilton is operating, firms are required to store customer data within the premises of the country. Crm Hilton needs to restructure its IT policies to accommodate these changes. In the EU countries, firms are required to make special provision for privacy issues and other laws.

Competition Regulations – Numerous countries have strong competition laws both regarding the monopoly conditions and day to day fair business practices. Hilton Hotels: Brand Differentiation through Customer Relationship Management has numerous instances where the competition regulations aspects can be scrutinized.

Import restrictions on products – Before entering the new market, Crm Hilton in case study Hilton Hotels: Brand Differentiation through Customer Relationship Management" should look into the import restrictions that may be present in the prospective market.

Export restrictions on products – Apart from direct product export restrictions in field of technology and agriculture, a number of countries also have capital controls. Crm Hilton in case study “ Hilton Hotels: Brand Differentiation through Customer Relationship Management ” should look into these export restrictions policies.

Foreign Direct Investment Policies – Government policies favors local companies over international policies, Crm Hilton in case study “ Hilton Hotels: Brand Differentiation through Customer Relationship Management ” should understand in minute details regarding the Foreign Direct Investment policies of the prospective market.

Corporate Taxes – The rate of taxes is often used by governments to lure foreign direct investments or increase domestic investment in a certain sector. Corporate taxation can be divided into two categories – taxes on profits and taxes on operations. Taxes on profits number is important for companies that already have a sustainable business model, while taxes on operations is far more significant for companies that are looking to set up new plants or operations.

Tariffs – Chekout how much tariffs the firm needs to pay in the “ Hilton Hotels: Brand Differentiation through Customer Relationship Management ” case study. The level of tariffs will determine the viability of the business model that the firm is contemplating. If the tariffs are high then it will be extremely difficult to compete with the local competitors. But if the tariffs are between 5-10% then Crm Hilton can compete against other competitors.

Research and Development Subsidies and Policies – Governments often provide tax breaks and other incentives for companies to innovate in various sectors of priority. Managers at Hilton Hotels: Brand Differentiation through Customer Relationship Management case study have to assess whether their business can benefit from such government assistance and subsidies.

Consumer protection – Different countries have different consumer protection laws. Managers need to clarify not only the consumer protection laws in advance but also legal implications if the firm fails to meet any of them.

Political System and Its Implications – Different political systems have different approach to free market and entrepreneurship. Managers need to assess these factors even before entering the market.

Freedom of Press is critical for fair trade and transparency. Countries where freedom of press is not prevalent there are high chances of both political and commercial corruption.

Corruption level – Crm Hilton needs to assess the level of corruptions both at the official level and at the market level, even before entering a new market. To tackle the menace of corruption – a firm should have a clear SOP that provides managers at each level what to do when they encounter instances of either systematic corruption or bureaucrats looking to take bribes from the firm.

Independence of judiciary – It is critical for fair business practices. If a country doesn’t have independent judiciary then there is no point entry into such a country for business.

Government attitude towards trade unions – Different political systems and government have different attitude towards trade unions and collective bargaining. The firm needs to assess – its comfort dealing with the unions and regulations regarding unions in a given market or industry. If both are on the same page then it makes sense to enter, otherwise it doesn’t.

Economic Factors that Impact Hilton Hotels: Brand Differentiation through Customer Relationship Management

Social factors that impact hilton hotels: brand differentiation through customer relationship management, technological factors that impact hilton hotels: brand differentiation through customer relationship management, environmental factors that impact hilton hotels: brand differentiation through customer relationship management, legal factors that impact hilton hotels: brand differentiation through customer relationship management, step 3 – industry specific analysis, what is porter five forces analysis, step 4 – swot analysis / internal environment analysis, step 5 – porter value chain / vrio / vrin analysis, step 6 – evaluating alternatives & recommendations, step 7 – basis for recommendations, references :: hilton hotels: brand differentiation through customer relationship management case study solution.

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  • Advertising & Branding ,
  • Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) ,

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Hilton Wordwide Case Analysis

Hilton Worldwide Holdings Inc., formerly Hilton Hotels Corporation, is an American multinational hospitality company that manages and franchises a broad portfolio of hotels and resorts. Founded by Conrad Hilton in 1919, the corporation is now led by Christopher J. Nassetta.

Hilton is headquartered in Tysons Corner, Virginia. As of September 2018, its portfolio includes more than 5,500 properties (including timeshare properties) with over 894,000 rooms in 109 countries and territories. Prior to their December 2013 IPO, Hilton was ranked as the 36th largest privately held company in the United States by Forbes.

Hilton has 15 brands across different market segments, including Conrad Hotels & Resorts, Canopy by Hilton, Curio – A Collection by Hilton, Hilton Hotels & Resorts, DoubleTree by Hilton, Embassy Suites Hotels, Hilton Garden Inn, Hampton by Hilton, Homewood Suites by Hilton, Home2 Suites by Hilton, Hilton Grand Vacations, Waldorf Astoria Hotels & Resorts, Tru by Hilton, Tapestry Collection by Hilton, and Motto by Hilton.

On December 12, 2013, Hilton again became a public company, raising an estimated $2.35 billion in its second IPO. At the time, The Blackstone Group held a 45.8 percent stake in the company. In October 2016, HNA Group agreed to acquire a 25 percent equity interest in Hilton from Blackstone. The transaction was expected to close in the first quarter of 2017. Hilton’s largest stockholders are HNA Group, Blackstone, and Wellington Management Group, which own 25%, 15.2%, and 6.7% of Hilton common stock respectively.

Hilton was founded by Conrad Hilton in Cisco, Texas, in 1919 and had its headquarters in Beverly Hills, California, from 1969 until 2009. In August 2009, the company moved to Tysons Corner, unincorporated Fairfax County, Virginia, near McLean.

Hilton Worldwide Case Study

Hilton Case Study Examples

Swot analysis of hilton hotel.

SWOT analysis of Hilton hotel Strengths • Hilton Hotel Corporation (HHC) is a well established organization and industry leader in the hotel, hospitality and gaming industry • HHC is well diversified across the industry with hotels in the high end, business and mid-priced classes in their product mix • HHC also possesses solid integration features […]

Hilton HHonor (case analysis)

What is the currency being used by Hilton HHonors and how much is the currency worth from Hilton HHonors’ perspective? From the consumer’s perspective? Hilton HHonors is a program run by Hilton Hotel Corporation and Hilton International. The currency used by Hilton HHonors is points earned from this loyalty program in order to reward loyal […]

Case – Hilton

Brian Lowe Case: Hilton 1. If the company had dropped product 103 as of January 1, 2004, what effect would the action have had on the $158,000 for the first six months of 2004? The variable costs associated with product 103 will go away when the product line is eliminated. However, the fixed costs will […]

Hilton SWOT Analysis

Strengths. Hilton hotel has many hotels’ brands distributed all over the world. It has more than three thousand seven hundred and fifty hotels in eighty four countries worldwide. They include “Waldorf Astoria Hotels and Resorts, Conrad Hotels and Resorts, Hilton, Doubletree, Embassy Suites Hotels, Hilton Garden Inn, Hampton Inn and Suites Hotels, Homewood Suites by […]

Hilton Hotel

Hilton hotel is a global hospitality company with more than five hundred hotels and resorts in seventy eight countries in six continents. It has lodgings ranging from luxurious full-service hotels and resorts to extended-stay suites and mid-sized hotels (Hilton Worldwide, 2012). The hotel was the first to develop the concept of franchising hotels. It has […]

Macro environment case of hilton

Price elasticity, demand and revenue Before starting to talk about price elasticity, demand. Venue and the relations between them, it is necessary to explain the definition of each of them. According to Boston (2014: presentation) price can be inelastic or elastic, so inelastic means that a 1 % change in the price of a good […]

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Case Study: How Hilton uses social listening to win customers

Anna Bredava

  • Brand monitoring
  • Social Media Monitoring

In this social listening case study, we explore how Hilton uses social listening to provide a perfect customer experience, make killer marketing campaigns and build relationships.

Hilton Case Study

Social customer support, social marketing insights.

Hilton is one of the most famous hospitality brands in the world. Hilton Worldwide owns twelve portfolio brands that include over 4,100 hotels and over 680,000 rooms in 91 countries. With that many customers scattered around the world, Hilton is challenged with providing the most convenient channels of communication.

In this social media case study, I wanted to explore how Hilton uses social listening. Unsurprisingly, more and more Hilton guests are heading to social media to voice their concerns, require customer support, ask for recommendations, or give a praise to the staff. Hilton had to find a way to follow their customers and decided to build a social listening strategy to always be on alert and respond whenever, wherever to whomever.

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hilton case study solution

On average, Hilton Hotels receives about 1.5 thousand Twitter mentions every day. Most of them are related to special offers promoted by tourist companies, advertising, news, and guests sharing pictures and tagging the location. As you see, most of these mentions do not require an immediate response.

The Positive Sentiment appears to be more common among social media users than Negative when talking about Hilton, which is good news for them!

hilton case study solution

And the most popular platform of discussion for them is, unsurprisingly, Twitter.

hilton case study solution

So let’s see if Hilton takes these insights into account when building its social media strategy.

hilton case study solution

Oftentimes people post about their positive experience in Hilton: they show their cosy room or a beautiful view, they thank the staff for their services publically or simply say how happy they are with their trip. This kind of mentions doesn’t require a response per se, but acknowledging positive experiences of your customers makes a brand seem more humane, genuine, and caring. Moreover, if your customer has some kind of social media following, chances are your response won’t go unnoticed. That’s why it’s a good idea to acknowledge your customers’ positive mentions. And Hilton does it perfectly!

hilton case study solution

But it’s not all roses and peaches: as with any big brand, there are occasional complaints. And in hospitality, complaints from clients are extremely important. You can deal with a broken toaster later, but if your living space is not in a satisfactory state, it becomes your top priority. That’s why time is extremely important here.

hilton case study solution

Messages like this one are not just a customer service issue — they can potentially damage the reputation of the brand. That’s why it’s extremely important to respond to them as soon as possible. The disappointed guests need an immediate answer — and if they don’t get one, they will be even harsher with their critique. The average response time for a brand to reply on social media is 10 hours, while the average user will only wait 4 hours.

On average, Hilton Hotels answers 3.3 tweets in one hour, and the average time between a tweet and a response equals 37.3 minutes (after analyzing 872 tweets during one month).

That’s the power of social listening. It enables Hilton’s social media team to react and engage in real time, depending only on manpower. Hilton made a decision to combine their social customer support with call centre and in-app support through Expion tool to make their customer service experience perfect.  

“We took a different approach than a lot of companies. We want to help our guests no matter how they come to us. No matter how they want help — in the app, at the front desk, or on Twitter. We are there where they want us,” Vanessa Sain-Dieguez, ‎Social Business Lead & Strategist for Hilton Worldwide notes.

Hilton’s guest service center is housed within their call center. Their social team monitors all Twitter mentions around the clock and aims to engage with guests within 30 minutes of a tweet being sent.

Hilton monitors all its brands and hotel level Twitter accounts and looks for what is being said and when to engage. Even if a guest tweets about Hilton, but doesn’t identify them by their handle, Hilton will pick up on the tweet and respond. Monitoring untagged mentions is extremely important. For example, here’s a comparison of the number of tagged and untagged mentions.

hilton case study solution

“We want to be available to the customer wherever they are. It just comes down to customer preference, whether they want to tweet our main account or one of our hotels, or don’t @ us at all — and monitoring it all,” remarks Sain-Dieguez.

From the very first response, Hilton aims to resolve all issues within 12 hours, which is an incredibly robust resolution timeframe given that Hilton’s customer service has to communicate with hotels around the globe.

“We recently had a guest who arrived in her hotel room and tweeted a picture of her closet that was not a standard size. Her dress was pooling on the ground, and she wanted it to remain wrinkle free for her meeting the following day. We saw that tweet come through, and within an hour had her in a new room with a full size closet,” Sain-Dieguez explains.

But it’s not just about one time reaction. Hilton uses social listening across different platforms to gather valuable insights for their overall brand strategy. They ensure that guest experience gets turned into actionable insight. All guest comments become part of their reporting. That feedback is then bubbled up to the brands who use it in their strategic planning.

The feedback Hilton gets from social media not only informs their managing strategy, but also enhances their marketing campaigns. For example, while I was working on this article, Hilton launched a new marketing campaign titled Expect Better which gathered a lot of buzz for the brand. But the mentions of the campaign don’t always include the official hashtag #ExpectBetter or Hilton’s twitter handle. By monitoring words associated with the campaign, for example, such combination as Hilton + Kendrick, their social media marketing team is able to observe and analyze conversations around the campaign and evaluate its success.

hilton case study solution

Hilton Suggests

Hilton Suggest is one of the favourite subjects for a social listening case study among marketers. Why? Because it's a unique ideas that successfully uses social listening in a creative way.

For Hilton, social listening is not just a helping hand to inform their marketing strategy, it is the core and essence of the social media marketing strategy. Thanks to social listening, they were able to create @HiltonSuggests.

Hilton Suggest campaign goes beyond reacting to someone else’s social posts and takes initiative. The main idea behind the campaign is to aid people without any ulterior motives to make a sale. Many marketing specialists say that brands today find themselves in the age of sincerity and authenticity. Millennials and generation Z who grew up with the Internet are no longer convinced by straightforward in-your-face advertising, they want to engage and build relationships. That’s exactly what Hilton Suggests does. But what is it exactly?

Hilton Suggests is a helpful concierge, available for everyone travelling to or around more than 115 cities worldwide. Launched in 2009, the Hilton Worldwide initiative is a collection of Hilton employees who volunteer their best local advice with the aim of surprising and delighting travelers on Twitter.

hilton case study solution

The unique service isn’t based on customers tweeting to @HiltonSuggests and asking for recommendations. Instead, the inquiries are found strictly through social listening for anyone who’s planning a trip to one of the participating cities, and not just Hilton guests. Based on thorough research powered by social listening, the team created specific listening rules to find and reach travelers who might never expect to hear from Hilton.

Sabrina Callahan, director of social media planning and integration at Hilton says that after years of social listening, Hilton developed a “travel excitement” layer of keywords in early 2017 based on past tweets and team member feedback. With that research, Hilton compiled “a rather lengthy list of words and phrases that people use while sharing excitement and anticipation for an upcoming trip.”

The unique quality behind Hilton Suggest is that the people writing recommendations are not a specially formed social media team — they are regular Hilton employees (who passed extensive training, of course) who are excited to share their love for the local attractions with others. And that adds to the authenticity of the program - you don’t simply google “top places to see” in Vienna, you get a personal touch and recommendations tailored to your interests.

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By making the first step and reaching out, Hilton is able to promote their brand to people who weren’t aware of it before. Callahan says, “Sometimes travelers will take photos and tag us to say thanks for the great recommendation, and that is a huge win.” Maybe next time a person will remember the hotel that helped them to experience their destination in the best way possible and will choose to stay there.

Hilton proves that social listening can help us to improve our routine activities but also create something new, which would never happen without the power of social media monitoring. What can be learned from this social listening case study?

Don’t ignore your customers. If you see that they are choosing social media as a channel for communication ( and they are ), you should give them the way to reach you.

Let social data help you. Social listening isn’t a one-time deal - the insights you get from social media can affect your company's strategy and marketing decisions.

Use social listening creatively. Remember, that the whole point of social media is engagement, and social listening can give you opportunities to engage. Don’t neglect them.

What about you? What did you learn from this social listening case study? Let’s discuss it in the comments!

Content Marketer at Awario 

When I'm not wasting my time on social media, I'm writing about them. My topics of interest are the effects of social media on our communication and the benefit it brings to marketing specialists. My motto is that you can never stop learning about social media marketing just as there can never be too many puppy gifs in a blog post.

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hilton case study solution

Hilton Hotel Worldwide: A Case Study Exploring Corporate Social Responsibility and Stakeholder Management

  • By: Antonia Noonan & Caddie Putnam Rankin
  • Publisher: International CHRIE
  • Publication year: 2017
  • Online pub date: January 15, 2020
  • Discipline: Business Ethics (general) , Corporate Social Responsibility , Hospitality, Travel & Tourism Management
  • DOI: https:// doi. org/10.4135/9781529715828
  • Contains: Content Partners | Teaching Notes Length: 7,078 words Region: Global Originally Published In: Noonan , A. , & Rankin , C. P. ( 2017 ). Hilton Hotel Worldwide: A case study exploring corporate social responsibility and stakeholder management . Journal of Hospitality & Tourism Cases , 5 (4) , 15 – 27 . Industry: Accommodation and food service activities Type: Indirect case info Organization: Hilton Hotel Worldwide Organization Size: Large info Online ISBN: 9781529715828 Copyright: © 2017 International Council on Hotel, Restaurant, and Institutional Education (ICHRIE). All rights reserved. More information Less information

Teaching Notes

How to be socially responsible is a growing concern for the hospitality industry. This case study provides examples of how Hilton Hotel Worldwide (HHW) fulfils its responsibility to stakeholders and stockholders by reviewing a myriad of fiduciary, legal, ethical, community, and global concerns. From an industry perspective, HHWs’ approach to internal and external stakeholder concerns has promoted positive industry-wide change. In addition, this case study allows the reader to conceptualize the concept of Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) in the context of the hospitality sector by reviewing the policies and practices carried out by Hilton Hotel Worldwide. Reflecting on the HHW’S CSR engagement and CSR theory, the reader is asked to comment an upcoming shareholder referendum that would tie executive compensation to CSR performance.

Introduction

Case dilemma.

As a hospitality student, your interest in the industry led you to purchase Hilton Hotel Worldwide (HHW) stock. You are a proud HHW shareholder. In the time you have been a shareholder, you have been pleased with the investment. In an upcoming HHW shareholders meeting, a proxy ballot will be introduced to vote on a proposal to include Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) performance among the factors considered in awarding executive pay.

The clause states:

The shareholders of Hilton Hotel Worldwide request the Board’s Compensation Committee to include corporate social action as one of the performance measures for senior executive’s compensation under the Company’s incentive plans. Corporate social action is defined as how environmental and social concerns are addressed, monitored and integrated into corporate strategy over the long term. 1

From your hospitality courses, you are aware of the efforts the industry has made addressing CSR issues, however, you are not specifically familiar with HHW history of addressing CSR concerns and the company’s ongoing level of commitment. You decide to conduct research in order to make an informed decision on the shareholder resolution. You start with a review of the CSR theories introduced in your Eco-Tourism class. Then you conduct additional research on the history of CSR in the hospitality industry, HHW reaction and resolution to CSR conflicts and finally, consider if an additional CSR focus will provide HHW with a competitive advantage. Once you review your research, you will make your decision.

Corporate Social Responsibility Theoretical Perspective

Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) is focused on business’ obligations and behavior towards society. Some narrow the scope to business stakeholders such as employees and customers while others more broadly include the environment and sustainability. However, most agree, CSR is a difficult concept to define. It overlaps with “other concepts such as corporate citizenship, sustainable business, environmental responsibility, the triple bottom line; social and environmental accountability; business ethics and corporate accountability” (Broomhill, 2007, p. 6). Carroll’s (1979) widely used definition of CSR claims that “CSR involves the conduct of a business so that it is economically profitable, law abiding, ethical and socially supportive…The CSR firm should strive to make a profit, obey the law, be ethical, and be a good corporate citizen” (Carroll, 1999, p. 286). Porter and Kramer (2002, 2011) suggest that by incorporating CSR into business practice, organizations can achieve a competitive advantage over their industry rivals (see Figure 1 ).

Adam Smiths’ “invisible hand” allegory contends that it is each person’s responsibility to “render the annual revenue of society as great as he can” and by pursuing and acting in one’s self-interest is the best interest for society. In pursuit of self-interests, it is understood that an individual will be acting in a moral and just fashion in and thereby, in a socially responsible way. However, Smith points out, no matter how noble or righteous the cause, executives (corporations) do not have the right to be generous with others money (Smith, 1994).

Similarly, Milton Friedman’s (1970) shareholder theory asserts that shareholders are the owners of a company, and the firm’s sole obligation is to increase profits for the owners; the firm’s objective and fiduciary obligation is to maximize shareholder wealth. If CSR initiatives increase profits then shareholders should implement such initiatives.

In contrast, stakeholder theory argues that there are other parties concerns that should be considered, including governmental, associations, communities, suppliers, employees, and customers (Freeman, 1984). From the viewpoint of the stakeholder theory, the HHW board of directors, operators and hotel managers are morally obligated to balance the interests of shareholders (owners) and other stakeholders because as operators, they have a fiduciary and ethical responsibility toward all stakeholders

Carroll’s (1991) Pyramid of Social Responsibility describes four kinds of social responsibility that build upon each other and can be depicted in a pyramid. At the top of the pyramid is philanthropic responsibilities (Corporate Social Performance – managerial discretion), which is described as being a being a good corporate citizen, promoting behaviors that encourage goodwill and human welfare. Carroll (1979) believed philanthropic responsibilities were not expectations like economic, legal and ethical responsibilities located in the base of the pyramid (Velasquez, 2014). From a philanthropic responsibility viewpoint (the top of the pyramid), an organization contributes resources to the community/society in an effort to improve quality of life.

All the texts in the framework chart are written inside rectangular boxes. On the left, the first point is “Corporate Social Responsibility” which is written vertically. This is connected to four points to its right, written one below the other, namely, “Fiduciary,” “Legal,” “Ethical,” and “Global & Community.” There is a rightward arrowhead from those points that points to “COMPETITIVE ADVANTAGE?”

Figure 1: CSR Analysis Competitive Advantage Framework

An image shows CSR analysis using competitive advantage framework.

Corporate Social Responsibility in the Hospitality Industry

It is commonplace to have CSR topics introduced during the orientation of new employees and presented as a topic in management training. For example, corporate management companies may have the resources to provide extensive CSR training and development while smaller companies and single ownership hotels may not be able address CSR topics beyond employee orientation. Such inconsistencies stem from fragmented nature of the hospitality industry and make the development of a universally accepted, industry wide training programs difficult. Kazim (2009) affirms that one of the biggest challenges and barriers to the implementation CSR in the hospitality industry is the lack of managerial awareness and training at the property level. Another reason for the limited understanding of CSR is due to the current trend of touting environmental sustainability efforts by communicating CSR actions as sustainable hospitality (Levy & Park, 2011).

Lee and Tsang (2013) and Knani (2013) assert that while CSR is a growing challenge in the hospitality industry, “the understanding of ethical perception and moral position of all stakeholders should be accentuated” (Lee et al., 2013, p. 239) in the business culture from the individual property unit to the boardroom. By the nature of its business, the hospitality industry has always been susceptible to unethical practices, as employees are frequently confronted with morally and ethically ambiguous situations. These dilemmas are not, however, limited to the property level. The larger hotel brands are publically held corporations that own, manage or franchise hotels. Public sector scrutiny from a myriad of stakeholders makes hospitality boards of directors, corporate executives, operators, owners and employees susceptible to lack of and/or questionable CSR, namely CSR motivation and questionable methodologies of ranking CSR engagement against competition. Other negative outcomes have been brought to the public’s attention and have provided a framework for organizational change and improved best practices for the industry.

A single hotel’s success in their market can be impacted by positive and negative reactions to the corporate brand. For example, negative brand publicity in responsibilities may create opportunities for the competition to exploit a perceived weakness. HHW suffered from such public scrutiny from sex trafficking accusations in 1998, corporate espionage scandal in 2009 and more recently in 2015 amidst concerns whether HHW officers and directors breached their fiduciary duties and caused damage to the company and its shareholders 2 . However, in the wake of turmoil, controversy and public dissidence, HHW successfully integrated a robust corporate code of conduct, introduced a proprietary environmental reporting program, and integrated a company-wide Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) communication platform. These initiatives created opportunities and provoked changes in basic practices to overcome public grievances and elevate HHW to a CSR leader in the hospitality industry.

Fiduciary, legal, ethical, and global/community responsibilities can provide the hospitality industry with a competitive advantage over their rivals. In an effort to evaluate hospitality CSR and the prospect that CSR actions can provide one hotel or brand a competitive advantage over their rivals, this case study focuses on HHW CSR engagement in the area of fiduciary, legal, ethical, and global/community responsibilities.

Fiduciary Responsibilities

The primary responsibility of any organization is to survive. Survival is, more often than not, based on an organization’s ability to remain fiscally responsible. In recent years, management of hotels has moved from an owned and managed model to a model where the owner hires a management company to oversee the operation of the asset. Similarly, HHW has also moved to this model to reduced capital and increase shareholder worth by focusing on high value added activities like managing hotels without owning the asset. As a management company, the operator is an “agent” and therefore assumes fiduciary obligation to maximize profits and to inform ownership of how profits are achieved. In addition, central to the owner-management relationship is management’s duty to side with ownership priorities – to choose the principal’s (owner’s) interest over their own interests (Friedman, 1970).

Moving from an owner-management to a franchiser-management model, more than ever before, the customer is the primary asset to build shareholder wealth. An example of HHW commitment to focus on the customer and build customer loyalty to gain a competitive advantage was the creation of Hilton’s proprietary customer information system called OnQ 3 . Introduced in 2004, OnQ provided state of the art guest recognition, offered guest convenience and efficiency through web based check in as well as offering the option of using time saving kiosks for hotel check in and check out.

Despite these strengths in building their fiduciary responsibilities, some weakness can be noted. As a publically traded company, and similar to the owner-management relationship, the HHW Board of Directors has a fiduciary responsibility to its shareholders and to maximize, where possible, their profits. The directors and shareholders both shared in the benefits of the leveraged buy-out sale of HHW to Blackstone in 2007. Shareholders overwhelming approved the transaction, receiving $47.50 per share, which was 40 percent higher than the stock price the day before the acquisition was announced (Clausing, 2007). Despite the shareholder goodwill gained from the sale, and a self-imposed code of conduct 4 , HHW’s Board has gained unfavorable attention and is under scrutiny for unethical business practices. In March, 2015, the Shareholders Foundation announced an investigation on behalf of current long-term investors over potential breaches of fiduciary duties by HHW officers and directors causing damage to the company and its shareholders. While little public information is available regarding the details and status of investigation, the insinuation of misconduct has had little effect as HHW stock. In fact in mid-April 2015, HHW reached an all-time high—reflecting an increase of 16.9% year-to-date 5 .

Legal Responsibilities

In common law, the innkeeper was required to provide food, lodging and safety for its guests. Today, hotels are still liable as innkeepers adding the additional provision that the innkeeper must also provide the service of food and lodging in a non-discriminatory manner. While innkeepers are not insurers for the safely of their guests, innkeepers laws impose a duty to provide reasonable care in promoting their safety. These elementary innkeeper’s laws have been tested by disgruntled guests in a plethora of cases of claims ranging from injuries caused by defects in guest rooms to emotional distress caused by not having a room available upon check in. In such cases, courts generally uphold that an innkeeper owes a guest the duty of maintaining the premises of the hotel in reasonably safe conditions, taking care not to expose them to danger. Other legal responsibilities include anti-trust issues, franchise agreements, meeting and sleeping room contracts and labor disputes.

The Corporate Governance section of HHW 2013–2014 Annual Corporate Responsibility Report specifies that Hilton views legal compliance as an “opportunity to strengthen the communities where we live, work and travel” 6 . To further illustrate the company’s commitment, the report details companywide standards that create a safe and healthy environment for team members and guests, specific legalese regarding majority owner representation, board compliance, and majority board voting provisions. Furthermore, the Corporate Responsibility Report describes “reporting and investigation procedures to promote legal compliance and ethical behavior globally” that is verified by an independent audit committee to ensure legal compliance is authentic. According to researchers Font, Walmsley, Cogotti, McCombes, and Häusler (2012), HHW is the only hotel chain that permits an external audit of its CSR reporting.

To ensure all levels of associates are informed about pertinent legal matters, the HHW Corporate Responsibility Report identifies specific training topics that were highlighted the previous year that addressed various legal concerns. For example, in 2013 and 2014, anticorruption training was provided to all global associates at the corporate director title and above. A legal and compliance training program was launched globally that focused on “communicating critical policies on anti-corruption, confidential information and trade secrets, and trade sanctions, among others. Each of the core compliance topics relates to laws created in various countries in order to protect society” 6 . Overall, HHW efforts to engage employees and inform stakeholders of the company’s legal compliance are commendable.

Understandably, there is little published information regarding legal issues in the HHW sponsored information. Evaluating the placement of information in the Corporate Responsibility Report, legal and business ethics topics are consistently combined in the same category throughout HHW website and literature. This makes sense because an unlawful act is usually unethical. Within the context of the report however, self-regulation and the corporate code of conduct sometimes reveal discrepancies. Jameson (2011) emphasizes “a consistent ethical stance is a goal companies must strive for if they are to persuade employees – and the public – that codes of business conduct and ethics are not mere window dressing” ( p. 296). An example of the discrepancy between corporate policy and actual behavior can be studied in the Starwood v. Hilton espionage scandal.

Ethical Responsibilities

Hospitality employees are susceptible to unethical situations and behaviors. As a result, hotel companies attempt to stay vigilant by incorporating an ethics-dimension to their company culture. A study conducted by Bonitto and Noriega (2012) explored whether individuals in service industry leadership positions thought unethical behavior existed among their peers. Overwhelmingly, respondents felt that unethical practices exist and reported concern that dishonorable behavior is on the rise. Respondents identified that the majority of unethical decisions stemmed from greed, moral perceptions, job protection and the desire to perform to organizational pressure (including to enhance personal income or retain position). Beyond instituting an ethics based corporate code of conduct, efforts to increase employee awareness of business ethics and CSR must be supplemented with on-the-job-training, education and tools for employees to use to help identify, vet and respond to ambiguous ethical situations. An ethical corporate culture will encourage an appreciation of ethics and promote the idea that one’s actions have an effect on peers, departments, individual hotels, and the company.

Like most large companies today, HHW has developed an internal code of conduct intended to provide ethical and moral guidance. The tenets of the code are imbedded in the Corporate Responsibility Report, supplemented by a 20-page document highlighting the importance of ethical behavior in the company’s CSR initiative. The code includes a standard of conduct for collective team members and addresses 25 ethics sub categories (see Table 1 ). The 2013–2014 Corporate Responsibility Report also provides 2013 employee engagement statistics. For example, the report notes that more than 45,000 employees completed the online Code of Conduct training module and employees at an additional 554 properties received offline training. Also stated in the report and Code of Conduct is the following statement regarding HHW commitment to ensure employees engage in annual training through a certification process (see Table 2 ).

Bohdansowicz and Zientara’s (2009) article focusing on social reporting in the hospitality industry found HHW and AccorHotels exceeded all other brands in relation to their CSR reporting. However, formulating a detailed written statement of ethics or code of conduct with specific documented policies does not provide fail-safe methods for preventing unethical behavior. Greenwashing, writing fake on-line travel reviews, truth in advertising and add-on pricing disclosures are just a few areas in which managers engage in ambiguous unethical behavior that may go undetected.

In 2009, however, unethical behavior at HHW was publically noticed. In a highly visible, dramatic and at times contentious lawsuit, Starwood Hotels and Resorts Worldwide charged HHW with industrial espionage and theft of trade secrets – specifically focused on research and development blueprints to create a new lifestyle brand similar to Starwood’s successful W Hotel Brand. The espionage came to light when Hilton hired two former senior executives from Starwood in 2008 who, prior to leaving the company, took over 100,000 electronic Starwood files containing confidential corporate information and company trade secrets. The stolen information saved HHW millions of dollars of research and thousands of hours of development time. Starwood’s suit claimed misappropriation of trade secrets, breach of contract on Starwood’s non-solicitation, confidentiality and intellectual property agreements, fraud, unfair competition, conversion, breach of fiduciary duty, unjust enrichment, and the violation of the computer fraud act among others (Clausing, 2010). In December 2010, Hilton settled the lawsuit for a reported $150 million and severe restrictions on Hilton’s future business, including a ban on introducing a new lifestyle brand for two years. “Although Hilton admitted no guilt, the massive settlement suggested the company feared it would lose more if it went to trial” (Jameson, 2009, p. 292).

Jameson (2009) points out that at the time of the lawsuit, Sheratons’ and HHW’s business ethic code, confidentiality agreements and code of conduct statements focused solely on its own self-interests and self-protection. This incident clearly identifies the need for hospitality companies to include statements that specifically speak to prohibiting giving information and using improperly obtained information about a competitor. Consequently, a review of HHW 2007 CSR and Annual Reports (2008, 2009 not available) reveals that a corporate code of ethics is not included in the document, however the 2013–2014 Corporate Social Responsibility Report includes a section dedicated to explicit instructions regarding the distribution of HHW proprietary documents as well as receiving such information from the competition (see Table 3 ). During this period, the lawsuit settlement, residual bad press and the economic downturn resulted in HHW revenue decline of 20 percent and a cash flow decrease of 30 percent. Blackstone, HHW ownership, was in danger of losing its investment of $5.6 billion (Cohan, 2014).

Evaluating HHW CSR focus on ethical responsibilities is best illustrated by examining the inclusion of business ethics in communication prior and post the 2009 Starwood lawsuit. Prior the scandal, HHW CSR reporting was viewed as superior to the competition however, CSR did not include a corporate code of ethics or provide significant attention to training and mandatory annual certification compared to what is required of HHW executives, managers and hourly employees today. In this respect, and perhaps because of the espionage case, HHW has made great strides in formalizing an inclusive CSR program. In fact, 2014 HHW was ranked the #2 Most Admired Company by Fortune Magazine in the Hotel, Casino and Resorts division 7 . This ranking alone is impressive however the industry especially took note of the accomplishment since HHW was not even in top 10 in 2013.

Global and Community Responsibilities

According to the 2014 United Nations World Tourism Organization (UNWTO) annual report, today’s global tourism is an economic force with a significant combined direct and indirect impact on the global economy (see Figure 2 ). HHW along with other global hospitality companies are investing in new destinations providing an important driver of economic progress through the creation of jobs and infrastructure development 8 . Hoteliers entering into new markets are challenged with achieving financial success while respecting the values and culture of the community and environment. In 2011, HHW introduced “Travel with a Purpose 9 ” (see Table 4 ) as their global corporate responsibility commitment that focuses on “creating shared value and provides a cohesive, yet flexible framework to guide the activities of (our) business across regions, brands and properties”. Informing stakeholders and committing resources to address growing global and community challenges heightens awareness however, the industry’s main challenge is preserving a consistent global approach and implementing good global human relations, sustainability/environmental programs, training-development programs and service related standards in a fractured industry with limited mandating control inherent in the franchise-management operating model.

For the past 25 years, the main CSR focus in the lodging industry has largely been on environmental concerns and the efficient use of energy. Research in 2007 by Holcomb, Upchurch & Okumus (2007) included a content analysis of hospitality company web sites, annual reports and (online) CSR reports to measure hotels’ CSR commitment. Of all the companies observed, “Hilton Corporation provided the most detailed information regarding their CSR activities” (p. 465). Their annual Corporate Responsibility Report and code of conduct outlined policies beyond environmental and conservationist activities to include efforts on equal opportunity and diversity, human rights, health, safety, as well as environment sustainability.

As part of their comprehensive CSR program HHW pioneered an environmental benchmarking tool called Hilton Environmental Reporting (HER). In 2010, HER was replaced by LightStay, a proprietary monitoring system developed to calculate and analyze environmental impact. In the first year of testing, results showed that the 1,300 Hilton Hotels using the system “conserved enough energy to power 5,700 homes for a year, saved enough water to fill more than 650 Olympic size pools and reduced carbon output equivalent to taking 34,865 cars off the road. Reductions in water and energy use also translated into dollars-saved for hotel owners, with estimated savings of more than $29 million in utility costs in 2009 10 “ To confirm the timely implementation and validity of the program, HHW hired KEMA-Registered Quality, Inc.—a Management Systems design company—to perform a series of third-party audits of LightStay.

When HHW publically introduced LightStay in an April 2010 press release, aggressive objectives and goals where put forth that mandated the use of Light stay in all HHW hotels by the end of 2011. Conservation and sustainability was to be a brand standard (like service) and when achieved, HHW would be the first major multi-brand company in the hospitality industry to require property-level measurement of sustainability. By the end of 2011, Hilton met this goal 11 .

HHW continues to broaden its sustainability strategy. In 2015 the CSR team introduced “Meet with Purpose 12 ,” a concept designed to assist meeting planners reduce waste and incorporate health and wellness into meetings and events. The concept focuses on two areas: Mindful Eating, which is designed to minimize food waste and encourage healthy choices; and Mindful Meeting, which outlines meeting practices that are less resource-intensive.

In addition to these efforts, HHW extends global and community CSR activities beyond environmental conservation and sustainability. The HHW CSR and Public Relations Department frequently communicates through their Travel with a Purpose campaign that highlights current CSR activities, through social media (encourage to Tweet) and press releases. Travel with a Purpose initiatives support a wide range of organizations, ranging from funding a filmmaking grant at the Sundance Film Festival (for eco-centric films), to efforts to support woman owned and minority suppliers, repurposed waste objectives, animal protection interventions and local efforts to support community food banks 13 . A sample list of 2013–2014 initiatives can be found in Table 4 .

Overall, HHW global and community responsibilities are commendable. However, prior to the roll out of its corporate code of conduct in 2010, HHW attracted negative press from reports concerning child trafficking and prostitution in several Hilton Hotels. Chinese police found a brothel operating in a Hilton Hotel in southern China and, earlier in the year, a similar incident was reported in Ireland. To make matters worse, activists sent thousands of letters in protest of HHW’s delay in addressing the issue and for not signing the End Child Prostitution, Child Pornography and the Trafficking of Children for Sexual Purposes 14 (ECPAT) code of conduct. HHW declined to join other hoteliers in their support of the ECPAT code because they felt their newly created corporate code of conduct would suffice (Bhandari, 2010). Although the intention was to illustrate HHW independent commitment to the stop sex trafficking, failing to sign the EPCAT code of conduct – uniting with other hoteliers – had proven to be a public relations oversight that caused negative publicity and tarnished Hilton’s public perception.

HHW CSR Assessment and Competitive Advantage

The hospitality industry has embraced CSR and most major hospitality companies are actively participating in socially responsible activities. In the past, lodging companies tended to communicate CSR as sustainable efforts, however major brands have moved toward a more balanced approach, incorporating philanthropy, community service, and special interest groups that extend beyond conservation and environmental sustainability. As pointed out by researchers (Bohdanowicz, 2007; DeGrosbois, 2012), HHW is as a leader in CSR reporting and transparency and deploys considerable resources to engage internal and external stakeholders its CSR efforts. These efforts have provoked changes in the company. For example, years after the 1998 sex trafficking allegations, HHW and Carlson Hotels Worldwide are today’s global hospitality leaders against sex trafficking – matching stakeholder donations, assisting activist efforts and building awareness. Similarly, after the alleged espionage scandal in 2009, HHW instituted unprecedented CSR transparency via the internet and shareholder engagement. In addition, to face the espionage scandal head on, HHW rolled out a corporate code of conduct and robust training and certification program centered on integrity, business ethics and global citizenship.

Gaining and sustaining competitive advantage has been recognized as the single most important goal of an organization (Porter, 1980) and is created through strategies that add value when the competition fails to do so. Over the past 25 years, CSR – and, in particular, “green” sustainability – has become a baseline requirement for all hotels. De Gosbois (2012) conducted data analysis research on CSR reporting in the hotel industry and found 109 out 150 of the largest hotel companies reported some information on CSR activities. The researchers further identified that of the 109 hotels communicating their actions, only half (54 hotels) discussed a commitment to specific goals. Even fewer hotels that actually list the actions directed at achieving the goal or report if the any of their CSR goals had been met.

One of the strengths that gives legitimacy and authenticity to HHW’s CSR efforts is its reporting strategies and third party independent audit/verification process. The lagging reporting efforts by competitors and the industry in general, however, poses challenges for stakeholders that are interested in a hotels CSR activities and commitment. It is difficult to tell if a company is reaching goals or if it is truly committed to CSR when outcomes are not measured, reported or verified. Companies that engage with third party audit (like HHW), given assurances that goals and performances are accurately reported. Due to the lack of verification, the general acceptance and universal commitment to CSR behaviors, the industry is susceptible to greenwashing. For example, often hotels portray towel reuse programs as environmental stewardship yet fail to make improvements in the area of greater environmental impact.

There are five different colored rectangular boxes inside which there are illustrations and text. A leftward arrow connects each box to the one next to it. There are different silhouettes above each box. Above the first box, there is a silhouette of a woman holding a trolley in her hand. In the box, the text says “9% GDP,” and below it is the illustration of a globe. On the box to its right, there is a silhouette of a man above the box, holding a briefcase in his hand. In the box, there are eleven pictograms representing men, out of which one man has his right hand raised with a briefcase in his left hand. The text in the box reads “1/11 JOBS.” In the third box next to this one, there is a silhouette of a man with a tripod stand with a camera on it. In the box, the text reads “US$ 1.5 TRILLION IN EXPORTS.” Below the text, there is an illustration of a stack of dollars. In the box next to this, there is again a silhouette of a woman pulling a trolley. In the box, the text reads “6% OF WORLD’S EXPORTS.” Below this, there is an illustration of an airplane. On the last box, next to this one, there is a silhouette of a man pulling a trolley. In the box, the text reads “30% OF SERVICES EXPORTS.” There is an illustration of a shopping cart below the text. Below the five boxes, there are two upward arrows and the text between the two arrows reads, “WHY TOURISM MATTERS.”

Figure 2: 2014 Global Impact of the Tourism Industry

An image of an animated chart, showing the global impact of the tourism industry.

In order to create competitive advantage, CSR actions should be valuable, rare, unique and non-substitutable. Given the universal acceptance of CSR in the hospitality industry and the lack of an industry-wide reporting structure, CSR engagement may not provide a competitive advantage for any hotel however, CSR outcomes may create competitive advantage opportunities indirectly. For example, CSR efforts have shown to result in cost reduction, brand legitimacy and positive reputation are influential in gaining competitive advantage 15 . CSR can also influence turnover 16 , increased the company’s attractiveness to employees 17 and improve guest experiences 18 .

Yah or Nay – Casting a Balanced Vote

The shareholders of Hilton Hotel Worldwide request the Board’s Compensation Committee to include corporate social action as one of the performance measures for senior executive’s compensation under the Company’s incentive plans. Corporate social action is defined as how environmental and social concerns are addressed, monitored and integrated into corporate strategy over the long term.

Your research revealed valuable information to guide you to your decision. How will you vote on the shareholder resolution?

Further Reading

Corporate social responsibility (introduction), corporate social responsibility theories.

1. This is a fictitious proxy vote used as an example for the case study.

2. From “Hilton Worldwide Holdings Inc. (NYSE:HLT) investor investigation concerning potential wrongdoing announced,” 2015, March 23, retrieved http://shareholdersfoundation.com/caseinvestigation/hilton-worldwide-holdings-inc-nysehlt-investor-investigation-concerning-potential-wronding-announced

3. From “Hilton’s Customer-information System, Called OnQ, Rolling out across 8 hotel brands,” Hotel Online, 2004, retrieved from http://www.hotel-online.com/News/PR2004_3rd/Aug04_OnQ.html

4. From “Hilton Hotels Corporation code of business conduct and ethics,” n.d., retrieved http://media.corporate-ir.net/media_files/irol/88/88577/corpgov/codeofethics_013004.pdf and “Corporate governance guidelines,” 2015, August 6, retrieved http://ir.hiltonworldwide.com/files/doc_downloads/GovernanceDocuments/2015/Corporate-Governance-Guidelines-2015.pdf

5. From “Hilton and Wyndham bulls are checking into the hoteliers,” by Yamamoto, M., 2015, April 14, retrieved http://www.thestreet.com/story/13106557/1/hilton-and-wyndham-bulls-are-checking-into-the-hoteliers.html

6. From “Travel with a purpose 2013–2014 corporate responsibility report: Corporate governance,” 2013, retrieved from http://cr.hiltonworldwide.com/approach/governance.php

7. Fortune Magazine The Most Admired list a report card on corporate reputations. The Hay Adams Group selects the 15 largest international industry and the 10 largest U.S. industry, surveying a total of 668 companies from 29 countries. To create the 55 industry lists, Hay asked executives, directors and analysts to rate companies in their own industry on nine criteria, from investment value to social responsibility. A company’s score must rank in the top half of its industry survey to be listed. From http://fortune.com/worlds-most-admired-companies/

8. From “UNWTO Tourism highlights 2015 edition,” 2014, retrieved from www.e-un-wto.org/doi/pdf/10.18111/9789284416899

9. From “Travel with a purpose, corporate responsibility report 2012–2013,” 2013, retrieved from http://cr.hiltonworldwide.com/2012/_pdf/Hilton_2012CRR_PDF_v22.0.pdf

10. From “Hilton Worldwide Unveils “LightStay” Sustainability Measurement System,” 2010, retrieved from http://news.hilton.com/index.cfm/news/hilton-worldwide-unveils-lightstay-sustainability-measurement-system?tl=it

11. From “Hilton Worldwide announces 2011 LightStay sustainability results,” 2012, retrieved from http://news.hiltonworldwide.com/index.cfm/news/hilton-worldwide-announces-2011-lightstay-sustainability-results

12. From “Hilton introduces ‘Meet with purpose’ to inspire sustainable, healthy choices for events,” 2015, retrieved from http://news.hiltonworldwide.com/index.cfm/news/hilton-introduces-meet-with-purpose-to-inspire-sustainable-healthy-choices-for-events

13. Retrieved from Hilton Worldwide News http://news.hiltonworldwide.com/

14. ECPAT International is a global network of organizations working together for the elimination of child prostitution, child pornography and the trafficking of children for sexual purposes. It seeks to ensure that children everywhere enjoy their fundamental rights free and secure from all forms of commercial sexual exploitation. Retrieved from http://www.ecpat.net/

15. From “The Business Case for Corporate Social Responsibility: A review of concepts, research and practice,” by Carroll, A., & Shabana, K., 2010, International Journal of Management Reviews, 12 (1), 85–105.

16. From “Corporate social responsibility and labor turnover,” by Vitaliano, D., 2010, Corporate Governance, 10(5), 563–573.

17. From “Toward a better understanding of the link between ethical climate and job satisfaction: A multilevel analysis,” Wang, Y. & Hsieh, H., 2012), Journal of Business Ethics, 105, 535–545.

18. From “Strategic corporate social responsibility management for competitive advantage,” by Filho, J.M., Wanderley, L.S., Gomez, C.P., & Farache, F., 2010, BAR – Brazilian Administration Review, 7(3), 394–309.

This case was prepared for inclusion in Sage Business Cases primarily as a basis for classroom discussion or self-study, and is not meant to illustrate either effective or ineffective management styles. Nothing herein shall be deemed to be an endorsement of any kind. This case is for scholarly, educational, or personal use only within your university, and cannot be forwarded outside the university or used for other commercial purposes.

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The marketplace for case solutions.

Hilton HHonors Worldwide: Loyalty Wars – Case Solution

Hilton Hotels regards the frequent guest program as the industry's most significant advertising tool, focusing marketing efforts at the heavy user. What can Hilton do, whenever a competitor ups the ante? This case study demonstrates the financial aspects of frequency marketing in industries having a very distinct "heavy half" to their user base and allows students to discuss how to proceed when Sheraton and Westin apparently overdo a positive thing.

​John Deighton, Stowe Shoemaker Harvard Business School ( 501010-PDF-ENG ) Oct 12, 2000 (Revision: Nov 8, 2005)

Case questions answered:

  • What are the strengths and weaknesses of the Hilton HHonors program? Consider this question from the perspective of each of the various entities involved (Hilton, HHonors’ member properties, guests, and any others).
  • Hotel consumers buy a “branded” experience (Hilton, Hyatt, etc.). However, the experience is delivered away from corporate scrutiny and under various degrees of control – a local manager, a franchisee, or a property operator. How can a loyalty program help the property operator and brand owner manage customers better?
  • Franchisees have options. Looking at the Hhonors program from the perspective of the franchisee, how would you assess the value of having the Hilton brand on your property as opposed to having one of the Starwood brands..?
  • Quantify the value of the Hhonors program to Hilton. How does the value generated by the program compare to the program’s cost?
  • How should Hilton respond to Starwood?

Not the questions you were looking for? Submit your own questions & get answers .

Hilton HHonors Worldwide: Loyalty Wars Case Answers

What are the strengths and weaknesses of the hilton hhonors program.

Consider this question from the perspective of each of the various entities involved (Hilton HHonors’ member properties, guests, and any others).

A key element to represent in which way a company exists and competes with others and has either an auspicious or inauspicious future in the world market is to analyze the company’s strengths and weaknesses deeply.

By examining, in this particular case, the strengths and weaknesses of the Hilton HHonors program created by the Hilton brand, it would be easy to fully understand if this program brings success or not to this corporation and what could any future changes or recommendations be, to satisfy more the world market’s demand.

To begin with, the strengths of this HHonors program will be analyzed further down. First of all, a significant advantage that this program provides to the customers is that it is open to anyone with no charge at all. This gives the opportunity to anyone who would like to join this “Hilton residence” to be welcomed and start his collection of points.

Secondly, a major factor is that Hilton’s brand, with its HHonors program, gives the unique hotel chains the opportunity of the so-called “Double Dipping.” Double Dipping offers a combination of the earned points either from the hotel program or from other affiliated companies without having to choose between points, for example, availing them in the hotel program or miles in an affiliated airline.

This is a very positive issue for customers because they can earn the “desirable” points from many activities, such as car rental companies, airlines, or partners like FTD Florist, Mrs. Field’s Cookies, etc.

In particular, the Hilton HHonors program has partnered with twenty-five airlines around the world, three car rental companies, and a large number of other companies, where people can earn miles and spend them as they wish. Moreover, members can enjoy free stays by using their points, and they also enjoy priorities, for instance, priority-reservation telephone numbers, faster check-in, late checkout, and other services provided.

For instance, the silver members can be upgraded to the best room in the hotel after the fifth stay, and the gold VIP member can be upgraded to the best room after every fifth stay, which can occur even at the time of check-in. What can also be described as the strength of this program is that the Hilton brand tries to come closer to its clients.

With the use of questionnaires, personal interviews with the members, and a database that gives specific information about customer’s preferences and needs, this program attempts to meet everyone’s expectations and make its clients feel that the organization cares about them because they strongly believe that “people care about organizations that care about them.” They try to treat their members in the best possible way so that the clients feel like they deserve that special treatment.

The strengths mentioned above seem to result in having satisfied customers and a fully informed database for future development. However, there is always space for improvement in every sector. Some of the weaknesses of this program are referred to below.

Primarily, most of those reward programs, as well as the HHonors program, have some restrictive conditions, e.g., their members cannot claim benefits such as free stay at high season demand or when local events guarantee 100% hotel occupancy. Also, there are limitations in the number of rooms available for free stays.

Moreover, customers must previously exchange points for a certificate and then use them to pay for an authorized stay. This bureaucracy often brings…

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Hilton Hotels

  • Harvard Case Studies

Harvard Business Case Studies Solutions – Assignment Help

In most courses studied at Harvard Business schools, students are provided with a case study. Major HBR cases concerns on a whole industry, a whole organization or some part of organization; profitable or non-profitable organizations. Student’s role is to analyze the case and diagnose the situation, identify the problem and then give appropriate recommendations and steps to be taken.

To make a detailed case analysis, student should follow these steps:

STEP 1: Reading Up Harvard Case Study Method Guide:

Case study method guide is provided to students which determine the aspects of problem needed to be considered while analyzing a case study. It is very important to have a thorough reading and understanding of guidelines provided. However, poor guide reading will lead to misunderstanding of case and failure of analyses. It is recommended to read guidelines before and after reading the case to understand what is asked and how the questions are to be answered. Therefore, in-depth understanding f case guidelines is very important.

Harvard Case Study Solutions

porter's five forces model

porter’s five forces model

STEP 2: Reading The Hilton Hotels Harvard Case Study:

To have a complete understanding of the case, one should focus on case reading. It is said that case should be read two times. Initially, fast reading without taking notes and underlines should be done. Initial reading is to get a rough idea of what information is provided for the analyses. Then, a very careful reading should be done at second time reading of the case. This time, highlighting the important point and mark the necessary information provided in the case. In addition, the quantitative data in case, and its relations with other quantitative or qualitative variables should be given more importance. Also, manipulating different data and combining with other information available will give a new insight. However, all of the information provided is not reliable and relevant.

When having a fast reading, following points should be noted:

  • Nature of organization
  • Nature if industry in which organization operates.
  • External environment that is effecting organization
  • Problems being faced by management
  • Identification of communication strategies.
  • Any relevant strategy that can be added.
  • Control and out-of-control situations.

When reading the case for second time, following points should be considered:

  • Decisions needed to be made and the responsible Person to make decision.
  • Objectives of the organization and key players in this case.
  • The compatibility of objectives. if not, their reconciliations and necessary redefinition.
  • Sources and constraints of organization from meeting its objectives.

After reading the case and guidelines thoroughly, reader should go forward and start the analyses of the case.

STEP 3: Doing The Case Analysis Of Hilton Hotels:

To make an appropriate case analyses, firstly, reader should mark the important problems that are happening in the organization. There may be multiple problems that can be faced by any organization. Secondly, after identifying problems in the company, identify the most concerned and important problem that needed to be focused.

Firstly, the introduction is written. After having a clear idea of what is defined in the case, we deliver it to the reader. It is better to start the introduction from any historical or social context. The challenging diagnosis for Hilton Hotels and the management of information is needed to be provided. However, introduction should not be longer than 6-7 lines in a paragraph. As the most important objective is to convey the most important message for to the reader.

After introduction, problem statement is defined. In the problem statement, the company’s most important problem and constraints to solve these problems should be define clearly. However, the problem should be concisely define in no more than a paragraph. After defining the problems and constraints, analysis of the case study is begin.

STEP 4: SWOT Analysis of the Hilton Hotels HBR Case Solution:

SWOT analysis helps the business to identify its strengths and weaknesses, as well as understanding of opportunity that can be availed and the threat that the company is facing. SWOT for Hilton Hotels is a powerful tool of analysis as it provide a thought to uncover and exploit the opportunities that can be used to increase and enhance company’s operations. In addition, it also identifies the weaknesses of the organization that will help to be eliminated and manage the threats that would catch the attention of the management.

This strategy helps the company to make any strategy that would differentiate the company from competitors, so that the organization can compete successfully in the industry. The strengths and weaknesses are obtained from internal organization. Whereas, the opportunities and threats are generally related from external environment of organization. Moreover, it is also called Internal-External Analysis.

In the strengths, management should identify the following points exists in the organization:

  • Advantages of the organization
  • Activities of the company better than competitors.
  • Unique resources and low cost resources company have.
  • Activities and resources market sees as the company’s strength.
  • Unique selling proposition of the company.

WEAKNESSES:

  • Improvement that could be done.
  • Activities that can be avoided for Hilton Hotels.
  • Activities that can be determined as your weakness in the market.
  • Factors that can reduce the sales.
  • Competitor’s activities that can be seen as your weakness.

OPPORTUNITIES:

  • Good opportunities that can be spotted.
  • Interesting trends of industry.
  • Change in technology and market strategies
  • Government policy changes that is related to the company’s field
  • Changes in social patterns and lifestyles.
  • Local events.

Following points can be identified as a threat to company:

  • Company’s facing obstacles.
  • Activities of competitors.
  • Product and services quality standards
  • Threat from changing technologies
  • Financial/cash flow problems
  • Weakness that threaten the business.

Following points should be considered when applying SWOT to the analysis:

  • Precise and verifiable phrases should be sued.
  • Prioritize the points under each head, so that management can identify which step has to be taken first.
  • Apply the analyses at proposed level. Clear yourself first that on what basis you have to apply SWOT matrix.
  • Make sure that points identified should carry itself with strategy formulation process.
  • Use particular terms (like USP, Core Competencies Analyses etc.) to get a comprehensive picture of analyses.

Pest analysis

  • Pest analysis

STEP 5: PESTEL/ PEST Analysis of Hilton Hotels Case Solution:

Pest analyses is a widely used tool to analyze the Political, Economic, Socio-cultural, Technological, Environmental and legal situations which can provide great and new opportunities to the company as well as these factors can also threat the company, to be dangerous in future.

Pest analysis is very important and informative.  It is used for the purpose of identifying business opportunities and advance threat warning. Moreover, it also helps to the extent to which change is useful for the company and also guide the direction for the change. In addition, it also helps to avoid activities and actions that will be harmful for the company in future, including projects and strategies.

To analyze the business objective and its opportunities and threats, following steps should be followed:

  • Brainstorm and assumption the changes that should be made to organization. Answer the necessary questions that are related to specific needs of organization
  • Analyze the opportunities that would be happen due to the change.
  • Analyze the threats and issues that would be caused due to change.
  • Perform cost benefit analyses and take the appropriate action.

PEST FACTORS:

  • Next political elections and changes that will happen in the country due to these elections
  • Strong and powerful political person, his point of view on business policies and their effect on the organization.
  • Strength of property rights and law rules. And its ratio with corruption and organized crimes. Changes in these situation and its effects.
  • Change in Legislation and taxation effects on the company
  • Trend of regulations and deregulations. Effects of change in business regulations
  • Timescale of legislative change.
  • Other political factors likely to change for Hilton Hotels.

ECONOMICAL:

  • Position and current economy trend i.e. growing, stagnant or declining.
  • Exchange rates fluctuations and its relation with company.
  • Change in Level of customer’s disposable income and its effect.
  • Fluctuation in unemployment rate and its effect on hiring of skilled employees
  • Access to credit and loans. And its effects on company
  • Effect of globalization on economic environment
  • Considerations on other economic factors

SOCIO-CULTURAL:

  • Change in population growth rate and age factors, and its impacts on organization.
  • Effect on organization due to Change in attitudes and generational shifts.
  • Standards of health, education and social mobility levels. Its changes and effects on company.
  • Employment patterns, job market trend and attitude towards work according to different age groups.

case study solutions

  • Social attitudes and social trends, change in socio culture an dits effects.
  • Religious believers and life styles and its effects on organization
  • Other socio culture factors and its impacts.

TECHNOLOGICAL:

  • Any new technology that company is using
  • Any new technology in market that could affect the work, organization or industry
  • Access of competitors to the new technologies and its impact on their product development/better services.
  • Research areas of government and education institutes in which the company can make any efforts
  • Changes in infra-structure and its effects on work flow
  • Existing technology that can facilitate the company
  • Other technological factors and their impacts on company and industry

These headings and analyses would help the company to consider these factors and make a “big picture” of company’s characteristics. This will help the manager to take the decision and drawing conclusion about the forces that would create a big impact on company and its resources.

STEP 6: Porter’s Five Forces/ Strategic Analysis Of The Hilton Hotels Case Study:

rp_hbr-case-study-solutions-analyses-300x232.png

To analyze the structure of a company and its corporate strategy, Porter’s five forces model is used. In this model, five forces have been identified which play an important part in shaping the market and industry. These forces are used to measure competition intensity and profitability of an industry and market.

porter’s five forces model

These forces refers to micro environment and the company ability to serve its customers and make a profit. These five forces includes three forces from horizontal competition and two forces from vertical competition. The five forces are discussed below:

  • THREAT OF NEW ENTRANTS:
  • as the industry have high profits, many new entrants will try to enter into the market. However, the new entrants will eventually cause decrease in overall industry profits. Therefore, it is necessary to block the new entrants in the industry. following factors is describing the level of threat to new entrants:
  • Barriers to entry that includes copy rights and patents.
  • High capital requirement
  • Government restricted policies
  • Switching cost
  • Access to suppliers and distributions
  • Customer loyalty to established brands.
  • THREAT OF SUBSTITUTES:
  • this describes the threat to company. If the goods and services are not up to the standard, consumers can use substitutes and alternatives that do not need any extra effort and do not make a major difference. For example, using Aquafina in substitution of tap water, Pepsi in alternative of Coca Cola. The potential factors that made customer shift to substitutes are as follows:
  • Price performance of substitute
  • Switching costs of buyer
  • Products substitute available in the market
  • Reduction of quality
  • Close substitution are available
  • DEGREE OF INDUSTRY RIVALRY:
  • the lesser money and resources are required to enter into any industry, the higher there will be new competitors and be an effective competitor. It will also weaken the company’s position. Following are the potential factors that will influence the company’s competition:
  • Competitive advantage
  • Continuous innovation
  • Sustainable position in competitive advantage
  • Level of advertising
  • Competitive strategy
  • BARGAINING POWER OF BUYERS:
  • it deals with the ability of customers to take down the prices. It mainly consists the importance of a customer and the level of cost if a customer will switch from one product to another. The buyer power is high if there are too many alternatives available. And the buyer power is low if there are lesser options of alternatives and switching. Following factors will influence the buying power of customers:
  • Bargaining leverage
  • Switching cost of a buyer
  • Buyer price sensitivity
  • Competitive advantage of company’s product
  • BARGAINING POWER OF SUPPLIERS:
  • this refers to the supplier’s ability of increasing and decreasing prices. If there are few alternatives o supplier available, this will threat the company and it would have to purchase its raw material in supplier’s terms. However, if there are many suppliers alternative, suppliers have low bargaining power and company do not have to face high switching cost. The potential factors that effects bargaining power of suppliers are the following:
  • Input differentiation
  • Impact of cost on differentiation
  • Strength of distribution centers
  • Input substitute’s availability.

STEP 7: VRIO Analysis of Hilton Hotels:

Vrio analysis for Hilton Hotels case study identified the four main attributes which helps the organization to gain a competitive advantages. The author of this theory suggests that firm must be valuable, rare, imperfectly imitable and perfectly non sustainable. Therefore there must be some resources and capabilities in an organization that can facilitate the competitive advantage to company. The four components of VRIO analysis are described below: VALUABLE: the company must have some resources or strategies that can exploit opportunities and defend the company from major threats. If the company holds some value then answer is yes. Resources are also valuable if they provide customer satisfaction and increase customer value. This value may create by increasing differentiation in existing product or decrease its price. Is these conditions are not met, company may lead to competitive disadvantage. Therefore, it is necessary to continually review the Hilton Hotels company’s activities and resources values. RARE: the resources of the Hilton Hotels company that are not used by any other company are known as rare. Rare and valuable resources grant much competitive advantages to the firm. However, when more than one few companies uses the same resources and provide competitive parity are also known as rare resources. Even, the competitive parity is not desired position, but the company should not lose its valuable resources, even they are common. COSTLY TO IMITATE: the resources are costly to imitate, if other organizations cannot imitate it. However, imitation is done in two ways. One is duplicating that is direct imitation and the other one is substituting that is indirect imitation. Any firm who has valuable and rare resources, and these resources are costly to imitate, have achieved their competitive advantage. However, resources should also be perfectly non sustainable. The reasons that resource imitation is costly are historical conditions, casual ambiguity and social complexity. ORGANIZED TO CAPTURE VALUE: resources, itself, cannot provide advantages to organization until it is organized and exploit to do so. A firm (like Hilton Hotels)  must organize its management systems, processes, policies and strategies to fully utilize the resource’s potential to be valuable, rare and costly to imitate.

case study solutions

STEP 8: Generating Alternatives For Hilton Hotels Case Solution:

After completing the analyses of the company, its opportunities and threats, it is important to generate a solution of the problem and the alternatives a company can apply in order to solve its problems. To generate the alternative of problem, following things must to be kept in mind:

  • Realistic solution should be identified that can be operated in the company, with all its constraints and opportunities.
  • as the problem and its solution cannot occur at the same time, it should be described as mutually exclusive
  • it is not possible for a company to not to take any action, therefore, the alternative of doing nothing is not viable.
  • Student should provide more than one decent solution. Providing two undesirable alternatives to make the other one attractive is not acceptable.

Once the alternatives have been generated, student should evaluate the options and select the appropriate and viable solution for the company.

STEP 9: Selection Of Alternatives For Hilton Hotels Case Solution:

It is very important to select the alternatives and then evaluate the best one as the company have limited choices and constraints. Therefore to select the best alternative, there are many factors that is needed to be kept in mind. The criteria’s on which business decisions are to be selected areas under:

  • Improve profitability
  • Increase sales, market shares, return on investments
  • Customer satisfaction
  • Brand image
  • Corporate mission, vision and strategy
  • Resources and capabilities

Alternatives should be measures that which alternative will perform better than other one and the valid reasons. In addition, alternatives should be related to the problem statements and issues described in the case study.

STEP 10: Evaluation Of Alternatives For Hilton Hotels Case Solution:

If the selected alternative is fulfilling the above criteria, the decision should be taken straightforwardly. Best alternative should be selected must be the best when evaluating it on the decision criteria. Another method used to evaluate the alternatives are the list of pros and cons of each alternative and one who has more pros than cons and can be workable under organizational constraints.

STEP 11: Recommendations For Hilton Hotels Case Study (Solution):

There should be only one recommendation to enhance the company’s operations and its growth or solving its problems. The decision that is being taken should be justified and viable for solving the problems.

caseism

Hilton Hotel Case Solution & Answer

Home » Case Study Analysis Solutions » Hilton Hotel

Problem Statement

Hilton Hotel has been the leader in the lodging industry market due to the proper use of making strategies in maintaining CRM. One of the Investment Company Blackstone plans to invest and takeover in Hilton Hotel which provides an opportunity to enhance its CRM. Hilton faces certain decision problems whether the company should reinvest in the existing market, integrated CRM platform or invest in new and more targeted CRM capabilities, for remaining a leader in the lodging market.

Analysis of the Case

For making the effective decision on using Blackstone’s investment in CRM, it is important first to analyze the Hilton’s current performance by using SWOT such as its strength, weakness, opportunities and Threats and the porter 5 forces which are the Bargaining power of supplier, buyers, threats of new entrants, substitutes and competition.

Hilton Hotels have become the leader and highly recognised in the lodging industry. The reason for acquiring such position is because of the proper use of its strategy by capturing the market through setting up many hotels. The other reasons are that it had many diversified brands in which it positioned effectivelywhich Waldorf=Astoria Collection, Conrad International, Hilton Hotels & International, Embassy Suites and among others. The biggest factor that has helped Hilton gaining the position is because of the technology innovations and constant upgrades on its CRM software Hilton OnQ on providing and taking excellent care of its customers.

Strength of the hotel is that it has dominated the U.S lodging market and as well theopening of new hotels in 540 hotels in 78 countries either by franchising and aligning in the international market. The other factors which are considered its strength are the strong friendly work culture, proper training given to employees on how to handle the customers and also acquiring a good reputation among the market.

The weakness of the company lies in some of the areas which have made it lose some advantages in the market and among its competitors. The weakness is that by setting up hotels in so many different countries has caused them difficulty in maintaining and handle its business. Such as countries having adifferent culture and government policies has caused to affect Hilton’s operations. This makes it difficult to run its operation and services in doing business globally.

Another factor which has affected Hilton greatly is that Hilton’s entire focus was setting hotels in the United States. Hilton was late in expanding its business in the global market which made it difficult to break into the global market segments. This causes them having less knowledge and information about the other countries culture and policies and were faced certain challenges when competing with the local competitors.

Opportunities

The opportunities of the hotel are that being a top and recognised hotel globally has gained them ample amount of opportunities. Some of the opportunities are that there are many investors who are willing to invest in the company such as Blackstone who is willing to invest a lot of money. Another opportunity the company has is that it can expand its business by setting up hotels in different Middle East countries. The countries areshowing improvement in their economic conditions, developed countries having middle and upper-class people and also countries experiencing with high tourism due to their beauty and nature. Such countries are Pakistan, India, and Russia and among few others which Hilton has anopportunity in setting up its hotels…………………..

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Hilton Hotels: Brand Differentiation through Customer Relationship Management

By: Lynda M. Applegate, Gabriele Piccoli, Chekitan S. Dev

This case analyzes the Hilton Hotels Corporation's CRM strategy at a key juncture in its history, immediately after the firm has been taken private by Blackstone. The case provides students with a…

  • Length: 18 page(s)
  • Publication Date: Jul 23, 2008
  • Discipline: Strategy
  • Product #: 809029-PDF-ENG

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This case analyzes the Hilton Hotels Corporation's CRM strategy at a key juncture in its history, immediately after the firm has been taken private by Blackstone. The case provides students with a comprehensive history of the evolution and IT enablers of Hilton's CRM Initiative, as well as the proprietary OnQ enterprise system. The case thus offers a rare opportunity to engage in a longitudinal evaluation of the firm's CRM initiative, and to enable students to propose the future evolution of the initiative based on their analysis.

Jul 23, 2008

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hilton case study solution

Hilton Hotels Brand Differentiation Through Customer Relationship Management Case Study Solution Analysis

Hilton Hotels Brand Differentiation Through Customer Relationship Management Case Study Solution Analysis

by HBR Forty Three

Hilton Hotels Brand Differentiation Through Customer Relationship Management Case Study Solution Analysis. Get Hilton Hotels Brand Differentiation Through Customer Relationship Management Case Study Analysis Solution. Contact us directly at... More

Hilton Hotels Brand Differentiation Through Customer Relationship Management Case Study Solution Analysis. Get Hilton Hotels Brand Differentiation Through Customer Relationship Management Case Study Analysis Solution. Contact us directly at buycasesolutions(at)gmail(dot)com if you want to order for Hilton Hotels Brand Differentiation Through Customer Relationship Management Case Solution, Case Analysis, Case Study Solution. Lynda M. Applegate, Gabriele Piccoli, Chekitan S. Dev Less

Email us for Any Case Solution at: [email protected] Hilton Hotels Brand Differentiation through Customer Relationship Management Case Study Solution Analysis Hilton Hotels Brand Differentiation through Customer Relationship Management Case Study Solution Analysis. Our tutors are available 24/7 to assist in your academic stuff, Our Professional writers are ready to serve you in services you need. Every Case Study Solution & Analysis is prepared from scratch, top quality, plagiarism free. Authors: Lynda M. Applegate, Gabriele Piccoli, Chekitan S. Dev Get Case Study Solution and Analysis of Hilton Hotels Brand Differentiation through Customer Relationship Management in a FAIR PRICE!! Steps for Case Study Solution Analysis: 1. Introduction of Hilton Hotels Brand Differentiation through Customer Relationship Management Case Solution The Hilton Hotels Brand Differentiation through Customer Relationship Management case study is a Harvard Business Review case study, which presents a simulated practical experience to the reader allowing them to learn about real life problems in the business world. The Hilton Hotels Brand Differentiation through Customer Relationship Management case consisted of a central issue to the organization, which had to be identified, analysed and creative solutions had to be drawn to tackle the issue. This paper presents the solved Hilton Hotels Brand Differentiation through Customer Relationship Management case analysis and case solution. The method through which the analysis is done is mentioned, followed by the relevant tools used in finding the solution. The case solution first identifies the central issue to the Hilton Hotels Brand Differentiation through Customer Relationship Management case study, and the Email us for Any Case Solution at: [email protected] Note: This article is just a sample and not an actual case solution. If you want original case solution, please place your order on the Email. Please do check Junk/Spam folder of your E-mail for our reply, if not in Inbox.

Email us for Any Case Solution at: [email protected] relevant stakeholders affected by this issue. This is known as the problem identification stage. After this, the relevant tools and models are used, which help in the case study analysis and case study solution. The tools used in identifying the solution consist of the SWOT Analysis, Porter Five Forces Analysis, PESTEL Analysis, VRIO analysis, Value Chain Analysis, BCG Matrix analysis, Ansoff Matrix analysis, and the Marketing Mix analysis. The solution consists of recommended strategies to overcome this central issue. It is a good idea to also propose alternative case study solutions, because if the main solution is not found feasible, then the alternative solutions could be implemented. Lastly, a good case study solution also includes an implementation plan for the recommendation strategies. This shows how through a step-by-step procedure as to how the central issue can be resolved. 2. Problem Identification of Hilton Hotels Brand Differentiation through Customer Relationship Management Case Solution Harvard Business Review cases involve a central problem that is being faced by the organization and these problems affect a number of stakeholders. In the problem identification stage, the problem faced by Hilton Hotels Brand Differentiation through Customer Relationship Management is identified through reading of the case. This could be mentioned at the start of the reading, the middle or the end. At times in a case analysis, the problem may be clearly evident in the reading of the HBR case. At other times, finding the issue is the job of the person analysing the case. It is also important to understand what stakeholders are affected by the problem and how. The goals of the stakeholders and are the organization are also identified to ensure that the case study analysis are consistent with these. 3. Analysis of the Hilton Hotels Brand Differentiation through Customer Relationship Management HBR Case Study The objective of the case should be focused on. This is doing the Hilton Hotels Brand Differentiation through Customer Relationship Management Case Solution. This analysis can be proceeded in a step-by-step procedure to ensure that effective solutions are found. In the first step, a growth path of the company can be formulated that lays down its vision, mission and strategic aims. These can usually be developed using the company history is provided in the case. Company history is helpful in a Business Case study as it helps one understand what the scope of the solutions will be for the case study. Email us for Any Case Solution at: [email protected] Note: This article is just a sample and not an actual case solution. If you want original case solution, please place your order on the Email. Please do check Junk/Spam folder of your E-mail for our reply, if not in Inbox.

Email us for Any Case Solution at: [email protected] The next step is of understanding the company; its people, their priorities and the overall culture. This can be done by using company history. It can also be done by looking at anecdotal instances of managers or employees that are usually included in an HBR case study description to give the reader a real feel of the situation. Lastly, a timeline of the issues and events in the case needs to be made. Arranging events in a timeline allows one to predict the next few events that are likely to take place. It also helps one in developing the case study solutions. The timeline also helps in understanding the continuous challenges that are being faced by the organisation. 4. SWOT analysis of Hilton Hotels Brand Differentiation through Customer Relationship Management An important tool that helps in addressing the central issue of the case and coming up with Hilton Hotels Brand Differentiation through Customer Relationship Management HBR case solution is the SWOT analysis. The SWOT analysis is a strategic management tool that lists down in the form of a matrix, an organisation's internal strengths and weaknesses, and external opportunities and threats. It helps in the strategic analysis of Hilton Hotels Brand Differentiation through Customer Relationship Management Once this listing has been done, a clearer picture can be developed in regards to how strategies will be formed to address the main problem. For example, strengths will be used as an advantage in solving the issue. Therefore, the SWOT analysis is a helpful tool in coming up with the Hilton Hotels Brand Differentiation through Customer Relationship Management Case Study answers. One does not need to remain restricted to using the traditional SWOT analysis, but the advanced TOWS matrix or weighted average SWOT analysis can also be used. 5. Porter Five Forces Analysis for Hilton Hotels Brand Differentiation through Customer Relationship Management Another helpful tool in finding the case solutions is of Porter's Five Forces analysis. This is also a strategic tool that is used to analyse the competitive environment of the industry in which Hilton Hotels Brand Differentiation through Customer Relationship Management operates in. Analysis of the industry is important as businesses do not work in isolation in real life, but are affected by the business environment of the industry that they operate in. Harvard Business case studies Email us for Any Case Solution at: [email protected] Note: This article is just a sample and not an actual case solution. If you want original case solution, please place your order on the Email. Please do check Junk/Spam folder of your E-mail for our reply, if not in Inbox.

Email us for Any Case Solution at: [email protected] represent real-life situations, and therefore, an analysis of the industry's competitive environment needs to be carried out to come up with more holistic case study solutions. In Porter's Five Forces analysis, the industry is analysed along 5 dimensions. • These are the threats that the industry faces due to new entrants. • It includes the threat of substitute products. • It includes the bargaining power of buyers in the industry. • It includes the bargaining power of suppliers in an industry. • Lastly, the overall rivalry or competition within the industry is analysed This tool helps one understand the relative powers of the major players in the industry and its overall competitive dynamics. Actionable and practical solutions can then be developed by keeping these factors into perspective. 6. PESTEL Analysis of Hilton Hotels Brand Differentiation through Customer Relationship Management Another helpful tool that should be used in finding the case study solutions is the PESTEL analysis. This also looks at the external business environment of the organisation helps in finding case study Analysis to real-life business issues as in HBR cases. • The PESTEL analysis particularly looks at the macro environmental factors that affect the industry. These are the political, environmental, social, technological, environmental and legal (regulatory) factors affecting the industry. • Factors within each of these 6 should be listed down, and analysis should be made as to how these affect the organisation under question. 7. VRIO Analysis of Hilton Hotels Brand Differentiation through Customer Relationship Management This is an analysis carried out to know about the internal strengths and capabilities of Hilton Hotels Brand Differentiation through Customer Relationship Management . Under the VRIO analysis, the following steps are carried out: • The internal resources of Hilton Hotels Brand Differentiation through Customer Relationship Management are listed down. • Each of these resources are assessed in terms of the value it brings to the organization. Email us for Any Case Solution at: [email protected] Note: This article is just a sample and not an actual case solution. If you want original case solution, please place your order on the Email. Please do check Junk/Spam folder of your E-mail for our reply, if not in Inbox.

Email us for Any Case Solution at: [email protected] • Each resource is assessed in terms of how rare it is. A rare resource is one that is not commonly used by competitors. • Each resource is assessed whether it could be imitated by competition easily or not. • Lastly, each resource is assessed in terms of whether the organization can use it to an advantage or not. • The analysis done on the 4 dimensions; Value, Rareness, Imitability, and Organization. If a resource is high on all of these 4, then it brings long-term competitive advantage. If a resource is high on Value, Rareness, and Imitability, then it brings an unused competitive advantage. If a resource is high on Value and Rareness, then it only brings temporary competitive advantage. If a resource is only valuable, then it’s a competitive parity. If it’s none, then it can be regarded as a competitive disadvantage. 8. Value Chain Analysis of Hilton Hotels Brand Differentiation through Customer Relationship Management The Value chain analysis of Hilton Hotels Brand Differentiation through Customer Relationship Management helps in identifying the activities of an organization, and how these add value in terms of cost reduction and differentiation. This tool is used in the case study analysis as follows: • The firm’s primary and support activities are listed down. • Identifying the importance of these activities in the cost of the product and the differentiation they produce. • Lastly, differentiation or cost reduction strategies are to be used for each of these activities to increase the overall value provided by these activities. Recognizing value creating activities and enhancing the value that they create allow Hilton Hotels Brand Differentiation through Customer Relationship Management to increase its competitive advantage. 9. BCG Matrix of Hilton Hotels Brand Differentiation through Customer Relationship Management The BCG Matrix is an important tool in deciding whether an organization should invest or divest in its strategic business units. The matrix involves placing the strategic business units of a business in one of four categories; question marks, stars, dogs and cash cows. The placement in these categories depends on the relative market share of the organization and the market growth of these strategic business units. The steps to be followed in this analysis is as follows: Email us for Any Case Solution at: [email protected] Note: This article is just a sample and not an actual case solution. If you want original case solution, please place your order on the Email. Please do check Junk/Spam folder of your E-mail for our reply, if not in Inbox.

Email us for Any Case Solution at: [email protected] • Identify the relative market share of each strategic business unit. • Identify the market growth of each strategic business unit. • Place these strategic business units in one of four categories. Question Marks are those strategic business units with high market share and low market growth rate. Stars are those strategic business units with high market share and high market growth rate. Cash Cows are those strategic business units with high market share and low market growth rate. Dogs are those strategic business units with low market share and low growth rate. • Relevant strategies should be implemented for each strategic business unit depending on its position in the matrix. The strategies identified from the Hilton Hotels Brand Differentiation through Customer Relationship Management BCG matrix and included in the case pdf. These are either to further develop the product, penetrate the market, develop the market, diversification, investing or divesting. 10. Ansoff Matrix of Hilton Hotels Brand Differentiation through Customer Relationship Management Ansoff Matrix is an important strategic tool to come up with future strategies for Hilton Hotels Brand Differentiation through Customer Relationship Management in the case solution. It helps decide whether an organization should pursue future expansion in new markets and products or should it focus on existing markets and products. • The organization can penetrate into existing markets with its existing products. This is known as market penetration strategy. • The organization can develop new products for the existing market. This is known as product development strategy. • The organization can enter new markets with its existing products. This is known as market development strategy. • The organization can enter into new markets with new products. This is known as a diversification strategy. The choice of strategy depends on the analysis of the previous tools used and the level of risk the organization is willing to take. 11. Marketing Mix of Hilton Hotels Brand Differentiation through Customer Relationship Management Email us for Any Case Solution at: [email protected] Note: This article is just a sample and not an actual case solution. If you want original case solution, please place your order on the Email. Please do check Junk/Spam folder of your E-mail for our reply, if not in Inbox.

Email us for Any Case Solution at: [email protected] Hilton Hotels Brand Differentiation through Customer Relationship Management needs to bring out certain responses from the market that it targets. To do so, it will need to use the marketing mix, which serves as a tool in helping bring out responses from the market. The 4 elements of the marketing mix are Product, Price, Place and Promotions. The following steps are required to carry out a marketing mix analysis and include this in the case study analysis. • Analyse the company’s products and devise strategies to improve the product offering of the company. • Analyse the company’s price points and devise strategies that could be based on competition, value or cost. • Analyse the company’s promotion mix. This includes the advertisement, public relations, personal selling, sales promotion, and direct marketing. Strategies will be devised which makes use of a few or all of these elements. • Analyse the company’s distribution and reach. Strategies can be devised to improve the availability of the company’s products. 12. Hilton Hotels Brand Differentiation through Customer Relationship Management Strategy The strategies devised and included in the Hilton Hotels Brand Differentiation through Customer Relationship Management case memo should have a strategy. A strategy is a strategy that involves firms seeking uncontested market spaces, which makes the competition of the company irrelevant. It involves coming up with new and unique products or ideas through innovation. This gives the organization a competitive advantage over other firms, unlike a red ocean strategy. 13. Competitors analysis of Hilton Hotels Brand Differentiation through Customer Relationship Management The PESTEL analysis discussed previously looked at the macro environmental factors affecting business, but not the microenvironmental factors. One of the microenvironmental factors are competitors, which are addressed by a competitor analysis. The Competitors analysis of Hilton Hotels Brand Differentiation through Customer Relationship Management looks at the direct and indirect competitors within the industry that it operates in. • This involves a detailed analysis of their actions and how these would affect the future strategies of Hilton Hotels Brand Differentiation through Customer Relationship Management . • It involves looking at the current market share of the company and its competitors. Email us for Any Case Solution at: [email protected] Note: This article is just a sample and not an actual case solution. If you want original case solution, please place your order on the Email. Please do check Junk/Spam folder of your E-mail for our reply, if not in Inbox.

Email us for Any Case Solution at: [email protected] • It should compare the marketing mix elements of competitors, their supply chain, human resources, financial strength etc. • It also should look at the potential opportunities and threats that these competitors pose on the company. 14. Organisation of the Analysis into Hilton Hotels Brand Differentiation through Customer Relationship Management Case Study Solution Once various tools have been used to analyse the case, the findings of this analysis need to be incorporated into practical and actionable solutions. These solutions will also be the Hilton Hotels Brand Differentiation through Customer Relationship Management case answers. These are usually in the form of strategies that the organisation can adopt. The following step-by-step procedure can be used to organise the Harvard Business case solution and recommendations: • The first step of the solution is to come up with a corporate level strategy for the organisation. This part consists of solutions that address issues faced by the organisation on a strategic level. This could include suggestions, changes or recommendations to the company's vision, mission and its strategic objectives. It can include recommendations on how the organisation can work towards achieving these strategic objectives. Furthermore, it needs to be explained how the stated recommendations will help in solving the main issue mentioned in the case and where the company will stand in the future as a result of these. • The second step of the solution is to come up with a business level strategy. The HBR case studies may present issues faced by a part of the organisation. For example, the issues may be stated for marketing and the role of a marketing manager needs to be assumed. So, recommendations and suggestions need to address the strategy of the marketing department in this case. Therefore, the strategic objectives of this business unit (Marketing) will be laid down in the solutions and recommendations will be made as to how to achieve these objectives. Similar would be the case for any other business unit or department such as human resources, finance, IT etc. The important thing to note here is that the business level strategy needs to be aligned with the overall corporate strategy of the organisation. For example, if one suggests the organisation to focus on differentiation for competitive advantage as a corporate level strategy, then it can't be recommended for the Hilton Hotels Brand Differentiation through Customer Relationship Management Case Study Solution that the business unit should focus on costs. Email us for Any Case Solution at: [email protected] Note: This article is just a sample and not an actual case solution. If you want original case solution, please place your order on the Email. Please do check Junk/Spam folder of your E-mail for our reply, if not in Inbox.

Email us for Any Case Solution at: [email protected] • The third step is not compulsory but depends from case to case. In some HBR case studies, one may be required to analyse an issue at a department. This issue may be analysed for a manager or employee as well. In these cases, recommendations need to be made for these people. The solution may state that objectives that these people need to achieve and how these objectives would be achieved. The case study analysis and solution, and Hilton Hotels Brand Differentiation through Customer Relationship Management case answers should be written down in the Hilton Hotels Brand Differentiation through Customer Relationship Management case memo, clearly identifying which part shows what. The Hilton Hotels Brand Differentiation through Customer Relationship Management case should be in a professional format, presenting points clearly that are well understood by the reader. 15. Alternate solution to the Hilton Hotels Brand Differentiation through Customer Relationship Management HBR case study It is important to have more than one solution to the case study. This is the alternate solution that would be implemented if the original proposed solution is found infeasible or impossible due to a change in circumstances. The alternate solution for Hilton Hotels Brand Differentiation through Customer Relationship Management is presented in the same way as the original solution, where it consists of a corporate level strategy, business level strategy and other recommendations. 16. Implementation of Hilton Hotels Brand Differentiation through Customer Relationship Management Case Solution The case study does not end at just providing recommendations to the issues at hand. One is also required to provide how these recommendations would be implemented. This is shown through a proper implementation framework. A detailed implementation framework helps in distinguishing between an average and an above average case study answer. A good implementation framework shows the proposed plan and how the organisations' resources would be used to achieve the objectives. It also lays down the changes needed to be made as well as the assumptions in the process. • A proper implementation framework shows that one has clearly understood the case study and the main issue within it. • It shows that one has been clarified with the HBR fundamentals on the topic. Email us for Any Case Solution at: [email protected] Note: This article is just a sample and not an actual case solution. If you want original case solution, please place your order on the Email. Please do check Junk/Spam folder of your E-mail for our reply, if not in Inbox.

Email us for Any Case Solution at: [email protected] • It shows that the details provided in the case have been properly analysed. • It shows that one has developed an ability to prioritise recommendations and how these could be successfully implemented. • The implementation framework also helps by removing out any recommendations that are not practical or actionable as these could not be implemented. Therefore, the implementation framework ensures that the solution to the Hilton Hotels Brand Differentiation through Customer Relationship Management Harvard case is complete and properly answered. 17. Recommendations and Action Plan for Hilton Hotels Brand Differentiation through Customer Relationship Management case analysis For Hilton Hotels Brand Differentiation through Customer Relationship Management, based on the SWOT Analysis, Porter Five Forces Analysis, PESTEL Analysis, VRIO analysis, Value Chain Analysis, BCG Matrix analysis, Ansoff Matrix analysis, and the Marketing Mix analysis, the recommendations and action plan are as follows: • Hilton Hotels Brand Differentiation through Customer Relationship Management should focus on making use of its strengths identified from the VRIO analysis to make the most of the opportunities identified from the PESTEL. • Hilton Hotels Brand Differentiation through Customer Relationship Management should enhance the value creating activities within its value chain. • Hilton Hotels Brand Differentiation through Customer Relationship Management should invest in its stars and cash cows, while getting rid of the dogs identified from the BCG Matrix analysis. • To achieve its overall corporate and business level objectives, it should make use of the marketing mix tools to obtain desired results from its target market. Email us for Any Case Solution at: [email protected] Note: This article is just a sample and not an actual case solution. If you want original case solution, please place your order on the Email. Please do check Junk/Spam folder of your E-mail for our reply, if not in Inbox.

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Case Study of Hilton Hotel (pdf)

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Hilton case study

Delivering the Brand Promise with Business English

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Hilton is one of the largest and fastest-growing hospitality companies in the world, with more than 4,900 properties comprising over 800,000 rooms in 104 countries and territories.

Business Challenge

With a largely English-speaking customer base that demands the highest level of quality and service, Hilton needed a global strategy for building the Business English communication skills of its employees to help deliver on its brand promise.

After careful evaluation, Hilton implemented the Learnship Solo platform on a worldwide basis and has realized significant productivity and performance improvements.

“Learnship is a unique e-learning provider in that it has understood the challenges of running a global business and provided solutions that are helping us improve our team, our culture and, ultimately, our competitive advantage.” —John Guthrie, Head of International Management Development, Hilton International

Overall, 71% of Hilton International employees have been able to save more than one hour per week because of their improved Business English skills.

The majority of Hilton International learners reported improved performance on the job.

Employees have improved their performance in dealing with customers, conducting negotiations, interacting with management, participating in meetings, reading and writing emails, and talking on the phone.

*Learnship Solo was previously called GlobalEnglish One

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Groundbreaking graduate selection & development at hilton.

Hilton Group

Hilton Group is an international hospitality company, operating 5,500 properties in 109 countries. Hilton has a strong focus on recruiting graduates into the group to move quickly into management positions across its portfolio.

Despite some significant improvements in retention rates between 2013-16, Hilton had seen a fall in graduate retention during 2017. Research established attrition hot-spots at 3-4 months and 16-18 months, with graduates leaving because they felt that they would not be able to pursue careers in Hilton in areas that they really enjoyed and which energised them.

As a result, Hilton approached Strengthscope to help develop a solution which would attract and retain graduates for whom Hilton would provide an excellent fit personally and as regards their future careers.

Our solution

Graduates introduced to their strengths using Strengthscope®

The programme started with a personal development module where graduates were introduced to their strengths using Strengthscope®, as well as receiving 360 degree feedback from past and present colleagues on where their strengths might best be deployed. Strengthscope® data was used to inform subsequent programme design which could therefore be perfectly tailored to the Hilton graduate context, with the aim of improving retention by building graduate confidence and engagement.

Hilton developed strengths-based training modules incorporating Strengthscope®, including: stress awareness, building effective teams, managing your personal brand and taking control of your career. Along with Hilton’s existing development infrastructure (mentoring, line management and career support), this programme provided a highly relevant and individual experience to each graduate.

The next stage of the project saw Strengthscope® and strengths-based interviewing introduced to the recruitment process to select the best possible graduate pool available. This involved job analysis and interview design to help attract and select those candidates most likely to thrive in the Hilton environment.

Since launching the strengths-based approach, Hilton has achieved a 70% increase in applications

Within 6 months, Hilton’s graduate retention rate improved to 81% (an increase of 14%)

Hilton’s Graduate Programme supported me in positively stretching myself beyond my comfort zone by using my strengths and those of others in my team. I’ve seen how creating teams who all share the Hilton values, yet have a range of strengths, improves guests’ experiences. Understanding how others see your strengths, especially when they are in overdrive, is useful too. The knowledge the programme gives you about strengths enables you to influence decisions and behaviour and gives you confidence that you can grow your role and progress through the organisation.

Bert Serry, Graduate Recruit, Hilton UK & Ireland

Within the first six months of its implementation, we are already seeing significant positive impacts of our graduate recruitment and retention programme. It is already strengthening our business by allowing our graduates to ‘travel with purpose’ through their careers with Hilton, which is also in line with our CSR strategy. We are all very proud of the programme, the team that developed and delivered it and our talented graduates.

Steve Cassidy, Senior Vice President of Operations for UK & Ireland, Hilton UK

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Hilton Manufacturing Co. Harvard Case Solution & Analysis

Home >> Accounting Case Solutions >> Hilton Manufacturing Co.

The contribution margin has been calculated for all the three products of the company based on a per units basis, per dollar basis and per capacity basis where labor hours per unit are taken as the capacity basis. Contribution is the difference between the sales price of the product and the variable costs of the products. Among all the three Hilton’s products the product 101 has the highest contribution margin of 4.60 per units, 49% and 198% on all the three basis respectively. The total contribution is the factor which is used here to decide which the most profitable product of the company is.

hilton manufacturing company case solution

hilton manufacturing company case solution

The management of Hilton Manufacturing first of all needs to make sure that dropping the product 103 does not means in any sense that the sales of the other two products will increase. On the other hand, the fixed costs of the company would also remain constant and they would then be distributed among the two products only (101 and 102). If the company drops the product 103, it will have a negative effect on the contribution margin of the company and the company will have lower margins to handle the amount of fixed costs of the company. The calculations performed in the spreadsheet show that if the company drops the product 103, the profit for the company will turn into loss. Although it is negative currently also, but after dropping 103, the loss would increase by huge proportion because of the fixed costs which are constant. Apart from this if product 103 is currently unprofitable, it still would be absorbing some of the fixed costs of the company. Therefore, the management should not drop the product 103.

QUESTION 3A

The company has two options, it could reduce the price of the product to $ 8.64 cwt with the sales units of 1000000 to gain a competitive advantage in the industry or it could still maintain the same price of $ 9.41 with a unit sales level of 750000, under which also the company could come up with new value proposition to attack its competitors. The company can for example, introduce a technology to reduce the variable costs of the products. However, the calculations have been performed under both the prices and the contribution margin has been calculated for this product. The 5% increase in the prices of the materials and supplies has also been incorporated and the sales level has also been changed. Based on the results, the contribution margin under the new price is higher by $ 1509200. This is a huge increase in the contribution and the profit for the whole company would also improve. Therefore, the management of Hilton manufacturing company should reduce the price of the product 101.

QUESTION 3B

The previous contribution margin of 4.60 per unit for product 101 was based on a units level of 996859. However, if the price of the product has been reduced to $ 8.64, then the new unit level can be calculated which would give the same contribution margin for product 101. The calculation has been performed in the spreadsheet and this new units level is 991606 units. Looking at the difference in the units, and the higher contribution margin of this product, the company should reduce its price to $ 8.64 cwt.......................

This is just a sample partial case solution. Please place the order on the website to order your own originally done case solution.

Professional manager hires a small manufacturing company after the president finds that he made the wrong decision. One product is a loss, while the product is being sold at a high volume is pressurized competitive price. Crude cost accounting system can not identify the appropriate measures to resolve the problem. "Hide by William J. Bruns Jr. Source: Harvard Business School 6 pages. Publication Date: October 11, 1991. Prod. #: 192063-PDF-ENG

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An analytical solution to predict slip-buckling failure of bedding rock slopes under the influence of top loading and earthquakes: Case studies of Hejia landslide and Tangjiashan landslide

  • Technical Note
  • Published: 02 April 2024

Cite this article

  • Leilei Jin 1 ,
  • Guanghong Ju 2 ,
  • Zhengfeng Chen 3 ,
  • Qianfeng Xiao 1 ,
  • Wenxi Fu 1 ,
  • Fei Ye   ORCID: orcid.org/0000-0002-9315-9621 1 &
  • Yufeng Wei 1  

Slip-buckling failure is a common occurrence in bedding rock slopes, and it can be triggered by long-term gravitational stress, earthquakes, top loading and intense rainfall. In this paper, an analytical solution is proposed to address the slip-buckling failure of bedding rock slopes under the influences of top loading and earthquakes based on mechanical analysis and energy equilibrium theory. The rock layers of bedding slopes are treated as inclined plate beams with hinge support at the slope top and fixed support at the slope toe. The equation for the deflection curve of each rock column of the bedding rock slope under earthquake and top loading can be derived by analysing the forces acting on each rock layer. According to the energy equilibrium theory, the deformation energy of the rock column equals the work done by external forces, from which the critical length of a slope rock layer for slip-buckling failure can be determined. The location of the toe of the rupture surface, where slip-buckling failure occurs, corresponds to the point of maximum deflection on the deflection curve of the rock layer. Clearly, the location of the toe of the rupture surface is where the first derivative of the deflection curve equation equals zero. This approach has been applied to the Hejia landslide and Tangjiashan earthquake-triggered landslide, and the calculation results are in good agreement with the field investigation results.

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The authors wish to thank National Key R&D Program of China (Grant No. 2022YFC308100) and the National Nature Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 42377145 and 42072303) for financial support.

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Jin, L., Ju, G., Chen, Z. et al. An analytical solution to predict slip-buckling failure of bedding rock slopes under the influence of top loading and earthquakes: Case studies of Hejia landslide and Tangjiashan landslide. Landslides (2024). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10346-024-02232-w

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Published : 02 April 2024

DOI : https://doi.org/10.1007/s10346-024-02232-w

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  24. An analytical solution to predict slip-buckling failure of ...

    Slip-buckling failure is a common occurrence in bedding rock slopes, and it can be triggered by long-term gravitational stress, earthquakes, top loading and intense rainfall. In this paper, an analytical solution is proposed to address the slip-buckling failure of bedding rock slopes under the influences of top loading and earthquakes based on mechanical analysis and energy equilibrium theory ...

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