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Writing the Basic Business Letter

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Media File: Writing the Basic Business Letter

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Parts of a Business Letter

This resource is organized in the order in which you should write a business letter, starting with the sender's address if the letter is not written on letterhead.

Sender's Address

The sender's address usually is included in letterhead. If you are not using letterhead, include the sender's address at the top of the letter one line above the date. Do not write the sender's name or title, as it is included in the letter's closing. Include only the street address, city, and zip code.

The date line is used to indicate the date the letter was written. However, if your letter is completed over a number of days, use the date it was finished in the date line. When writing to companies within the United States, use the American date format. (The United States-based convention for formatting a date places the month before the day. For example: June 11, 2001. ) Write out the month, day and year two inches from the top of the page. Depending which format you are using for your letter, either left justify the date or tab to the center point and type the date. In the latter case, include the sender's address in letterhead, rather than left-justified.

Inside Address

The inside address is the recipient's address. It is always best to write to a specific individual at the firm to which you are writing. If you do not have the person's name, do some research by calling the company or speaking with employees from the company. Include a personal title such as Ms., Mrs., Mr., or Dr. Follow a woman's preference in being addressed as Miss, Mrs., or Ms. If you are unsure of a woman's preference in being addressed, use Ms. If there is a possibility that the person to whom you are writing is a Dr. or has some other title, use that title. Usually, people will not mind being addressed by a higher title than they actually possess. To write the address, use the U.S. Post Office Format. For international addresses, type the name of the country in all-capital letters on the last line. The inside address begins one line below the date. It should be left justified, no matter which format you are using.

Use the same name as the inside address, including the personal title. If you know the person and typically address them by their first name, it is acceptable to use only the first name in the salutation (for example: Dear Lucy:). In all other cases, however, use the personal title and last/family name followed by a colon. Leave one line blank after the salutation.

If you don't know a reader's gender, use a nonsexist salutation, such as their job title followed by the receiver's name. It is also acceptable to use the full name in a salutation if you cannot determine gender. For example, you might write Dear Chris Harmon: if you were unsure of Chris's gender.

For block and modified block formats, single space and left justify each paragraph within the body of the letter. Leave a blank line between each paragraph. When writing a business letter, be careful to remember that conciseness is very important. In the first paragraph, consider a friendly opening and then a statement of the main point. The next paragraph should begin justifying the importance of the main point. In the next few paragraphs, continue justification with background information and supporting details. The closing paragraph should restate the purpose of the letter and, in some cases, request some type of action.

The closing begins at the same vertical point as your date and one line after the last body paragraph. Capitalize the first word only (for example: Thank you) and leave four lines between the closing and the sender's name for a signature. If a colon follows the salutation, a comma should follow the closing; otherwise, there is no punctuation after the closing.

If you have enclosed any documents along with the letter, such as a resume, you indicate this simply by typing Enclosures below the closing. As an option, you may list the name of each document you are including in the envelope. For instance, if you have included many documents and need to ensure that the recipient is aware of each document, it may be a good idea to list the names.

Typist initials

Typist initials are used to indicate the person who typed the letter. If you typed the letter yourself, omit the typist initials.

A Note About Format and Font

Block Format

When writing business letters, you must pay special attention to the format and font used. The most common layout of a business letter is known as block format. Using this format, the entire letter is left justified and single spaced except for a double space between paragraphs.

Modified Block

Another widely utilized format is known as modified block format. In this type, the body of the letter and the sender's and recipient's addresses are left justified and single-spaced. However, for the date and closing, tab to the center point and begin to type.

The final, and least used, style is semi-block. It is much like the modified block style except that each paragraph is indented instead of left justified.

Keep in mind that different organizations have different format requirements for their professional communication. While the examples provided by the OWL contain common elements for the basic business letter (genre expectations), the format of your business letter may need to be flexible to reflect variables like letterheads and templates. Our examples are merely guides.

If your computer is equipped with Microsoft Office 2000, the Letter Wizard can be used to take much of the guesswork out of formatting business letters. To access the Letter Wizard, click on the Tools menu and then choose Letter Wizard. The Wizard will present the three styles mentioned here and input the date, sender address and recipient address into the selected format. Letter Wizard should only be used if you have a basic understanding of how to write a business letter. Its templates are not applicable in every setting. Therefore, you should consult a business writing handbook if you have any questions or doubt the accuracy of the Letter Wizard.

Another important factor in the readability of a letter is the font. The generally accepted font is Times New Roman, size 12, although other fonts such as Arial may be used. When choosing a font, always consider your audience. If you are writing to a conservative company, you may want to use Times New Roman. However, if you are writing to a more liberal company, you have a little more freedom when choosing fonts.

Punctuation

Punctuation after the salutation and closing - use a colon (:) after the salutation (never a comma) and a comma (,) after the closing. In some circumstances, you may also use a less common format, known as open punctuation. For this style, punctuation is excluded after the salutation and the closing.

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How to Address a Letter: Addressing a Letter 101

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how to address a letter

Table of Contents

How to write an address on a letter in 4 steps, letter address format examples, how to write a certified letter, how to address a letter conclusion.

Addressing a letter is one of the first and most important steps in letter writing. A clearly written address means your letter is more likely to arrive with the correct recipient.

If you don’t know how to address a letter, you’re in luck because it’s a straightforward process once you know what to include and how to format it.

In this article, we’ll cover how to address a letter in four simple steps, and we’ll share some examples of letter formats so you can see how it’s done.

Letters are still a popular form of communication today, especially for important information and requests, so it’s a good idea to familiarize yourself with how to address a letter. We’ve condensed it down to four easy steps.

Where Do I Write an Address in a Letter?

The first thing you should write in a formal or professional letter is your address at the top of the page. You can write it on the left or the right side of the page, depending on which format you intend to use in your letter.

When using a block format letter, you will need to align everything to the left. Write your address, then the date you’re writing the letter, and then add your recipient’s address all on the left. You’ll find a lot of businesses use this format in their formal letters.

If you are using an indented paragraph format in your letter, align your address and the date to the right. Start your recipient’s address on the line below the date, and align it to the left.

You should always align the receiver’s address on the left because it helps if you want to use a windowed envelope to send your business letter. The window should line up perfectly with where the receiver’s address is so you won’t need to type or write out their address on the envelope.

letter writing tip

For personal and informal letter writing, both addresses are optional. If you want to include them, it is common to use the formatting style from the indented paragraph format when writing a personal letter. You’ll still need to include the address on the envelope so it reaches the right destination, though.

What Should I Include When Addressing a Letter?

When you address a letter to someone, you need to include the correct information on both the letterhead and the envelope to ensure it reaches the right person. 

Your address should include the following information:

Your full name or company name

The street address, including building number or name

The city, state, and zip code

Country name

You should include the following information in your recipient’s address:

Their full name

Their job title

The company name

letter sender's address information

You’ll need to include the recipient’s job title and company name if you are writing a formal or business letter where it is being sent to the company they work for. If you’re not sure of their job title, you can call the company and ask for that information. Your letter will look more professional if you have done research to ensure the details are correct.

If you’re writing your recipient’s address on the envelope rather than using a windowed envelope, the job title isn’t necessary because that address is for the postal service to use. The individual who processes mail for the business you're writing to should be able to identify the right person to give the letter to.

letter recipient's address information

What Abbreviations Can I Use in an Address?

You don’t always need to write street addresses out in full when you are addressing a letter. USPS has a list of abbreviations you can use when writing an address. Postal services are familiar with abbreviations, so you don’t need to worry about them preventing your letter from being delivered to the correct address.

Here are some of the most common suffix abbreviations you should familiarize yourself with:

Avenue: AVE

Boulevard: BLVD

Crescent: CRES

Crossing: XING

Estate: EST

Highway: HWY

Junction: JCT

Meadow: MDW

You can find more abbreviations for other address suffixes on the USPS website if you don’t see the one you need on our list.

how to write a formal letter with address

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When to Add a Return Address

Postal services use a return address to return your letter to you if they cannot deliver it to the receiver’s address on the envelope. If you want to ensure they send the letter back to you after a failed delivery, include your address on the envelope.

With USPS reporting that they deliver 421.4 million pieces of mail on average per day, it’s a good idea to include a return address in case any mistakes happen.

You can either include a return address on the back of the envelope or on the front, in the upper left-hand corner. Just make sure it’s clear that the address is a return or sender’s address so the postal service doesn’t confuse it with the recipient’s address.

Readability is one of the most important parts of writing an address. The information should be correct, but if the postal service cannot read it, they might not deliver the letter. You can improve the readability by writing in block capitals if you’re handwriting and following a specific format.

We’ve provided some formatting examples of how to address a letter so you can see what a well-formatted, readable address looks like.

Miss Jenny Smith

79 Blane Street

Saint Louis, MO 63108

Mr. Chris Jones

133 Oak Way

Omaha, NE 68102

Mrs. Sophie Doe

Director of Marketing

Big Marketing Business

1999 Ottis Street

Oklahoma City, OK 73102

Certified letters are mail that needs to be signed for by the recipient to prove they have received the letter. The most common use of certified letters is by financial institutions for demand letters informing the receiver they owe the company a sum of money.

Businesses can also use a certified letter for legal mail, sensitive documents, or if a company simply wants to send you some information and they need to be sure you received it.

If you need to send an important letter to a company, you can use the certified letter service. The service costs more than standard postage, so ask for the price and options at the post office when you’re sending your letter.

Sample of a Certified Letter

As a certified letter is a type of postal service and not a specific type of letter, your certified letter could be about anything of significance that needs a proof of delivery. We’ve provided a sample certified letter to give you an idea of how to format your letter so it looks professional and achieves the results you’re hoping for.

CERTIFIED MAIL - PROOF OF DELIVERY REQUIRED

Vista City Library

3139 Carriage Court

Vista, CA 92083

February 7th, 2022

Miss Janet Doe

3958 Vernon Street

RE: UNPAID LIBRARY FEES

Dear Miss Jane Doe,

We have reviewed your Vista City Library account, and you have an outstanding amount of $200 for late fees.

I can see there are several books still checked out on your account, which is why the fees are increasing each month. I request you return the books and pay the outstanding balance on your account no later than February 21st, 2022.

You can make your payment in person at the library using cash or credit card. Alternatively, you can access your account to make a payment using our online system, which you can access from our website. If you are not sure of your login details, please contact our customer service team.

If we receive no payment by the date stated in this letter, we will serve a final notice and proceed with the legal collection process, as stated in our terms and conditions.

Please disregard this letter if you have already made the payment on your account.

Mr. John Smith

Library Manager

As this example is of a demand-style letter, we have used a letter format called the simplified style. The key feature of a simplified style format is that it includes a subject line under the recipient’s address. It’s good to include a subject line in a demand letter as it tells the reader what the letter is about straight away.

Addressing letters should be easy for you now if you’re following the steps detailed in this article. There are several ways to format the addresses and some helpful abbreviations for when you’re writing the address on the envelope.

Don’t forget to make sure the recipient’s street address details are correct if you want the letter to arrive at the correct location. You can always use an address checker online if you’re not completely sure of the details.

We hope this article helps you with any letters you have to send.

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How to Format a Formal Letter (with Examples)

Last Updated: January 26, 2024 Fact Checked

Sample Letters

Block style letter, ams style letter, sending a letter, expert interview, expert q&a.

This article was co-authored by Shannon O'Brien, MA, EdM and by wikiHow staff writer, Aly Rusciano . Shannon O'Brien is the Founder and Principal Advisor of Whole U. (a career and life strategy consultancy based in Boston, MA). Through advising, workshops and e-learning Whole U. empowers people to pursue their life's work and live a balanced, purposeful life. Shannon has been ranked as the #1 Career Coach and #1 Life Coach in Boston, MA by Yelp reviewers. She has been featured on Boston.com, Boldfacers, and the UR Business Network. She received a Master's of Technology, Innovation, & Education from Harvard University. This article has been fact-checked, ensuring the accuracy of any cited facts and confirming the authority of its sources. This article has been viewed 8,408,312 times.

Formal letters can come in handy when you need to communicate professionally. Maybe you’re emailing your boss about an upcoming vacation, confirming an appointment, asking for references, or resigning. No matter the case, a well-formatted formal letter can help you correspond with your boss or coworkers in an authoritative and organized manner. In the business world, there are 2 main types of formal letters: block style and Administrative Management Style (AMS). Block style is most widely known, while AMS is for quick internal memos; however, both styles are good to have in your tool belt.

Things You Should Know

  • Block style letters include your address, the date, the recipient’s address, and an opening and closing salutations.
  • AMS style letters also have your address, the date, and the recipient’s address, but they include an all-caps subject line instead of a salutation.

Shannon O'Brien, MA, EdM

  • If you live in the United States, write your date as June 15, 2017.
  • If you live in a European country, write your date as 15 June 2017.

Step 3 Put the recipient’s name beneath the date.

  • If you don’t know the recipient’s title, do some background research or call the company.

Step 4 Greet the recipient with a polite salutation.

  • Only use the greeting “To whom it may concern” as a last resort if you don’t know the recipient’s name or title.
  • If you typically address the recipient by their first name, it’s okay to address them as such in your letter.

Step 5 Compose the body of the letter.

  • “I am writing to confirm our arrangements for Sunday, March 26th in the Plaza Hotel at 6 PM. As we discussed, I will have the necessary paperwork on hand, along with additional information you may need. I believe this partnership will benefit both of our companies…”
  • “Since we last spoke, the Baking It website has gained over 50% more traffic and earned 11% more income through ads and affiliate links. Combining our expertise will certainly help us grow even more…”
  • “I have enclosed the initial deposit and will forward the remaining amount by Monday, March 27th, our agreed-upon date. I cannot thank you enough for supporting my business endeavors, and I look forward to working with you. Please reach out at (555)888-9000 if you have any questions…”

Step 6 Sign your letter with a formal goodbye.

  • If you’re printing your letter, leave enough space between your goodbye and printed name to physically sign your name.
  • If you’re emailing your letter, digitally sign the document .

Step 7 Add an enclosure to the bottom of the document if you’ve attached materials.

  • If you’re using a letterhead , you don’t need to put the sender’s address. Instead, begin the letter with the date in the top left corner.

Step 2 Place the date directly below your address.

  • For instance, your subject line could be something like, “YOU’RE INVITED TO METROPOLITAN MEDICAL CONFERENCE” or “YOUR PRESENCE IS REQUESTED IN TOWN SQUARE.”
  • If you’re sending your letter via email, make sure to also include a non-caps subject line in the email’s title field, even if it conveys the same message.

Step 5 Put together the body of your letter.

  • “On behalf of the University of Tennessee’s Arts Department, we would like to invite you and your family to a benefit banquet on Saturday, March 25th at the Tennessee Performing Arts Center. Your contribution to the theatre has not gone unnoticed, and we’d like to honor you as a leading Fine Arts professor…”
  • “As my resume indicates, I have hands-on experience working in the culinary field. I am have managed ten kitchens while implementing dining room customs and design changes…”

Step 6 Sign your name at the bottom of your letter.

  • Leave enough space for a physical or digital signature.

Step 7 Add any enclosures.

  • If you’re using a standard rectangular envelope, fold your letter in horizontal thirds.
  • If you’re using a square envelope, fold your letter in half horizontally and then in half vertically, so it forms a rectangle.
  • Try only folding your letter once, as a letter with too many creases could make your envelope bulky and more difficult to mail.

Step 3 Place the letter inside the envelope.

  • If you don’t like licking envelopes, no worries! Use some tape to seal it shut.

Step 4 Write your name and address in the top left-hand corner.

  • Typically, it costs $0.63 to mail a standard letter first class.
  • One stamp generally equals $0.63, but if your envelope is heavier than 1 oz of paper, it may need 1 or 2 stamps to cover the cost.
  • If you’re unsure how many stamps to use , head to your local post office to weigh your envelope.

Shannon O'Brien, MA, EdM

Reader Videos . By using this service, some information may be shared with YouTube.

  • Use 1 inch (2.5 cm) margins for all formal letters. [23] X Research source Thanks Helpful 0 Not Helpful 0
  • In cases where you represent a business, consider putting the business’s logo and address in the middle of the page as a background. Thanks Helpful 0 Not Helpful 0
  • Always proofread your letter before sending it. This way, you can catch grammatical errors before your boss or potential employer. Thanks Helpful 0 Not Helpful 0

how to write a formal letter with address

You Might Also Like

Write an Introductory Letter

Thanks for reading our article! If you’d like to learn more about writing letters, check out our in-depth interview with Shannon O'Brien, MA, EdM .

  • ↑ Shannon O'Brien, MA, EdM. Life & Career Coach. Expert Interview. 25 May 2021.
  • ↑ https://www.sjsu.edu/writingcenter/docs/handouts/Resignation%20Letters.pdf
  • ↑ https://owl.purdue.edu/owl/subject_specific_writing/professional_technical_writing/basic_business_letters/index.html
  • ↑ https://www.apa.org/advocacy/guide/sample-letters.pdf
  • ↑ http://www.zeepedia.com/read.php?the_appearance_and_design_of_business_messages_punctuation_styles_business_communication&b=72&c=17
  • ↑ https://www.usps.com/ship/letters.htm

About This Article

Shannon O'Brien, MA, EdM

To write a formal letter, start in the top left corner. Write the sender's name or business, then write their address on the next line and their phone number one line below that. Skip one line, then write the date out, like "November 16th, 2015." Skip another line, then write the recipients name, job title, and address on their own respective lines. Skip another line, then write the body paragraph of your letter, which should be no more than 3 paragraphs. When you're ready to sign off, include your name, job title, and contact information, as well as space for you to sign. If you're enclosing other materials with the letter, put "Enclosure" at the bottom of the page, followed by the name of the documents enclosed. For more information about writing formal and direct memos, continue reading! Did this summary help you? Yes No

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14 Simple Tips for How to Address a Letter

Written by  Shutterfly Community Last Updated: Feb 22, 2021

There are certain occasions in life when writing a letter is appropriate. It is always beneficial to know how to write one, when to send one and how to address one. Addressing your letters can be done effortlessly by keeping just a few tips up your sleeve.

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Transform your handwritten notes into convenient communication that will make a lasting impression, regardless of who you are writing to. Whether you are inviting guests to a party, writing a formal business letter, sending a cover letter or mailing a thank you message, utilizing the appropriate letter format will make your messages more attractive and save you time.

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Step by Step: How to Address a Letter

When addressing a letter, make sure you take into consideration the proper address format for the envelope as well as the letter itself. Follow the guidelines on how to address a letter below to create a streamlined process and get your letters to their intended recipients:

  • Address the letter with consideration to who you are writing to as well as the occasion.  The appropriate way to address a letter will depend on both of these details.
  • If you are writing an informal letter to someone close to you like a friend or a family member, use a personal greeting to address your recipient. A closer relationship with your recipient allows you to be less formal with the greeting you select. This salutation will be warm and reflective of your connection. Using the greeting, “Dear John,” is always a safe standby though. If you’re very close with the recipient, you can skip a title and address them by name or use a nickname.
  • If you are writing a business letter or any type of formal communication like wedding invitations, use formal letter format to address your recipient.  Formal correspondence calls for a different type of format than you would use if addressing a pen pal or a close recipient. If you’re sending a business letter, use business letter format which includes four parts— the sender’s address and contact information, the date, the inside address and the salutation. Write each of these parts, one after another, on the left side of your letter. If your formal communication is not in terms of business, you do not need to include all four parts that the business letter format does, only include the formal salutation.
  • Use the correct titles when addressing recipients in any type of formal communication.  Instead of writing “John Doe,” write “Mr. John Doe,” or instead of writing “Jane Doe,” write ” Mrs. Jane Doe.”
  • In a traditional address for a married couple who share the same last name, only use the last name once. Address a married couple using  “Mr.” and “Mrs.” followed by the shared last name. For example, “Mr. and Mrs. Doe.”
  • Address a couple that lives together with their appropriate titles joined together with “and.” For example, “Ms. Jane Doe and Mr. John Mark.”
  • When addressing an entire family use the family’s last name preceded by “The.”  For example, “The Smiths.”
  • Use professional titles when appropriate. Always use professional titles when addressing members of the clergy, elected officials, doctors or those who have earned their Ph.D. For example, “The Reverend Mr. John Doe,” or “Dr. Jane Doe.”
  • Use a general salutation when addressing a letter with no contact person.  For example, “To Whom it May Concern,” or “Dear Hiring Manager.”

If you’re looking for more detailed instructions and examples to ensure your letters are properly addressed, take a look at our specific “how-to” articles on letter etiquette. When it comes to baby showers, you can reference our guides on how to address a baby shower card and how to address a baby shower invitation . If you’re preparing for holiday cards, we have you covered with tips on how to address a Christmas card during the holiday season. Lastly, pay close to attention to our helpful tips on how to address a wedding invitation  and how to address graduation invitations since these are more formal occasions.

Addressing Your Envelope

Now, it’s time to address your envelope! To address an envelope properly you’ll need three things—a return address, the recipient’s address and a stamp. Use the tips below to address your envelopes properly.

  • Write the return address in the upper left-hand corner of the envelope or if you’d like you can place it on the back flap of the envelope. The return address is almost always the address of the sender, but in some cases, it could be the address of where you’d prefer the return mail to be sent. On the first line write the sender’s full name. The second line will include the sender’s street address and the final line will include the sender’s city, state and zip code.
  • Write the letter recipient’s address on the front of the envelope in the center using the correct titles above.  Writing the letter recipient’s address on the envelope will follow the same format as the return address. On the first line, address the recipient by name using the proper titles. On the second line, write the recipient’s street address and the final line will include the recipient’s city, state and zip code.
  • Don’t forget to add a postage stamp to your letter because it wouldn’t be a properly addressed envelope without one.  This will pay for the delivery of your letter and is usually adhered to the top right-hand corner of the envelope. Make sure that you have the correct postage stamp for your letter to assure that your message gets to where it is headed.

Specific Examples for How to Address a Letter

When addressing letters, remember to use the appropriate format and titles for the occasion at hand. There are many different occasions for writing a letter that will utilize different formats for addressing and sending. Use these examples for how to address a letter in order to visualize the above steps in action:

Addressing an Informal Letter:

Addressing a Formal Letter to a Married Couple:

Addressing a Business Letter: 

Addressing a Formal Letter to a Doctor: 

Address Etiquette

When you use standard conventions for addressing your letter, you can guarantee that your letters are well-received by your recipients. Follow our address etiquette guidelines to answer any other questions you may run into when drafting your letters.

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  • Avoid abbreviations when addressing your letters. For example, common road names should read “Lane,” “Avenue,” “Street,” and so on. States should be written out as well.
  • If you’re addressing your letter in handwriting, make sure that you are writing legibly and with blue or black ink.  Design an envelope that even the postal office will be impressed by!   You can make addressing your letters a little easier by adding custom return address labels which will save you time writing.
  • When addressing a letter on behalf of a business, use the company’s office address.
  • Add an extra special touch to your outgoing mail. Using  personalized stationery will add a creative element to your message and show just how much thought you put into your letter.

Don’t forget to have fun addressing your letters. Sending your thoughts on paper can be exciting and stress-free now that you have all the tips and tricks you need. If you’re looking to elevate your letters even more, use our guide on how to create formal address labels to help you customize your letter with style.

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Home » Letter Writing » How to Write Formal Letters: A Step-by-Step Guide

How to Write Formal Letters: A Step-by-Step Guide

Writing formal letters is a valuable skill, whether you’re a student, professional, or an individual addressing various situations. To craft an effective formal letter, follow these steps:

  • Your Address: Start your letter by writing your address at the top. This should include your House number, Street name, City, Country and PIN code.
  • Date: Just below your address, write the date when you are writing the letter. Remember to spell out the month, add the day, and put in the year.
  • Recipient’s Address: Leave a little space and then add the recipient’s name, their position (like Principal or Teacher), the name of the school, and the school’s address. If you are not sure of the person’s name, you can use a formal greeting like “To Whom It May Concern.” Salutation: Begin your letter with a polite greeting, for example, “Respected Principal” or “Respected Teacher.”
  • Opening Paragraph: In the first paragraph, clearly and briefly mention the reason you are writing the letter. For instance, if you’re writing to request information about a scholarship, specify which scholarship you’re interested in.
  • Main Body of the Letter: In the body of the letter, explain your purpose in more detail. Organize your thoughts logically using separate paragraphs. Use simple and correct language, and make sure your spelling and grammar are accurate.
  • Closing Paragraph: Summarize the main points of your letter and remind the reader about the purpose. If you’re attaching any documents or providing extra information, mention it here.
  • Formal Closing: End your letter with a formal closing, such as “Yours truly” or “Sincerely.” Use a comma (,) after the closing.
  • Your Signature: Leave enough space below the closing for your handwritten signature. If you’re typing the letter on a computer, a typed signature is okay.
  • Enclosures and CC: If you’ve added any extra documents or sent copies to others (CC), let the reader know at the end of the letter. For example: “Enclosures: Certificates, Mark Sheet” or “CC: Parent’s Name.”
  • Formatting: Make sure your letter looks neat with a clear font and a standard letter size. Keep your tone formal and respectful, and avoid using informal words or slang.
  • Proofreading: Before sending the letter, read it carefully to check for spelling or grammar mistakes. A well-written letter shows that you’re careful and thorough.
  • Mailing (if needed): If it’s a physical letter, put it in an envelope, write the recipient’s address, and add the right postage.

Writing a formal letter is an important skill. It can help you communicate effectively with your school, office or in other situations where you need to write a formal letter.

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How To Address a Formal Letter Step By Step (With Template)

It can be challenging to recall all the formal letter writing lessons you learned in school in the age of texting and direct messages. Years in your career may pass before you need to write anything more than a polished email. However, when looking for a job, networking for a job, or sending other business-related correspondence, the ability to write professionally is crucial.

When looking for a job, you must go above and beyond to appear qualified. When trying to impress a hiring manager and differentiate yourself from the competition, being casual just won’t cut it. Following the rules for addressing a letter or other professional correspondence is crucial for your career-related and business communications because it is the first thing a potential employer notices.

What to include in a formal letter address

This establishes your letter’s formal tone and lets the recipient know that you anticipate a response. Include the information below in this order whenever addressing formal correspondence:

What is a formal letter?

Formal letters have a strict, business-like format and are used for official communications. A formal letter must always begin with an address that includes the date, the names of the sender and the recipient, and a salutation. It’s crucial to understand proper letter writing etiquette when communicating professionally or for official purposes. Documents that typically include a formal letter address include:

A letter’s formal opening address conveys to the recipient that its contents are significant and consequential. The majority of formal letters serve as documentation of significant conversations, requests, or agreements.

Formal letter address template

Use this model if you’re unsure of how to start a formal letter:

Senders should include their name, company or employer, address, city, state, and ZIP code, as well as their phone number and email.

[ Date written ]

[Name of recipient], [Name of recipient’s business or employer], [Address of recipient], [City, State, and ZIP Code of recipient], [Email and phone number of recipient]

[ Greeting name: ]

How to address a formal letter

Follow these key steps when addressing a formal letter:

1. Alignment and margins

Keep all of the text aligned to the left and begin your formal letter’s address in the top left corner of the page. Because English is a left-to-right language, left-aligned text is simpler to read than right-aligned or centered text. A formal letter typically has 1 to 1-1 1/4 inch margins all around, including the top, bottom, and sides.

2. Start with your contact information

You desire for your recipient to understand right away who you are, what job you hold, and your return address. You can use either a business or home address. Depending on where you are sending it from. Here’s how it should look: :

There should be a full line of space after your contact information before the next line of text.

3. Write the date

Write the full date. Use numbers for the day and year, and spell out the month. This information serves as a crucial record for legal documents, contracts, and agreements and demonstrates when you wrote, signed, and sent the letter.

Example: February 21, 2020

Place another full line of space after the date.

4. Include the recipients contact information

Indicate who the letter is for and establish a connection by including the recipients’ business contact information. Format this information the same way you did yours:

Including all of your recipients information to avoid confusion. Follow it with another full line of space.

5. Include an “attention” line, if necessary

Include an “attention” line when writing to a business to designate the person or division you want to read the letter. Put a full space before the salutation and after the recipient’s contact information before the “attention” line.

Example: Attn: Jay Nero

7. Choose a salutation

Start your letter with a courteous and formal salutation, such as “Dear,” the recipient’s first and last names, and a colon. If you know the person well, only use their first name.

Example: Dear Dr. Hennings:

Titles include “Mr. ,” “Ms. ,” “Mrs. ,” “Dr. ,” “Honorable,” “the Reverand. ” and “Professor. If your recipient is a woman and you’re not sure if she’s married, select “Ms. ” rather than “Mrs. ” or “Miss. If she is addressed by a title other than “Ms.,” such as “Officer,” use that instead. ,” “Miss” or “Mrs. If you don’t know the recipient’s gender, remove the title and use their full name instead.

Example: Dear Pat Corres:

Following the salutation, you can start the introduction, body paragraph(s), conclusion, and signature on the following line.

Formal letter address examples

Review the examples below to get ideas for writing your own formal letter address:

Addressed to an individual

Here is an illustration of a formal letter to a person that is properly addressed:

Carly Henson Resolution Media 28 Carrbridge Road Durham, NC 27708 [email protected]

June 2, 2020

Parker Cary, MD Hammond Memorial Hospital 712 Industrial Drive Greensboro, NC 27401**919-376-3944

Dear Dr. Cary:

Addressed to a business

Here is an illustration of a formal letter that should be addressed to business:

Sydney Arthur Brooks and Banyon LLC 80 Superior Lane Magnolia, TX 77354 281-543-1669

January 14, 2019

Argento & Co. 731 Porter Drive Katy, TX 77494

Attn: Jen Curio

Greetings Human Resources Department:

How to address the envelope

Use a business-sized (#10) envelope for all mailed letters. Typed information is preferred. Fold your letter into thirds. On the front of the envelope, write the following:Your return address (name, address, city, state, and ZIP code)Make sure the appropriate amount of postage is placed in the top right cornerRecipient’s name and address (contact person, company, address, city, state, and ZIP code) On the envelope, omit any phone numbers or email addresses.

How to Address a Letter

How do you start a formal letter?

  • First line: Full name.
  • Second line: Company name.
  • Third line: Street address.
  • City or town in the fourth line, then the state name and zip code
  • The sender’s name should be listed first, and the address should be aligned to the left of that.

Which address goes first on a formal letter?

The majority of formal letters begin with “Dear” before the recipient’s name. You can use either title and surname or first name and surname. Nevertheless, you must use “Dear Sir or Madam” if you don’t know the recipient’s name.

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How to Write a Formal Letter

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Learn about our Editorial Policy .

Throughout life, most people will be required to write formal letters for different occasions. The accepted format of a formal letter, sometimes called a business letter, is precise and must be followed to be taken seriously.

How to Use the Sample Formal Letter

To use the sample letter, click on the image. At this point, you can either download it to your computer to use later or edit it to fit your needs and then save and download it. To download the letter click on the image and it will open in a new window. Then click on the download icon to save it to your computer.

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To edit the letter before downloading:

  • Click on the image.
  • Click on the area you want to edit and highlight the text there.
  • Change the text as needed.

If you need help to download the printable, this guide can be a useful resource.

Knowing what to write and how to write a formal letter is undoubtedly a skill you will use repeatedly throughout your professional life. Following the proper format is as important as what you actually write when it comes to formal letters.

Step 1: Gather Information

To write your letter, you will need to have information about yourself and the person you are writing to. You will need to include your address and any information about you that supports the purpose of the letter.

Information you need about the recipient of your letter includes:

  • Title (Dr., Reverend, Mrs.)
  • Company or organization name
  • Mailing address

When sending a formal letter, it is best practice to address it to a specific person. If you are unsure of whom to direct your letter, you could check the company website or call them directly. When you do not know the person's title or when you are unsure if it is a man or woman, you can simply use the person's full name alone.

Keep all of this information in one place where you can easily find it while writing your letter. This will make the actual letter writing process easier.

Step 2: Formatting

There is a generally accepted standard format for formal letters. Stick to this format and you will give the impression that you respect the formality of the situation and have put in the effort to research formatting. The Purdue Online Writing Lab offers specific guidelines in formatting a formal letter:

  • 12-point font
  • Times New Roman font
  • Single line spacing
  • 1.5-inch margins
  • Block format
  • Left alignment
  • Dates written as in this example: March 14, 1999 (with the month spelled out and the year containing four digits)

Step 3: Heading

The heading includes your address and the date; you do not put your name in the heading. It is acceptable to include your email address and phone number in the heading but is not required. The heading goes in the top left corner of the document in a block format, which means each line starts directly below the last.

If you include an email address, be sure it is professional. An email address such as [email protected] will look immature and unprofessional. When possible, create an email address that uses your first and last name only. The same standard goes for including a phone number. Only include a number where you can easily be reached or where there is an option to leave a message for you.

Step 4: Inside Address

The inside address includes the name and address of the person you are writing to. Oxford Dictionaries shares that this section of your letter should start four lines below the heading. Start with the recipient's title and full name. If you don't know the person's name you can use his or her title alone, but it is best to address the letter to a specific person. Below the name you will write the address with all words written out. For example, you should use 'Street' not the abbreviated 'st.'

Step 5: Salutation

The salutation is basically a greeting, like when you meet someone in person and say "Hello." This section should start two lines below the inside address. The most commonly used formal salutation, according to Scribendi , is 'Dear.' You would then include the recipient's title and name followed by a colon. For example, you might say "Dear Mr. Jones:"

Step 6: Body

The body of a letter is your actual message. In a formal letter you can have anywhere between one to three paragraphs in the body depending upon your purpose.

  • First paragraph - introduce yourself and your purpose for writing
  • Second paragraph - supply brief information supporting your purpose
  • Third paragraph - thank recipient for their time and reference any supplementary materials provided

The body of the letter should be placed two lines below the salutation, so you would skip one line in between them.

Step 7: Closing

The closing is how you say goodbye in a letter. Skip one line after the body then write your closing. After your closing phrase you want to leave several lines beneath, then type your full name. The space you leave will be where you physically sign the letter. Acceptable formal closings include:

  • Best Regards
  • Best Wishes

Always make sure to follow your closing with a comma.

Step 8: Editing

It is very important to check the format, spelling, and grammar in a formal letter before you send it. This kind of attention to detail shows your work ethic and ability to follow-through. You can use the spell check option on your computer as a starting point. Once you have done that, it is a good idea to ask someone else to examine the document. You should then check over the letter yourself one more time before completion. During editing you and your chosen reviewer should look for the following:

  • Correct spelling and word usage
  • Correct punctuations
  • Spacing and font
  • Use of correct grammar
  • Tone of letter - should be warm, respectful, and professional
  • Free of slang words and contractions
  • Proper title for recipient
  • Correct contact information for sender and recipient

The Best First Impression

A formal letter often provides the first impression of you to a professional you have not met. Follow the standard formatting guidelines and you will be taken seriously and respected.

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how to write a formal letter with address

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Create a form in Word that users can complete or print

In Word, you can create a form that others can fill out and save or print.  To do this, you will start with baseline content in a document, potentially via a form template.  Then you can add content controls for elements such as check boxes, text boxes, date pickers, and drop-down lists. Optionally, these content controls can be linked to database information.  Following are the recommended action steps in sequence.  

Show the Developer tab

In Word, be sure you have the Developer tab displayed in the ribbon.  (See how here:  Show the developer tab .)

Open a template or a blank document on which to base the form

You can start with a template or just start from scratch with a blank document.

Start with a form template

Go to File > New .

In the  Search for online templates  field, type  Forms or the kind of form you want. Then press Enter .

In the displayed results, right-click any item, then select  Create. 

Start with a blank document 

Select Blank document .

Add content to the form

Go to the  Developer  tab Controls section where you can choose controls to add to your document or form. Hover over any icon therein to see what control type it represents. The various control types are described below. You can set properties on a control once it has been inserted.

To delete a content control, right-click it, then select Remove content control  in the pop-up menu. 

Note:  You can print a form that was created via content controls. However, the boxes around the content controls will not print.

Insert a text control

The rich text content control enables users to format text (e.g., bold, italic) and type multiple paragraphs. To limit these capabilities, use the plain text content control . 

Click or tap where you want to insert the control.

Rich text control button

To learn about setting specific properties on these controls, see Set or change properties for content controls .

Insert a picture control

A picture control is most often used for templates, but you can also add a picture control to a form.

Picture control button

Insert a building block control

Use a building block control  when you want users to choose a specific block of text. These are helpful when you need to add different boilerplate text depending on the document's specific purpose. You can create rich text content controls for each version of the boilerplate text, and then use a building block control as the container for the rich text content controls.

building block gallery control

Select Developer and content controls for the building block.

Developer tab showing content controls

Insert a combo box or a drop-down list

In a combo box, users can select from a list of choices that you provide or they can type in their own information. In a drop-down list, users can only select from the list of choices.

combo box button

Select the content control, and then select Properties .

To create a list of choices, select Add under Drop-Down List Properties .

Type a choice in Display Name , such as Yes , No , or Maybe .

Repeat this step until all of the choices are in the drop-down list.

Fill in any other properties that you want.

Note:  If you select the Contents cannot be edited check box, users won’t be able to click a choice.

Insert a date picker

Click or tap where you want to insert the date picker control.

Date picker button

Insert a check box

Click or tap where you want to insert the check box control.

Check box button

Use the legacy form controls

Legacy form controls are for compatibility with older versions of Word and consist of legacy form and Active X controls.

Click or tap where you want to insert a legacy control.

Legacy control button

Select the Legacy Form control or Active X Control that you want to include.

Set or change properties for content controls

Each content control has properties that you can set or change. For example, the Date Picker control offers options for the format you want to use to display the date.

Select the content control that you want to change.

Go to Developer > Properties .

Controls Properties  button

Change the properties that you want.

Add protection to a form

If you want to limit how much others can edit or format a form, use the Restrict Editing command:

Open the form that you want to lock or protect.

Select Developer > Restrict Editing .

Restrict editing button

After selecting restrictions, select Yes, Start Enforcing Protection .

Restrict editing panel

Advanced Tip:

If you want to protect only parts of the document, separate the document into sections and only protect the sections you want.

To do this, choose Select Sections in the Restrict Editing panel. For more info on sections, see Insert a section break .

Sections selector on Resrict sections panel

If the developer tab isn't displayed in the ribbon, see Show the Developer tab .

Open a template or use a blank document

To create a form in Word that others can fill out, start with a template or document and add content controls. Content controls include things like check boxes, text boxes, and drop-down lists. If you’re familiar with databases, these content controls can even be linked to data.

Go to File > New from Template .

New from template option

In Search, type form .

Double-click the template you want to use.

Select File > Save As , and pick a location to save the form.

In Save As , type a file name and then select Save .

Start with a blank document

Go to File > New Document .

New document option

Go to File > Save As .

Go to Developer , and then choose the controls that you want to add to the document or form. To remove a content control, select the control and press Delete. You can set Options on controls once inserted. From Options, you can add entry and exit macros to run when users interact with the controls, as well as list items for combo boxes, .

Adding content controls to your form

In the document, click or tap where you want to add a content control.

On Developer , select Text Box , Check Box , or Combo Box .

Developer tab with content controls

To set specific properties for the control, select Options , and set .

Repeat steps 1 through 3 for each control that you want to add.

Set options

Options let you set common settings, as well as control specific settings. Select a control and then select Options to set up or make changes.

Set common properties.

Select Macro to Run on lets you choose a recorded or custom macro to run on Entry or Exit from the field.

Bookmark Set a unique name or bookmark for each control.

Calculate on exit This forces Word to run or refresh any calculations, such as total price when the user exits the field.

Add Help Text Give hints or instructions for each field.

OK Saves settings and exits the panel.

Cancel Forgets changes and exits the panel.

Set specific properties for a Text box

Type Select form Regular text, Number, Date, Current Date, Current Time, or Calculation.

Default text sets optional instructional text that's displayed in the text box before the user types in the field. Set Text box enabled to allow the user to enter text into the field.

Maximum length sets the length of text that a user can enter. The default is Unlimited .

Text format can set whether text automatically formats to Uppercase , Lowercase , First capital, or Title case .

Text box enabled Lets the user enter text into a field. If there is default text, user text replaces it.

Set specific properties for a Check box .

Default Value Choose between Not checked or checked as default.

Checkbox size Set a size Exactly or Auto to change size as needed.

Check box enabled Lets the user check or clear the text box.

Set specific properties for a Combo box

Drop-down item Type in strings for the list box items. Press + or Enter to add an item to the list.

Items in drop-down list Shows your current list. Select an item and use the up or down arrows to change the order, Press - to remove a selected item.

Drop-down enabled Lets the user open the combo box and make selections.

Protect the form

Go to Developer > Protect Form .

Protect form button on the Developer tab

Note:  To unprotect the form and continue editing, select Protect Form again.

Save and close the form.

Test the form (optional)

If you want, you can test the form before you distribute it.

Protect the form.

Reopen the form, fill it out as the user would, and then save a copy.

Creating fillable forms isn’t available in Word for the web.

You can create the form with the desktop version of Word with the instructions in Create a fillable form .

When you save the document and reopen it in Word for the web, you’ll see the changes you made.

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Sample Letter for Disputing Credit and Debit Card Charges

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Contact Your Credit or Debit Card Company

Send a dispute letter to your card company, consider contacting the seller, sample letter for disputing credit or debit card charges, report problems.

You must notify your credit or debit card company of any error you’re disputing within 60 days of the date that the first statement on which the charge appears was sent to you. Consumer protections for credit cards are stronger than protections for debit cards , but some debit card companies voluntarily offer more protections than the law requires. To best protect your rights, review your account statements carefully every month and submit any dispute right away.

Start by calling the card company’s customer service number to report the problem. Find the telephone number on your monthly statement or on the back of your card. Keep a record of who you spoke with and when. Follow up promptly with a letter. The sample below may help.

Many card companies may let you to submit your dispute online. You may have to set up an online account to do that. However, to fully protect yourself, follow up with a letter quickly.

After you call the card company or dispute the charge online, follow up right away with a letter disputing the charge. The letter is a written notice to the card company about the problem. Remember, you must send the letter within 60 calendar days of the date that the first statement on which the disputed charge appears was sent to you.

Make sure your letter includes

  • your name and account number
  • the dollar amount of the disputed charge
  • the date of the disputed charge
  • an explanation of why you think the charge is incorrect

Here are some possible reasons why you might believe a charge is incorrect:

  • The date or amount of the charge is wrong.
  • The charge is for goods or services that you didn’t accept or that weren’t delivered to you as agreed.
  • You were charged more than once for something.
  • You returned the item, but the credit wasn’t posted to your account.
  • You paid for the item, but the payment wasn’t posted to your account.
  • You didn’t authorize the transaction.

Send your letter to the address your card company lists for billing disputes, errors, or inquiries. Look on your monthly statement, the card company’s website, or your card agreement to get the right address. The address for billing disputes usually is different from the address where you send your payments.

Send your letter by certified mail, if possible. Ask for a return receipt so you have proof that the card company got your letter. Include with your letter copies of any receipts, checks, or other proof of the transaction. Hold on to your originals.

It also may help to contact the seller for problems you are having with debit or credit card charges. But for most problems, if you don’t first contact the card issuer, you could lose important rights that protect you due to the timing requirements.

When you contact the seller, keep a record of who you spoke with and when. If you resolve the problem, check back with your card company — often your bank — to make sure your account shows the proper credit or refund.

Use this sample letter to help you write your dispute letter.

[Your Name]

[Your Address, City, State, Zip Code]

[Name of Credit or Debit Card Company]

Attn: Billing Inquiries

[Address, City, State, Zip Code]

Re: Notice of disputed charge to Account No. [Your account number]

Dear [Contact Person or Billing Inquiries Division] :

I am writing to dispute a charge of [$______] to my [credit or debit card] account on [date of the charge] . The charge is in error because [explain the problem briefly. For example, the items weren’t delivered, I was overcharged, I returned the items, I did not buy the items, etc . ] .

[Add any additional explanation that may be helpful . For example, “I ordered the items on [date] . The seller promised to deliver the items to me on [date] , but I never received my order.” ]

I am requesting that the error be corrected, that any finance or other charges related to the disputed amount be credited to my account, and that I get an accurate statement.

Enclosed are copies of [describe any enclosed information, like sales slips, payment records, or documentation of shipment or delivery dates] supporting my position and experience. Please correct the error on my account promptly.

[Your name]

Enclosures: [List the documents you are enclosing. Send copies, not the originals.]

If you have an issue with your credit card or bank account, report it to the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau. Go to consumerfinance.gov/complaint or call (855) 411-CFPB (2372).

How do I write a letter of permission?

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FAQs about Writing a Letter of Permission

1. what is a letter of permission, 2. who should i address the letter to, 3. what information should i include in the letter, 4. how should i format the letter, 5. do i need to provide any supporting documents, 6. what should i do if i don’t receive a response, 7. can i send the letter via email, 8. what if my request is denied, 9. is it necessary to keep a copy of the letter for my records, 10. should i follow up after the permission is granted, 11. how long should i wait before following up on my request, 12. what if i need to make changes to my original request, how do i write a letter of permission.

Writing a letter of permission can be a straightforward task, as long as you follow the proper format and convey your message clearly. Start by addressing the letter to the appropriate person or organization, then introduce yourself and explain the purpose of your request. Be sure to include any relevant details and provide a clear and polite request for permission. Remember to thank the recipient for their time and consideration, and close the letter with your contact information in case they have any questions.

A letter of permission is a formal document that requests authorization to do something, such as use a copyrighted work, access a restricted area, or allow a minor to participate in an activity. It is a written record of seeking approval for a specific action or request.

It is important to address the letter of permission to the appropriate person or organization. If you are unsure who the correct recipient is, you may need to do some research or make a few phone calls to ensure it reaches the right person.

When writing a letter of permission, be sure to include your full name, contact information, the purpose of your request, and any relevant details about the situation. Clearly state what you are asking permission for and why it is important.

The letter should follow a standard business format, including the recipient’s address, salutation, body of the letter, and a polite closing. Use a professional tone and be sure to proofread for any grammatical errors or typos before sending it.

Depending on the nature of your request, you may need to include supporting documents or evidence to strengthen your case. This could include things like a copy of a copyrighted work, a map of the restricted area, or a consent form for the minor in question.

If you don’t receive a response to your letter of permission within a reasonable amount of time, it is appropriate to follow up with a phone call or another letter. Be sure to remain polite and professional, and express your willingness to provide any additional information if needed.

In many cases, it is acceptable to send a letter of permission via email, especially if you need a quick response. Be sure to follow proper email etiquette, including a clear subject line and a professional tone in the body of the email.

If your request for permission is denied, it is important to respect the decision and consider alternative options. You may want to seek clarification on why the request was denied and see if there are any conditions under which it could be approved in the future.

It is always a good idea to keep a copy of the letter of permission for your records, along with any supporting documents and any responses you receive. This can serve as a useful reference in the future, should the need arise.

If your request for permission is approved, it is courteous to follow up with a thank-you note or email to express your gratitude. This helps to maintain a positive and professional relationship with the recipient.

The amount of time you should wait before following up on your request for permission will depend on the urgency of the situation and any specific timelines mentioned in your initial letter. Use your best judgment and consider the circumstances.

If you need to make changes to your original request for permission, it is best to communicate those changes as soon as possible. You can do so in a follow-up letter or email, clearly outlining the modifications and any reasons for the changes.

In conclusion, writing a letter of permission requires attention to detail and a clear, polite, and professional tone. By following the proper format and addressing the recipient’s needs, you can increase the likelihood of receiving the permission you are seeking. Remember to keep a record of all correspondence and follow up as needed to maintain good communication throughout the process.

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  1. FREE 7+ Sample Addressing a Formal Letter Templates in PDF

    how to write a formal letter with address

  2. FREE 7+ Sample Addressing a Formal Letter Templates in PDF

    how to write a formal letter with address

  3. How to Write a Formal Letter

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COMMENTS

  1. How To Address a Formal Letter Step By Step (With Template)

    Your contact information, including your full name, company name, job title, address, phone number and email The date you sent the letter The recipient's contact information, including their full name, company name, job title, address, phone number and email A salutation, such as "Dear," the recipient's name and a colon

  2. 4 Ways to Address a Letter

    1 Put your name and address in the top left corner of the envelope. It's important to put your own address on the letter so the post office can return it if it can't be delivered. Use a pen or pencil to write your name in the top left corner of your envelope.

  3. How to Write a Letter: Step-By-Step Guide With Tips

    Choose your format (email, paper and mail, etc.) Write your contact information and date at the top if you're using block style (see below). On a new line write a salutation, such as "Dear Ms. Smith," or "To Whom It May Concern." Write the body of your letter in a standard paragraph format.

  4. 4 Ways to Address a Formal Letter

    1 Format your salutation as Dear (title) (surname). It is customary to begin formal letters with "Dear." The word "Dear" conveys warmth yet professionalism, and omitting it makes a letter seem less formal. 2 Follow the opening of your salutation with a courtesy title. After "Dear," follow with a courtesy title, such as Mr., Mrs., Dr., or Ms.

  5. Writing the Basic Business Letter

    To access the Letter Wizard, click on the Tools menu and then choose Letter Wizard. The Wizard will present the three styles mentioned here and input the date, sender address and recipient address into the selected format. Letter Wizard should only be used if you have a basic understanding of how to write a business letter.

  6. How to Address a Letter: Addressing a Letter 101

    The first thing you should write in a formal or professional letter is your address at the top of the page. You can write it on the left or the right side of the page, depending on which format you intend to use in your letter. When using a block format letter, you will need to align everything to the left.

  7. How to Write a Formal Letter: Formatting, Tone & Templates

    To write a formal letter, start in the top left corner. Write the sender's name or business, then write their address on the next line and their phone number one line below that. Skip one line, then write the date out, like "November 16th, 2015." Skip another line, then write the recipients name, job title, and address on their own respective ...

  8. Formal Letter Format: How to Write a Formal Letter

    1) Include your name and contact information The return address should be written in the top right-hand corner of a formal letter. This will usually your address, but could be any other address to which a reply should be sent. 2) Include the recipient's name and address

  9. How To Write a Formal Letter

    Image description When to use a formal letter format If you're planning on sending business correspondence, it's best to use a formal letter format to guide your writing. This ensures a professional tone and lays a solid foundation for building a professional relationship with the receiver of your correspondence.

  10. How to Address a Letter for Business: Our Expert Guide

    1. Add your contact information If you don't have a preprinted envelope, on the first line put your name, your company's name, street address, and zip code in the upper left corner. 2. Add the recipient's name Print it at the top line of the address block centered in the middle of the envelope, a few lines below your information. 3. Include a title

  11. How to Address a Letter: 9 Tips You Should Know

    1 Start by putting your contact information at the top. This longstanding rule makes sense: you want the person you're addressing to readily know who you are, where you're coming from, and how they can respond to you.

  12. 14 Simple Tips for How to Address a Letter

    Address a married couple using "Mr." and "Mrs." followed by the shared last name. For example, "Mr. and Mrs. Doe.". Address a couple that lives together with their appropriate titles joined together with "and.". For example, "Ms. Jane Doe and Mr. John Mark.". When addressing an entire family use the family's last name ...

  13. How to Write Formal Letters: A Step-by-Step Guide

    Your Address: Start your letter by writing your address at the top. This should include your House number, Street name, City, Country and PIN code. Date: Just below your address, write the date when you are writing the letter. Remember to spell out the month, add the day, and put in the year.

  14. How to write a formal letter

    How to write a formal letter Part of English Non-fiction writing Save to My Bitesize Remove from My Bitesize Jump to Introduction Video Purpose Tone and language Layout and structure...

  15. How To Address A Formal Letter

    Here is how you should address an envelope. — Write Return Address. First, you should write your return address in the upper left hand corner of the envelope. This should include the sender's name and full address. If the postal service is unable to deliver the letter, they will return it to you at this address.

  16. How To Address a Formal Letter Step By Step (With Template)

    Follow these key steps when addressing a formal letter: 1. Alignment and margins. Keep all of the text aligned to the left and begin your formal letter's address in the top left corner of the page. Because English is a left-to-right language, left-aligned text is simpler to read than right-aligned or centered text.

  17. How To Address a Letter: A Step-by-Step Guide With Examples

    Spell out the month and include the full year. For example, you might write, " July 26, 2021." A full date lets the recipient know when you sent the letter and allows them to give you a timely reply. 3. Find the recipient's information. Under the address, you can add the recipient's name and information.

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    Follow these steps to format a professional business letter: 1. Gather all necessary contact information. Start by inserting your contact information and the recipient's. Be sure to separate the sender and recipient information in the top left-hand corner of the letter. This way, your letter is properly addressed to the right place and the ...

  19. How to Write a Formal Letter

    Step 1: Gather Information. To write your letter, you will need to have information about yourself and the person you are writing to. You will need to include your address and any information about you that supports the purpose of the letter. Information you need about the recipient of your letter includes: Full name.

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  22. How do I write a letter of permission?

    Writing a letter of permission can be a straightforward task, as long as you follow the proper format and convey your message clearly. Start by addressing the letter to the appropriate person or organization, then introduce yourself and explain the purpose of your request. Be sure to include any relevant details and provide a clear and polite ...