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  • Master's in Professional Writing Online

Female student writing at desk

Master's (MS) in Professional Writing Online

100% online study option.

Fully online and 36 credits, the MS in Professional Writing pairs the convenience of learning from any location with the quality of an NYU graduate degree. Real-world assignments in core and elective courses allow you to build a comprehensive, digital writing portfolio before you graduate. MS in Professional Writing students develop their creative abilities with a focus on dynamic careers across a range of industries and evolving fields. Our curriculum encourages students to leverage new technologies while they confidently craft content that has measurable impact.

You are the future of writing. We are your people.

It’s almost impossible to explain the odd, wonderful, frustrating compulsion that drives the creative writing impulse. If you are a pocket-journal scribbler, a life-long learner, or a lover of words (of arranging them, deleting them, and sometimes even inventing them), the MS in Professional Writing is the gold-standard to level up or pivot into a passion-fueled career. 

Our flexible, online MS in Professional Writing prepares the next generation of writers for a broad spectrum of senior-level  writing careers , preparing students with irreplaceable expertise in a world of A.I. innovations. 

Develop the skills for innovative full-time and freelance writing careers in technical writing/UX writing, science writing, business communications, writing for digital media/content creation, medical writing, financial writing, grant writing and more.

Degree Advantages

Anyone can learn writing skills, but not everyone is born with the drive and instinct to tell stories. We go beyond typical writing instruction to elevate your writing practice and natural storytelling abilities.

  • Be the human voice: In a world of AI-generated content language, learn to champion humanity in your work.
  • Precision in every word: Craft messages, strip away jargon, break down complexity, and let your message shine.
  • Radically empathetic writing: Step into your audience's shoes, immerse yourself in their world, and track how well your messages resonate with them.
  • Weave integrity into your words: Use your talents ethically and respect your audiences with a commitment to honest and accurate content.
  • Be a chameleon of communication: Shape-shift your style for the canvas at hand. Develop an unstoppable command of unique tones, styles, and voices for traditional and digital spaces.
  • Proofreading finesse: Edit, refine, revise, and polish prose to create content that wins hearts and minds.

Program At-A-Glance

  • Flexible, fully online
  • Complete in 3 semesters (full-time) or 6 semesters (part-time)
  • Core curriculum : Foundational courses give you the safety and confidence that comes with a firm command of the basics, allowing you to dive deeper into your writing and editing practice.
  • Electives: Elective courses provide an extensive and nuanced understanding of your industry specific styles, supporting your personal, professional writing goals.
  • Internship or Directed Study: Earn course credit for real-world experiences with professional internships or a mock-freelance-directed study.
  • Thesis and Digital Portfolio: Your hard work culminates in your final semester with an original thesis project and an individual digital writing portfolio, showcasing your unstoppable work.

VIEW FULL CURRICULUM AND DEGREE REQUIREMENTS>

Quick links:, explore graduate opportunities at nyu sps.

Join an upcoming online session to learn more about our graduate degree programs including the MS in Professional Writing. As an attendee of an Explore Graduate Opportunities at NYU SPS session, you will meet members of our team and have the opportunity to ask questions about the program and application process.

6:00 PM until 7:30 PM EDT  

Application Deadlines

Want to start in the Fall, Spring, or Summer? Make sure your application is complete and submit before the deadlines below:

Fall: July 1  Spring: January 5 Summer: March 1

What is the application process?

  • This isn’t required but is a great way to get more information on the program and application process. We’ll also waive the $150 application fee when you attend an Information Session.
  • Complete the online application
  • Request one reference letter
  • Upload your college/university transcripts
  • Upload your resume
  • Upload your personal statement (500 words)
  • Pay $150 application fee (waived when you attend an Information Session!)
  • Upload a writing portfolio with samples of your work (submit 10-15 pages of writing that you are proud of)

For additional application details, visit the NYU SPS Admissions page or contact the team at 212-998-7100 or  [email protected] .

Flexible Courses

Our master’s degree in professional writing offers a weekly guided structure that keeps you on track with optional opportunities to engage live, around your schedule. In each of our tech-forward and small-sized online writing classes , you get the most from our flexible workshop-model curriculum.  Guided by industry-expert faculty members, you will work through assignments that target corporate, academic, and real-world audiences to build your professional-quality writing portfolio.

Career-Focused Curriculum

It’s an exciting time for professional writers! Over the next 10 years, career opportunities for professional writers are projected to grow at a faster rate than average according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics. Our core courses equip you with powerhouse writing skills while our electives prepare you to be a fiercely competitive applicant for specific industries like:

  • Environment
  • Public Relations
  • Corporate Communications
  • Advertising
  • Grants and Fundraising

Writing Community

Mirroring the increasingly digital, global, and collaborative work environment of today’s professional world, the MS in Professional Writing brings faculty members, students, and guest lecturers together as part of an interactive, online educational community. Learn, write, edit, and revise writing projects with a cohort of classmates from NYC, across the country, and around the world.

Students join our program from all academic, professional, creative writing, and technical backgrounds. So whether you are hoping to graduate into senior writing positions, to feel confident about your writing skills, to advance your current career, or to pivot into a new professional path that feeds your passion, our professors support and mentor you towards your personal and professional goals.

Connect With Us

Your request has been submitted, department highlights, joining the mspw teaching team: introducing sophie plitt, joining the mspw teaching team: introducing simon mullin, scribe at spirit week: the translated and queer/banned book expo, joining the mspw teaching team: introducing patrick gray, 2023 website prototype projects by ms in professional writing students, networking with confidence: janel abrahami tells how, mspw student spotlight: vivian udeh’s ux writer internship at google, nyu sps club owls wins community engagement prize, 2022 nyu mspw convocation award recipients, mspw student spotlight: brandi addison, ai in the professions: professional writing, translation, and the new face of content creation, mspw announces documenting global pandemic experiences project, dr. kristine rodriguez kerr, academic director of the ms in professional writing, speaks at the 2019 words without borders gala, professional writer at work: interview with megan diamondstein, acting deputy director of marketing and communications & digital director for the center for reproductive rights, mspw & msti academic directors awarded faculty innovation and antiracism microgrant, nyu sps academic director and associate professor kristine rodriguez kerr is named an upcea diversity in leadership scholar, frequently asked questions, what is professional writing.

Professional writers are employed in many job titles and professional writing is everywhere! Just consider how much writing you see all day long. Depending on the context, professional writing can be clear and concise or creative and expansive. It can be organized for quick access or meandering for maximum storytelling impact. From brand voice to SEO keywords, professional writers are hard at work shaping messages, persuading audiences, and measuring impact.

From the marketing email in your inbox, to the political policy being read on TV, to the brand experience campaign in Times Square, to the website you're reading right now: all of that is professional writing.

Ranging from creative writing to technical writing, professional writers are paid for travel writing, blogging, documenting research, writing pamphlets, developing white papers, producing public relations strategies, sellings products with ad copy, creating annual reports, working on communication plans, and cracking jokes on social media.

In full-time writing positions, part-time jobs, and freelance writing careers, professional writers produce strategic copy for companies and clients in ways that leverage new and emerging technologies to reach target audiences.

What is an MS in writing?

An MS in Writing is a Master of Science degree in Writing. Earning this degree prepares graduates with advanced education and training in writing, style, and rhetoric with in-depth explorations of emerging communication practices, document design, and the principles of effective communication. We pride ourselves on a curriculum that has real-world relevance and prepares confident writers with the skills to craft strategic, ethical copy for companies and clients across industries.

Who should apply for the MS in Professional Writing?

Turn your passion for writing into a lucrative career. A masters in professional writing is a springboard to a myriad of flexible career opportunities. Our workshop-model curriculum is an exciting fit for English majors, journalists, liberal arts majors, creative writers, educators; those working in technology, medicine, and the sciences; as well as individuals in the fields of digital media and advertising or business communications.

If you love writing and want to build a career with your words; if you are ready for communication leadership roles; or if you are looking to pivot full-time to a passion project/industry you care about, we look forward to reviewing your application.

You can also use your time in the program to try a range of industries and writing roles before launching a career that matches your writing strengths and interests.

Is a professional writing degree worth it?

For those looking to make a career in writing, higher education is a wise investment to unlock new career paths and secure better job opportunities. As technology advances to produce lazy, canned copy in seconds, the world recognizes the value of better writers with a mastery of different styles now more than ever. While many feared AI-generated content would cannibalize writing jobs, employment opportunities are projected to increase over the next 10 years for talented and creative writers with technical skills and proven abilities. However, now that generative language can do the job of a junior role in seconds, the labor market will likely require writers to come in with a powerful human voice and unique command of language. Our faculty know this and our curriculum is geared for these shifts. Our classes help students leverage new technologies while they hone advanced storytelling techniques, precise editing skills, and critical communication practices. Words have power and professional writers have impact.

What industries hire professional writers?

Almost all industries have a need for writers. Our master’s degree prepares graduates for active and engaging  professional writing careers in sectors that include: technical writing, government, technology, education, financial, grant writing, nonprofit/fundraising, marketing copywriting, medical/healthcare/wellness, science/environment/energy, and corporate communications.

What kind of jobs do people with a master's in professional writing apply for?

The alumni from the MS in Professional Writing program at NYU SPS have moved into the following job titles:

  • Technical Editor/Technical Writer
  • Senior Director of Institutional Partnerships
  • Content Designer/UX Writer
  • Senior Medical Editor/Writer
  • VP, Marketing & Communications
  • Head Writer, In-house Marketing
  • Head of Content 
  • Assistant Director of Communications & Engagement
  • Freelance Writer/Editor
  • Marketing Copywriter

Why do I need a graduate degree in Professional Writing?

Earning an MS in Professional Writing from NYU will move you forward in your professional writing career—at any stage. Our coursework will help you improve your craft as a writer and you will graduate with a professional-quality writing portfolio and access to a network of professional peers. For those looking to make a career in writing, higher education is a wise investment to unlock new career paths and secure better job opportunities. Find out why in the “Is a professional writing degree worth it?” question above.

Does every student graduate with a writing portfolio?

Yes! Every MS in Professional Writing student curates their most exciting writing projects into an engaging, digital, professional-quality portfolio in their final semester to showcase their expert writing skills. Every class has multiple real-world assignments that could be included in a digital writing portfolio.

How long does it take to earn an MS in Professional Writing?

The MS in Professional Writing is a 36 credit degree program. If you choose to study full-time, you can complete your degree in as little as 3 semesters. Most part-time students complete the MS in Professional Writing degree in 6 semesters.

Is Financial Aid available for the MS in Professional Writing?

Yes! We encourage our applicants to  explore the financial aid and resources available to them. This includes a unique  scholarship opportunity for first-semester MS in Professional Writing students.

What’s unique about the MS in Professional Writing program at NYU School of Professional Studies?

Our students! With each class you take, you will build connections and cultivate an online writing community that will grow into your professional network. Students join the MS in Professional Writing program with a variety of interests, experiences, and individual goals. They know that their writing can foster understanding, communicate important messages, and create change in the world. And they have fun along the way.

A few other things that make our MS in Professional Writing unique:

  • High-touch, innovative workshop curriculum designed to match the flexible scheduling and tech-forward working life of professional writers. Learn more about the  online courses available in the MS in Professional Writing.
  • Specialized electives for industry exploration allow students to explore a range of interests and different styles of writing in their coursework. If students know what industry they're interested in, they can cluster their electives in that area to do a deep dive. 
  • Industry-experienced faculty members who are leaders in their professions and care deeply about impacting the next generation of writers in their fields. Faculty and industry leaders work together to continuously update our courses, preparing you with the latest communication skills and technical writing abilities needed to be a trailblazer in your work.
  • Technology-infused and career-focused curriculum combines traditional writing development and communication theories with emerging writing practices and platforms. While in the program, students explore media making and AI content generating tools, developing their ability to think strategically and lead communication projects confidently as they hone their writing craft.

We partner with the  NYU Wasserman Center for Career Development at NYU SPS to provide career coaching and connection to a global network of peers and professionals.

What are the benefits of our online Master's degree in Professional Writing?

  • Advance your skills to unlock new and exciting job opportunities for writers
  • Pursue your individualized career goals
  • Leverage the 600,000+ member NYU alumni network
  • Expand your writing skills, styles, and portfolio range
  • Transform creative writing skills and personal interests into lucrative career options
  • Learn to use technology and AI content generating tools to speed and support your writing practice

What will you learn in the online Master's degree in Professional Writing?

You will learn the elevated skills to graduate into senior-level writing positions in a variety of industries. Our core courses equip you with a firm writing foundation, while our electives sharpen your skills to be fiercely competitive in the job market as an in-house full-timer or a powerhouse freelancer.

Is it OK to get an online Master's degree?

In today's dynamic educational landscape, advancing your knowledge has evolved beyond the confines of traditional classroom settings. Online learning provides unparalleled flexibility, increases access, and enables diverse communities of writers from across the globe to collaborate and learn together. Experienced faculty members leverage interactive forums and the latest technology to engage the classroom. Learning in the digital space also gives students essential technical skills vital to modern writing jobs. From navigating version control across remote teams to mastering online research techniques, students in online programs develop proficiencies that are directly applicable to the ever-evolving landscape of writing and communications.

Accredited online programs maintain the same curricular rigor and employ the latest innovative technology to instruct, inspire, connect, and prepare students for the professional world. Today, many higher education institutions leverage online degrees to meet increasing demand for flexible learning options.

What master's degree do you need to be a writer?

There are lots of programs for aspiring writers. The best option for you depends on your career goals.

The best writing degree for someone who wants to work in a professional setting (marketing, public relations, medical writing, corporate communications, research, policy, technical writing) is a master's in professional writing.

Should I get a master's degree in writing?

Pursuing a master's program in writing can be a smart strategy to future-proof your career and take advantage of a growing demand for expert writers. While AI-generative technology may encroach on junior-level writing positions, the career outlook for skilled writers is strong. Master’s degree graduates will be equipped with the portfolio-proven skills to be fiercely competitive in a growing labor market for experts in writing, editing, content strategy, and communications. The most successful employers know that investing in powerhouse writing skills is essential for success. Businesses depend on professional writers to create change-making policy documents, engaging social media posts, stand-out website copy, persuasive grant writing, influential annual reports, and the list goes on and on. Our workshop-model curriculum is designed to help writers hone their skills and develop nuanced understandings of specific industries.

Take the next step

Learn more about your program of interest and apply.

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masters in digital writing

Master of Arts: Digital Storytelling

Interested get in touch.

Request for more information! 

As human beings, we storify everything around us: our adventures, sorrows, conflicts, dreams and failures. Without a solid and compelling story, even the best-designed messages struggle to engage their audiences. As a media professional, you have the ability to influence, inspire, inform and move your audiences. If you love storytelling and want to create compelling stories for digital platforms, the M.A. in Digital Storytelling is for you. 

Today’s digital storytellers and marketing professionals must be able to create engaging stories that leverage the ever-growing resources of digital technology. The old distinctions between media sectors are rapidly disappearing in today’s online world. Effective digital storytelling and marketing now requires a mastery of social media, writing, and video production and other aspects of convergent media. Through Asbury University’s digital storytelling program, you’ll learn how to use these technologies, how to create and package stories that will captivate your audiences and how to support your work with solid research and analytics.

This program is designed to help you master a wide range of media skills, from content writing to social media management to video production. Our program is almost completely online which allows our professors to help you perfect your existing skills and learn new skills that will help you succeed in the rapidly-changing job market. 

Begin your application today!

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Master of Arts in Digital Studies of Language, Culture, and History

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Department Website: http://digitalstudies.uchicago.edu

Faculty Director: David Schloen

Associate Director: Brooke Luetgert

Digital Studies Faculty Board

The University of Chicago’s program in Digital Studies of Language, Culture, and History provides a one-year Master of Arts curriculum intended for full-time students who have a bachelor’s degree in the humanities or in a related discipline such as history, anthropology, or linguistics. In addition, a  joint BA/MA  and undergraduate Minor  in Digital Studies are offered to students in the College of the University of Chicago, and a Graduate Certificate  in Digital Studies is available to graduate students in other programs of the University. The MA in Digital Studies qualifies as a STEM Designated Degree Program under the regulations of the United States Immigration and Customs Enforcement agency.

The Digital Studies program at the University of Chicago responds to the growing demand for academic rigor in the loosely defined field of digital humanities and the need to certify technical competence in this area. The program equips students of the humanities to pursue careers that utilize their skills in research, writing, and critical thinking in tandem with the use of software for the study of human languages and cultures, past and present.

The Digital Studies  faculty and staff  represent a wide range of academic fields, including linguistics, literary studies, media studies, history, philosophy, anthropology, archaeology, art history, visual arts, musicology, and religious studies. They share a common interest in understanding the impact of digital technology and in using digital tools to represent, analyze, and preserve the products of human language and culture. Collectively, their work shows how digital studies encompass the full range of human activities, from everyday speech and writing to historical documents and literary texts, and include music and art as well as mundane objects, places, and institutions.

The core courses  and electives in Digital Studies (DIGS) are designed to foster, not just technical skills in coding and data analysis, but an understanding of the history of computing and its cultural impact from the perspective of the humanities. Students in these courses are introduced to computer programming and the use of software libraries via three widely used programming languages: Python, R, and JavaScript. Learning to code in these languages is the gateway for students to understand and use cutting-edge digital tools and data standards to manage, analyze, and publish information, with emphasis on the kinds of data commonly encountered in the humanities, including texts, images, maps, and other media.

The general MA in Digital Studies entails six core courses  and three electives . While a thesis is not required for degree completion, the program also offers three specialized concentrations in which two of the electives are replaced with courses in a particular subject area and students complete a thesis project in that area. The three concentrations are the  MA in Digital Archaeology , the MA in Digital Media , and the  MA in Digital Texts . Completing the degree with specialization and thesis will be noted on the degree certificate.

Degree Requirements

The general MA in Digital Studies requires  six core courses , three elective courses . Students who do a specialized concentration in Digital Archaeology, Digital Media, or Digital Texts must take two additional required courses in their area of concentration and do a thesis in that area, and so will have only one elective course. The general MA requires the following:

  • Three core courses in the Autumn Quarter consisting of (1) an introduction to computer programming using the Python programming language; (2) basic statistics and data analysis using Python and Jupyter Notebooks; and (3) an introduction to digital humanities that surveys the the history and theory of digital computing, the various uses of computers in the humanities, and current debates concerning digital humanities. Students who have previously taken a programming course and/or a statistics course may be exempted from one or both of those requirements and take additional electives instead, subject to the approval of the Director of Digital Studies. To receive an exemption from the Autumn Quarter “Introduction to Computer Programming,” students must take a competency test to demonstrate their knowledge of programming and of Python.
  • Three core courses in the Winter and Spring Quarters on data management, data publication, and data analysis for the humanities. Students must take either “Data Analysis for the Humanities II” in the Winter or “Data Analysis for the Humanities III” in the Spring; or they may choose to take both of these data analysis courses if they use one of them as an elective.
  • Three elective courses in the Winter and Spring Quarters in any field of the humanities or social sciences. At least one of the three electives must deal with digital computing in some way, whether or not it entails actual coding.

Autumn Quarter

  • DIGS 30001 Introduction to Computer Programming with Python
  • DIGS 30002 Data Analysis I: Introduction to Statistics
  • DIGS 30007 Introduction to Digital Humanities

Winter Quarter

  • DIGS 30003 Data Management for the Humanities
  • DIGS 30004 Data Analysis II: Data Visualization and Machine Learning
  • An approved elective course (for the general MA) or   NEAA 30061 Ancient Landscapes I (for the MA in Digital Archaeology), or a  CMST course on digital media (for the MA in Digital Media) or   DIGS 30031 Digital Texts I: Corpus Building and Corpus Statistics (for the MA in Digital Texts)
  • Selection of MA thesis topic and confirmation of a thesis adviser (optional)

Spring Quarter

  • DIGS 30005 Data Publication for the Humanities
  • An approved elective course (for the general MA) or   DIGS 30021 , “Digital Archaeology” (for the MA in Digital Archaeology), or a  CMST course on digital media (for the MA in Digital Media)
  • Ongoing work on the MA thesis, due May 15 for June graduation or June 15 for August graduation (not required)

Summer Quarter

Students do not need to register for any courses in the Summer Quarter and they are not required to be in residence in the Chicago area while they complete the thesis.

The Master of Arts in Digital Studies of Language, Culture, and History program welcomes a cohort of students dedicated to exploring humanistic knowledge in the digital realm. 

Information on How to Apply

The application process for admission and financial aid for all graduate programs in the Humanities is administered through the divisional Office of the Dean of Students. The Application for Admission and Financial Aid, with instructions, deadlines and department specific information is available online at: http://humanities.uchicago.edu/students/admissions .

Questions pertaining to admissions and aid should be directed to [email protected] or (773) 702-1552.

International students must provide evidence of English proficiency by submitting scores from either the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) or the International English Language Testing System (IELTS). (Current minimum scores, etc., are provided with the application.) For more information, please see the Office of International Affairs website at https://internationalaffairs.uchicago.edu , or call them at (773) 702-7752.

Further information is available at https://digitalstudies.uchicago.edu/application

Contact Information

[email protected]

(773) 702-1552

Digital Studies Courses

DIGS 30000. Approaches to Digital Humanities Using Python. 100 Units.

This course introduces students to (1) current work in digital humanities with examples of the software applications being used and the computational research being done in literary, historical, linguistic, and cultural studies; and (2) the principles and practices of computer programming using the Python programming language. (Taught remotely via Zoom in the Summer Session; undergraduate only.)

Instructor(s): Clovis Gladstone     Terms Offered: Summer Equivalent Course(s): DIGS 10000

DIGS 30001. Introduction to Computer Programming with Python. 100 Units.

This course provides an introduction to computer programming and computational concepts using the Python programming language. Students are also introduced to the use of Visual Studio Code as an industry-standard source code editor. This course is a prerequisite for most of the other Digital Studies (DIGS) courses. Students enrolled in one of the Digital Studies programs (MA, joint BA/MA, undergraduate minor, or graduate certificate) who have previously passed an equivalent college-level course in computer programming with a grade of B (3.0) or higher may petition the Associate Director of Curriculum and Instruction of the Forum for Digital Culture for an exemption from taking this course and permission to take an additional elective course instead.

Instructor(s): Clovis Gladstone     Terms Offered: Autumn Equivalent Course(s): DIGS 20001

DIGS 30002. Data Analysis I: Introduction to Statistics. 100 Units.

This course provides an introduction to statistics and computational data analysis using Python and Jupyter Notebook. It is a prerequisite for "Data Analysis II: Data Visualization and Machine Learning" (DIGS 20004/30004) in the Winter Quarter. Topics covered include probability, distributions, and statistical inference, as well as linear regression and logistic regression. Students will gain additional practice in Python coding and will learn how to use Python libraries for statistics and plotting. The textbook for this course is OpenIntro Statistics, which is available online, free of charge. Students enrolled in one of the Digital Studies programs (MA, joint BA/MA, undergraduate minor, or graduate certificate) who have previously passed an equivalent college-level course in statistics with a grade of B (3.0) or higher may petition the Associate Director of Curriculum and Instruction of the Forum for Digital Culture for an exemption from taking this course and permission to take an additional elective course instead.

Instructor(s): Brooke Luetgert     Terms Offered: Autumn Equivalent Course(s): DIGS 20002

DIGS 30003. Data Management for the Humanities. 100 Units.

This course introduces concepts and techniques related to the representation and management of digital data with emphasis on the forms of data encountered in the humanities. Topics covered include: (1) digital text encoding using the Unicode and XML standards, with attention to the TEI-XML tagging scheme of the Text Encoding Initiative; (2) digital typefaces ("fonts") for displaying encoded characters; (3) digital encoding of 2D images, 3D models, sound, and video; (4) database models and querying languages (especially SQL for relational databases and SPARQL for non-relational RDF-graph databases), with attention to methods for integrating and querying the kinds of semi-structured and heterogeneous data characteristic of the humanities; (5) ontologies, the Semantic Web, and related technical standards; and (6) cartographic concepts (e.g., coordinate systems and map projections) and the basics of geospatial data management using Geographic Information Systems. This course has no prerequisite; i.e., prior knowledge of computer programming is not required.

Instructor(s): Miller Prosser     Terms Offered: Autumn Equivalent Course(s): DIGS 20003

DIGS 30004. Data Analysis II: Data Visualization and Machine Learning. 100 Units.

This course introduces best practices for analyzing large and complex data sets using Python and gives students a basic understanding of machine learning. Topics covered include data visualization, social network analysis, principal component analysis (PCA), and the k-nearest neighbors (KNN) algorithm. The objective is to make students familiar with these methods and aware of their potential in linguistic, cultural, and historical research.

Instructor(s): Brooke Luetgert     Terms Offered: Winter Prerequisite(s): DIGS 20001/30001, “Introduction to Computer Programming with Python” (or an equivalent course in computer programming) and DIGS 20002/30002, “Data Analysis I: Introduction to Statistics” (or an equivalent course in statistics). Equivalent Course(s): DIGS 20004

DIGS 30005. Data Publication for the Humanities. 100 Units.

This course introduces software techniques and tools for building Web browser apps written in HTML5, CSS, and JavaScript with emphasis on user interfaces for presenting information to researchers and students in the humanities. Students will take an active role in evaluating approaches and outcomes of existing digital publications. Topics covered include: (1) the use of application programming interfaces (APIs) to integrate into Web apps the various analysis, visualization, and database services provided by external systems; (2) the transformation of data into formats appropriate for publication on the Web; and (3) the nature of data in the humanities as pertains to digital publication.

Instructor(s): Miller Prosser     Terms Offered: Spring Prerequisite(s): DIGS 20001/30001, “Introduction to Computer Programming with Python” (or an equivalent course in computer programming). Equivalent Course(s): DIGS 20005

DIGS 30006. Artificial Intelligence and the Humanities. 100 Units.

In this course we will look at artificial intelligence (AI) from the perspective of the humanities both to assess the impact of AI on the creation and study of cultural materials and to question its presuppositions. The first part of the course will survey the history of the attempts made over the years to create AI using computational methods and the philosophical critiques of those attempts. Attention will be paid both to symbolic AI that employs explicit digital representations of human knowledge and reasoning and the quite different paradigm of connectionist AI that employs neural networks and predictive models. In the latter part of the course, we will discuss the recent development of "generative AI" systems (e.g., ChatGPT) that use large "foundation models" to create remarkably human-like text and images and we will experiment with these systems via hands-on exercises. We will consider the benefits and drawbacks of such tools for research in the humanities and discuss their social and cultural impact more generally.

Instructor(s): Jeffrey Tharsen     Terms Offered: Spring Equivalent Course(s): DIGS 20006

DIGS 30007. Introduction to Digital Humanities. 100 Units.

This course surveys (1) the history and theory of digital computing, (2) the ways computers have been used in the humanities, (3) recent theoretical debates surrounding the contested concept of "digital humanities," (4) the philosophical issues raised by digital knowledge representation and artificial intelligence, and (5) the ethical and public policy issues raised by the pervasive use of digital technology in present-day societies.

Instructor(s): David Schloen     Terms Offered: Winter Prerequisite(s): DIGS 20001/30001, “Introduction to Computer Programming with Python” (or an equivalent course in computer programming) and DIGS 20003/30003, “Data Management for the Humanities.” These prerequisites may be waived in some cases with the instructor’s consent. Equivalent Course(s): DIGS 20007

DIGS 30008. Thesis Preparation. 000 Units.

This course is intended for students in the two-year version of the Digital Studies MA program, who will normally enroll in it in the Spring Quarter of their second year, when they are completing their MA thesis projects.

Instructor(s): n/a     Terms Offered: Spring

DIGS 30021. Digital Archaeology. 100 Units.

This course introduces students to a variety of computational methods used in archaeology and art history for the digital representation and analysis of cultural sites, buildings, landscapes, and artifacts. Relevant concepts and techniques are taught by means of both explanatory lectures and hands-on exercises. Software tools used in the course include ArcGIS and QGIS for geospatial data and map-creation; Agisoft Metashape for photogrammetry and 3D modeling; OCHRE for integrated multimedia data management; and Python software libraries for image analysis, feature recognition, and statistics. Gamification and the use of augmented reality and virtual reality in archaeology are discussed briefly; these topics are covered in detail in DIGS 20041/30041, "Digital Media I: Game Design with Unity," and DIGS 20042/30042, "Digital Media II: Extended Reality with Unity."

Instructor(s): David Schloen     Terms Offered: Spring Prerequisite(s): DIGS 20001/30001, “Introduction to Computer Programming with Python” (or an equivalent course in computer programming), DIGS 20002/30002, “Data Analysis I: Introduction to Statistics” (or an equivalent course in statistics), and DIGS 20003/30003, “Data Management for the Humanities.” These prerequisites may be waived in some cases with the instructor’s consent. Equivalent Course(s): DIGS 20021

DIGS 30031. Digital Texts I: Corpus Building and Corpus Statistics. 100 Units.

The purpose of this course is to introduce students in the humanities to digital methodologies for the study of texts. Students will not only learn how to construct a digital text collection but also how to process text as data. Among the various digital approaches which will be introduced in class are concordances (retrieving occurrences of words), semantic similarity detection (finding similar passages across texts), sentiment analysis, and stylometry (analysis of literary style). The course will highlight how these approaches to text can provide new avenues of research, such as tracing intellectual influence over the longue durée, or uncovering the distinguishing stylistic features of an author, work, or literary movement. Students need no prior knowledge of such methods, and the course will aim at providing both the basics of computer programming in Python and giving students the necessary tools to conduct a digital humanities project. The source material for the course will be drawn from literary sources, and students will be free (and encouraged) to use texts which are relevant to their own research interests. Students will need to bring a laptop to class.

Instructor(s): Clovis Gladstone     Terms Offered: Winter Equivalent Course(s): RLLT 34550, RLLT 24550, DIGS 20031

DIGS 30032. Digital Texts II: Natural Language Processing and Deep Learning. 100 Units.

This course builds on DIGS 20031/30031, "Digital Texts I: Corpus Building and Corpus Statistics," by introducing students to advanced computational methods for studying texts, including deep learning (AI), with emphasis on the needs of research in the humanities. Students will evaluate these methods and gain practical experience in applying them. Prerequisites: DIGS 20001/30001, "Introduction to Computer Programming with Python," DIGS 20004/30004, "Data Analysis II: Data Visualization and Machine Learning," and DIGS 20031/30031, "Digital Texts I: Corpus Building and Corpus Statistics," or equivalent prior preparation.

Instructor(s): Jeffrey Tharsen     Terms Offered: Spring Prerequisite(s): DIGS 20001/30001, “Introduction to Computer Programming with Python,” DIGS 20003/30003, “Data Management for the Humanities,” DIGS 20004/30004, “Data Analysis II: Data Visualization and Machine Learning,” and DIGS 20031/30031, “Digital Texts I: Corpus Building and Corpus Statistics.” Note(s): Prerequisites may be waived by permission of the instructor for students who have sufficient background in the subject. Equivalent Course(s): DIGS 20032

DIGS 30035. Introduction to Cultural Analytics. 100 Units.

This course introduces students to the emerging field of cultural analytics - a field that sits at the intersection of cultural studies, information science, and the computational social sciences. At root, the field is oriented around questions of how to study the cultural past and present (whether text, image, or sound) with the aid of data-driven methods, and what such methods imply for our understanding of human culture. The course will begin with a look at how past scholars wrestled with the problem of applying numbers to cultural objects, and some of their initial attempts to do so. We then move to survey the wide variety of scholarship happening today under the influence of new digital technologies and vast new information infrastructures. How have scholars across different humanistic fields adopted new computational tools? What methodological and theoretical problems has this raised? What new discoveries has it yielded? Finally, the course will consider new research directions opened up by recent advances in artificial intelligence and the increasing convergence of cultural production with online platforms that are global in reach (e.g., TikTok, Wattpad, Netflix, Spotify). Students will engage with these questions through primary readings, attempts to replicate past studies, and by designing their own research proposals.

Instructor(s): Long, Hoyt      Terms Offered: Spring Note(s): Some programming experience preferred, but not required

DIGS 30041. Digital Media I: Game Design with Unity. 100 Units.

Part one of a two-course sequence, this making-oriented course provides an introduction to the principles, practices, and techniques of game design. Students will develop several small games, gaining hands-on experience with C# and the Unity development platform. The course takes a "ground up" approach: starting with the fundamentals of object- and component-oriented programming, then using those fundamentals to build complex, interactive experiences. While the course focuses on Unity, an introduction to software design patterns and an emphasis on a rapid feedback/iteration cycle will provide tools that translate to other game engines and creative computing projects. Through critique and the close examination of case studies from prior art, students will cultivate their critical eye and articulation, equipping them to discuss, assess, and refine games at various stages of development.

Instructor(s): Cameron Mankin     Terms Offered: Winter Prerequisite(s): DIGS 20001/30001, “Introduction to Computer Programming with Python” (or an equivalent course in computer programming). Note(s): Undergraduate MAAD students attempting to join the course should fill out this form to join a shortlist: https://airtable.com/appF7rAlnH3zoRdB4/shrfuB9cVwZC1b5hc. ONLY undergraduates who fill out the form will be considered for the course. Please do NOT send consent requests before filling out the form. Equivalent Course(s): MAAD 20041

DIGS 30042. Digital Media II: Extended Reality with Unity. 100 Units.

Part-two of a two-course sequence, this course teaches students how to develop extended reality (XR) environments using the Unity platform. The course emphasizes the creation of augmented reality (AR) and virtual reality (VR) environments, allowing students to gain hands-on experience. Additionally, students will discuss development with their instructor and peers, assisting them in refining their skills and ideas while creating. By the end of the quarter, students will clearly understand the process of transforming ideas into final products, equipping them with the necessary tools for future XR endeavors.

Instructor(s): Crystal Beiersdorfer     Terms Offered: Spring Prerequisite(s): DIGS 30041/MAAD 20041, “Digital Media I: Game Design with Unity” (or an equivalent Unity course approved by the instructor). Equivalent Course(s): MAAD 20042

DIGS 49900. Reading and Research. 100 Units.

Reading and Research

Instructor(s): David Schloen     Terms Offered: Spring

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masters in digital writing

Master of Arts in Digital Media (MA)

Program at a glance.

masters in digital writing

  • In State Tuition
  • Out of State Tuition

Learn more about the cost to attend UCF.

U.S. News & World Report Best Colleges - Most Innovative 2024

Capture Stories Through Digital Expression

The M.A. program in Digital Media covers theoretical frameworks, methods and critical media practice related to computational, interactive media. Through rigorous creative and research projects, the program will prepare you for continued study in a Ph.D. program or employment within the industry. Working closely with our innovative faculty and technology partnerships in downtown Orlando, you’ll have the opportunity to employ emerging technologies to communicate interactive narratives and experiences, while also producing cutting-edge research in interactive media.

In the first year of your studies, gain an introduction to aesthetic, theoretical, programming and design approaches to interactive media, while gaining valuable foundations in research and storytelling. Then in the second year, you can either pursue a thesis or creative studio production path, while learning about contemporary topics and emerging Artificial Intelligence (AI) research and design. Throughout the program, you’re encouraged to create portfolio-ready pieces and/or present their work at conferences, thus preparing them for future professional, artistic, and scholarly success at the forefront of interactive media.

The Digital Media M.A. combines theory and practice to train the next generation of interactive media scholars and practitioners. The program emphasizes the tools and techniques of both interactive aesthetics and computation, and provides you with access to state-of-the-art facilities through the Maker Space lab, equipped with items such as 3D printers, scanning computers, eye-tracking equipment for games research, mixed-reality smartglasses, and laser cutters, among many others. Here, you’ll have unique opportunities to participate in socially impactful research and artistic production.

Hand using pen on digital screen

Application Deadlines

Ready to get started, course overview, programming for digital media.

This course provides a foundation for understanding and applying the elements of programming which target interactive media. Topics include functions, variables, classes, data types, and design patterns.

Media Aesthetics

Aesthetics within digital environments, relationship between technologies, visual elements, and the body. Introduction to theoretical traditions along with written and digital projects, including an exhibition.

Theory and Practice of Interactive Storytelling

Analysis and creation of interactive stories within and across platforms. What makes stories compelling, how to exploit the particular affordances of media through authors communicate.

Design for Interactive Media

This studio course gives students tangible experience with the design principles, methodologies, and processes used for interactive media.

Digital Media Skills You'll Learn

  • Develop theoretically sophisticated creative works, and to pair creativity with research. This is accomplished through providing students with a solid foundation in aesthetic, design, programming and theoretical approaches.
  • Design compelling experiences specifically for interactive media: including prototyping and integration of traditional 2D, 3D, and time-based methods with interactive media.
  • Gain the foundational skills and knowledge needed for students to create exhibition- or publication-ready projects.
  • Learn about programming for interactive media: including foundational elements of programming and machine learning.
  • Storytelling and aesthetics for interactive media: including analyzing and creating interactive stories within and across multiple platforms, and developing an understanding of the relationship between technologies, visual elements, and the body’s sensual engagement with those forms

Career Opportunities

  • Applications Developer
  • Back-End Web Developer
  • Front-End Web Developer
  • Full Stack Web Developer
  • Project Manager
  • Social Media Manager
  • Web Interface Designer
  • Game Designer and Developer
  • AR and VR Designer and Developer
  • Teaching (K-12, college, university)

Admission Requirements

The digital media master’s degree at UCF accepts applications throughout the year; however, the program only admits for the fall semester. Desirable background skills for this degree include familiarity with computer coding and/or digital design, but these are not required as coursework addresses these areas. You must apply online and submit all requested materials by the established deadline.

Please note that meeting minimum UCF admission criteria does not guarantee program admission. Final admission is based on evaluation of the applicant’s abilities, past performance, recommendations, match of this program and faculty expertise to the applicant’s career/academic goals, the applicant’s potential for completing the degree, and the current applicant pool.

To apply, submit the general graduate admissions requirements , as well as the following items by the deadline:

  • One official transcript (in a sealed envelope) from each college/university attended.
  • A written statement (1 – 2 pages) describing the student’s personal goals, objectives, and research interests in seeking the degree.
  • Three letters of recommendation from former professors or employers who can address applicant’s ability to undertake graduate-level courses.
  • For students intending to pursue the studio track, a link to a web portfolio of 2 – 5 substantial creative and/or technical works. For students intending to pursue the thesis track, writing sample(s) totaling 10 – 15 pages.

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University of Central Florida Colleges

masters in digital writing

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Enter your information below to receive more information about the Digital Media (MA) program offered at UCF.

The MA program in Digital Media engages students in theoretical frameworks, methods, and critical media practice related to computational, interactive media. Through rigorous creative and research projects, the MA prepares students for continued study in a PhD program or employment within the industry. Working closely with an innovative faculty and technology partnerships in downtown Orlando, students will employ emerging technologies to communicate interactive narratives and experiences while also producing cutting-edge research in interactive media.

The Digital Media MA combines theory and practice to train the next generation of interactive media scholars and practitioners. Part of the first wave of UCF's state-of-the-art downtown campus, students in this program have unique opportunities to participate in socially impactful research and artistic production. In the first year, students gain an introduction to aesthetic, theoretical, programming, and design approaches to interactive media, while gaining valuable foundations in research and storytelling. In the second year, students either pursue a thesis or studio production path, while learning about contemporary topics and emerging Artificial Intelligence (AI) research and design. Throughout the program, students are encouraged to create portfolio-ready pieces and/or present their work at conferences, thus preparing them for future professional, artistic, and scholarly success at the forefront of interactive media.

The program focuses on the following areas:

  • Theory and Practice : The program trains students to pair theory and practice regardless of the path they choose through the program. Students will learn to develop theoretically sophisticated creative works and to pair creativity with research. This is accomplished by providing students with a solid foundation in aesthetic, design, programming, and theoretical approaches.
  • Narrative and Experience Design : The program also emphasizes interactive storytelling and an understanding of how to design compelling experiences specifically for interactive media. This is accomplished through coursework on these subjects, and the time allotted in the program's plan of study for students to develop in-depth creative and research projects that put the concepts learned in coursework into play.
  • Social Impact : The MA in Digital Media also takes advantage of the creative, research, and business opportunities available through the program's downtown Orlando location to provide students with a range of real-world, socially impactful research and creative experiences. Course projects and students' own creative and research work benefit from the social, cultural, and economic context of a thriving downtown sector.
  • Professional and Scholarly Outcomes : The MA program offers two equally in-depth and rigorous tracks—the Thesis or Studio Production paths. The required coursework provides the foundational skills and knowledge needed for students to create an exhibition or publication-ready projects.

Total Credit Hours Required: 36 Credit Hours Minimum beyond the Bachelor's Degree

Program Prerequisites

Desirable background skills for this degree include familiarity with computer coding and/or digital design, but these are not required as coursework addresses these areas.

Degree Requirements

Required courses.

  • DIG5487 - Media Aesthetics (3)
  • DIG5508 - Programming for Digital Media (3)
  • DIG5831 - Computational Media (3)
  • DIG6136 - Design for Interactive Media (3)
  • DIG6551 - Theory and Practice of Interactive Storytelling (3)
  • DIG6647 - History and Theory of Dynamic Media (3)
  • DIG6817 - Contemporary Topics in Interactive Media (3)

Thesis/Non-Thesis Option

  • Students choosing the Thesis option will take all required courses, along with two electives (one in Fall and one in Spring of their second year in a typical program of study). The electives may come from any COM, DIG, or FIL prefix or other as approved by the graduate coordinator. Many graduate-level courses in the College of Arts and Humanities can be used as electives, based on an adviser-approved plan of study. These courses must be selected to ensure that at least one-half of the courses in the student's plan of study are taken at the 6000 level. In addition, students will take 6 hours of DIG 6971: Thesis credit (3 in Fall and 3 in Spring in a typical program of study). Each candidate for the Master of Arts submits a thesis prospectus and preliminary bibliography on a topic selected in consultation with the adviser. The formal thesis is initiated by the preparation of a proposal that meets both departmental and university requirements for the thesis. Prior to enrollment into thesis credit hours, the adviser, in consultation with the student, designates a Thesis Committee to be further approved by the College Graduate of Studies. This committee is chaired by the adviser and includes two or more additional faculty members from the Nicholson School of Communication and Media. The members of the student's thesis committee judge the proposal as the preliminary step to beginning the thesis. This committee must approve the Thesis Proposal before academic credit can accrue. The thesis is a formal written document. The introduction cites similar, related, and antecedent work. The body explains the purposes of the project, the method of its production, and any evaluation that was performed. The conclusion includes plans for future work. The thesis also includes an archival copy of the resulting creative product. Both the thesis and the creative product must be delivered in digital form, acceptable by the UCF library according to its standards for digital dissertations and theses.
  • DIG6971 - Thesis (1 - 99)
  • Earn at least 6 credits from the following types of courses: Electives
  • In addition to a written thesis, the final step in completing the thesis requirement is an oral defense before the thesis committee. Candidates must present their creative or research work and explain its creation in an oral defense. These presentations are made to the student's committee in a public meeting that other faculty and students may attend.
  • Students selecting the Studio Production option complete 6 required credit hours: DIG 6571: Studio 1 (3 credit hours) and DIG 6909: Research Report (3 credit hours), and an additional 6 credit hours of electives. The electives may come from any COM, DIG, or FIL prefix or other as approved by the graduate coordinator. Many graduate-level courses in the College of Arts and Humanities can be used as electives, based on an adviser-approved plan of study. These courses must be selected to ensure that at least one-half of the courses in the student's plan of study are taken at the 6000 level.
  • DIG6524 - Studio 1 (3)
  • Earn at least 3 credits from the following types of courses: DIG 6909 - Research Report

Grand Total Credits: 36

Application requirements, financial information.

Graduate students may receive financial assistance through fellowships, assistantships, tuition support, or loans. For more information, see the College of Graduate Studies Funding website, which describes the types of financial assistance available at UCF and provides general guidance in planning your graduate finances. The Financial Information section of the Graduate Catalog is another key resource.

Fellowship Information

Fellowships are awarded based on academic merit to highly qualified students. They are paid to students through the Office of Student Financial Assistance, based on instructions provided by the College of Graduate Studies. Fellowships are given to support a student's graduate study and do not have a work obligation. For more information, see UCF Graduate Fellowships, which includes descriptions of university fellowships and what you should do to be considered for a fellowship.

2024 Best Online Masters in Creative Writing Programs

If you love writing and want to advance your skills in this sector, you might consider pursuing a masters in creative writing.

Best Online Masters in Creative Writing Programs

Students in these programs have often received a bachelors in a related subject or already have a career where they write on a regular basis. A masters program may help you get to the next level in your career or study a subject specific to your interests.

Editorial Listing ShortCode:

Professionals with a creative writing graduate degree may work in public relations, education, journalism, publishing, technical writing, and more.

Online Masters in Creative Writing Programs

masters of creative writing online

An online creative writing masters program can teach you how to develop your writing skills in a variety of ways. These online professional writing degree programs often challenge students to step outside their comfort zone and explore new avenues of writing, such as poetry, different genres, or screenwriting.

Many masters programs give students the option to choose a concentration, which could help you learn subjects specific to a career you wish to pursue. Examples of concentrations include nonfiction, poetry, and editing.

While enrolled in a masters in creative writing program, you may study some of the following topics:

  • Screenwriting
  • Copyediting
  • Fact-checking
  • Narrative theories
  • Science fiction writing
  • Storytelling
  • Character development
  • Plot development
  • Short stories
  • Personal essays

Not only do creative writing degrees teach you to improve your own writing, but they often show you how to critique your peers’ work. This helps enhance your editing skills and gives you an idea of what areas you can work on.

Graduates may pursue a variety of careers that involve writing in a wide range of industries. For instance, they may work toward roles as writers, authors, technical writers, and editors in media, marketing, tech, and other sectors.

Creative writing masters programs may help professionals advance to the next level in their careers by developing their skills and giving them a credential to add to their resume. A graduate degree may also help professionals switch to an area of writing they’re more interested in.

Common Online Masters in Creative Writing Concentrations

Editors with Online Master in Creative Writing degree

Many graduate programs in creative writing will give you the opportunity to choose a concentration. Here are some common specializations you may come across:

  • Fiction. This concentration covers elements of a narrative, such as plot and character building, and may help prepare students to pursue careers as authors.
  • Poetry. You’ll learn the art of poetry and how to create inspiring imagery through your words.
  • Editing. This concentration helps prepare students for careers as editors, and it also teaches them to edit their own work.
  • Screenwriting. You’ll learn how to develop characters and plot through visual storytelling and screenwriting.
  • Publishing. This concentration will teach you how to prepare a story to be edited and mass produced.

A concentration may help prepare you to further your career or switch into an area of writing you’re most interested in. While you’ll most likely still take general creative writing classes, you may spend a good portion of your masters program focused on your specialization.

Creative Writing Careers and Salaries

Creative Writing Careers and Salaries

Most graduates with a masters degree in creative writing pursue careers where they can put their writing skills to good use.

Some graduates go on to become a writer or authors, where they may write books, copy, scripts, or other formats. Professionals may also choose to work in the public relations or marketing arena, as these roles often require excellent writing skills.

According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics , here are the median salaries of careers associated with creative writing.

Since a creative writing graduate program builds on your writing, research, and communication skills, pursuing any career where you can spend a lot of time writing may be strategic. Professionals may also work as technical writers, journalists, or editors.

While careers in writing do not typically require an advanced degree, holding a masters might help give graduates a leg up when applying for jobs. Some management roles and postsecondary teaching roles, though, may require the minimum of a masters-level education. A masters program can also help you hone your skills in a particular sector of creative writing.

Creative Writing Master’s Curriculum & Courses

students pursuing Creative Writing Master's in a group work

The curriculum in creative writing master’s programs can vary, but here are a few courses you may end up taking:

  • Studying the Craft: You’ll read a variety of respected literature to learn essential components of creative writing.
  • Narrative Theory and Poetics: This course covers the different elements that make up fiction writing and poetry.
  • Screenwriting Fundamentals: You’ll learn all the components that are needed for screenwriting, including plot, scene, and dialogue.
  • Writing About Popular Music: This class studies writings about music over the past century and what they tell us about popular culture.
  • Non-Fiction Fundamentals: You’ll learn how to write various forms of non-fiction work, including memoirs, essays, and journalism.
  • The Editor: This course covers different types of editing, including copy editing and proofreading, and shows students how to critically examine others’ writings.
  • Ten Problems for the Fiction Writer: You’ll learn the most common challenges that arise for fiction writers and how to address them.
  • Studies in Place and Setting: This class looks at the role a setting can have in a narrative, and it teaches students how to create a memorable one.
  • Rewriting America Since the 1960s: You’ll learn about how modern American fiction writers deliver work that the ever-changing public wants to read.
  • Genres: Fantasy, Sci-Fi, and Other Popular Fiction: This course allows you to learn more about a specific genre by writing in that genre and having your work reviewed by your peers.

In addition to classes like these, you may get the chance to participate in research, specialization courses, and seminars.

MFA Online in Creative Writing Admissions Requirements

Woman preparing for MFA Online in Creative Writing requirements

The admissions requirements for a masters degree in creative writing can vary depending on the school and program, but here are a few common ones you may come across:

  • Bachelors degree
  • Undergraduate transcripts
  • Personal statement
  • GRE test results (only some schools require them)
  • Writing sample

In place of a singular writing sample, some schools may want potential students to submit an entire portfolio of their writing work. Some programs also have a minimum bachelors GPA requirement, which they may verify through your undergraduate transcripts.

Master in Creative Writing Programs Accreditation

University offering Master in Creative Writing Programs

Before choosing a school for your master degree in creative writing, it’s strategic to check if your prospective schools have regional accreditation.

When a school is regionally accredited, it has met a series of academic quality standards. Not only is regional accreditation important if you’re looking to apply for federal financial aid, but employers may also want to see that you’ve attended an accredited school.

To learn more about regional accreditation, you can visit the US Department of Education ‘s website.

Creative Writing Licensure and Certifications

Writers with American Copy Editors Society Certificate in Editing

Here are a few common industry certifications that you may choose to pursue to demonstrate your skill sets and proficiency in the field:

  • American Writers & Artists Inc. Copywriting Certifications: This organization has different options for copywriting certifications, including grant writing and resume writing.
  • American Copy Editors Society Certificate in Editing: This certification covers fact-checking and other aspects of editing.
  • American Medical Writers Association Medical Writer Certified: This organization offers a program and exam for professionals in the medical communications field.

In addition to providing the exam that professionals take to become certified, organizations like these often offer training programs.

Financial Aid and Scholarships

Master in Creative Writing Programs Financial Aid

If you’re interested in financial aid, you can explore the variety of options available for qualifying students on the Federal Student Aid website. Prospective graduate students may be able to apply for student loans, scholarships, and more.

Graduate students may choose to look into direct unsubsidized loans, which don’t require students to demonstrate financial need. With these loans, your school determines how much money you can borrow. Scholarships are often available through schools as well as outside organizations.

Graduate students who already have established careers may seek tuition benefits from their employer. Some employers offer tuition reimbursement or professional development programs for workers who want to further their education.

What Can You Do with a Masters in Creative Writing?

Postsecondary English & Literature Teacher discussing with students

Professionals who have graduated from masters programs in creative writing typically work in a job that allows them to put their advanced-level writing skills to good use. Common careers include writer, author, technical writer, journalist, and editor.

Public relations, fundraising, and marketing are also fields that need writers who know how to effectively tell a story. Jobs in this arena include public relations specialist, promotions manager, and fundraising manager. Graduates may also use this masters degree to advance their career as a writing, communications, or literature teacher. They may pursue roles as community college professors in this area.

How Long Is an Online Creative Writing Masters Program?

student attending Online Creative Writing Masters Program

The timeframe for completing an online creative writing masters program varies, but you can get a good sense of how long yours will take if you know your enrollment status, thesis requirement, and amount of credit hours.

In general, if you attend a 36 credit hour program full-time and take classes during the summer, you may be able to graduate in as little as 1 year. This timeframe assumes your program does not have a thesis requirement. If your program does have a thesis, if you attend part-time, or if you take summers off from school, you may take longer to graduate.

What’s the Difference Between Technical Writing vs. Creative Writing Masters Programs?

Creative Writers specializing in Screenwriting

While online technical writing and creative writing masters programs cover many of the same skills, there are a few key differences between the two disciplines.

A masters in technical writing may cover:

  • Informative writing
  • Communicating facts and data

While a masters in creative writing may cover:

  • Entertaining writing
  • Imaginative content

Both degrees teach advanced-level writing, but technical writing focuses more on fact-based writing with an informative tone. Creative writing seeks primarily to entertain, persuade, and inspire.

What’s the Difference Between MA vs. MFA in Creative Writing Programs?

People completing their MFA in Creative Writing Programs

Master of Arts and Master of Fine Arts programs in creative writing have a lot of overlap, but they are different in a few ways, including the following.

An MA in Creative Writing program may:

  • Study sentence structure
  • Analyze literature

An MFA in Creative Writing program may:

  • Focus on writing as a craft
  • Teach students to become professional writers

MA programs are typically shorter than MFA programs and cover literature in addition to creative writing. MFA programs may teach practical skills needed to become a professional in the field, like freelancing and developing a social media presence.

Is a Masters in Creative Writing Worth It?

Public Relations Manager working together with writers

Yes, a masters in creative writing is worth it for many students. The Bureau of Labor Statistics projects that several careers aligned with creative writing, including public relations specialists and marketing managers, will grow faster than average over the next ten years.

Overall employment for media and communications occupations is expected to grow by 6% over this same period, which is steady, average growth. A masters degree in writing may help you advance in your current career or switch to your preferred writing field.

Universities Offering Online Masters in Creative Writing Degree Programs

Methodology: The following school list is in alphabetical order. To be included, a college or university must be regionally accredited and offer degree programs online or in a hybrid format.

Arcadia University

Arcadia University offers an MFA in Creative Writing program primarily online but with required 1 week residencies, including one abroad in Scotland. Online courses are typically taught in an asynchronous format. The program may be completed in 2 years, and the defense of a thesis is required.

Arcadia University is accredited by the Middle States Commission on Higher Education.

Antioch University

Antioch University offers an MFA in Creative Writing program in a hybrid format. The program consists of 10 day residencies followed by 5 month semester projects completed from home. The program requires a field of study, under a specific genre, such as fiction, poetry, creative nonfiction, screenwriting, or playwriting. There is also an optional professional development semester.

Antioch University is accredited by the Higher Learning Commission.

Bay Path University

Bay Path University offers an MFA in Creative Nonfiction Writing program online but with synchronous class meetings. Potential focus areas include Publishing, Narrative Medicine, and Teaching. Courses tend to follow a semester schedule, and there are commonly start dates in the fall, spring, and summer. The completion of a capstone project is required.

Bay Path University is accredited by the New England Commission of Higher Education.

Central Washington University

Central Washington University offers an MA in Professional and Creative Writing program online or on campus. New admissions typically occur during the fall cohort. Courses tend to be 10 weeks long. A course of study may be custom designed according to interests and is typically completed in 4 quarters.

Central Washington University is accredited by the Northwest Commission on Colleges and Universities.

East Stroudsburg University

East Stroudsburg University offers an MA in Professional and Digital Media Writing program online with a blend of synchronous and asynchronous courses. The program requires the completion of 30 credit hours, and courses tend to follow a traditional semester schedule.

ESU is accredited by the Commission on Higher Education of the Middle States Association of Colleges and Schools.

Eastern Kentucky University

Eastern Kentucky University offers an MFA in Creative Writing primarily online, but typically with a residency in Kentucky or abroad in Portugal. Emphases include Literary Fiction, Creative Nonfiction, and Poetry. A portfolio of work in the preferred creative genre is required to apply. The program offers an accelerated pathway, in which a bachelor’s and master’s may be earned together.

Eastern Kentucky University is accredited by the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Commission on Colleges.

Fairfield University

Fairfield University offers an MFA in Creative Writing program online but with 9 day residencies required over the course of the program. Courses may be chosen according to interest and writing style or as an emphasis like Spiritual Writing. A 12 credit certificate may be earned first and then potentially later applied toward an MFA.

Fairfield University is accredited by the New England Commission of Higher Education.

Fairleigh Dickinson University

Fairleigh Dickinson University offers an MA in Creative Writing and Literature for Educators program online but with a required 3 day residency in late June. Courses in the fall and spring tend to follow a semester schedule, and summer courses are often taught in 2 shorter sessions.

Fairleigh Dickinson University is accredited by the Middle States Commission on Higher Education.

Liberty University

Liberty University offers an MFA in Creative Writing program entirely online with no residency requirements. The completion of 48 credit hours is required, and up to half of the required credits may be transferred in. Classes tend to be 8 weeks long, and there are commonly several start dates throughout the year.

Liberty University is accredited by the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Commission on Colleges.

Lindenwood University

LIndenwood University offers an MFA in Writing program online or in a hybrid format. The completion of 48 credit hours is required, including a thesis. Courses tend to be 8 weeks long, and there are usually 5 start dates each year. Harvard University ranked Lindenwood University as the 2nd best college for an MFA in Creative Writing.

Lindenwood University is accredited by the Higher Learning Commission.

Mississippi University for Women

Mississippi University for Women offers an MFA in Creative Writing program online but with 4 required residencies. Potential classes include Fiction, Poetry, Nonfiction, Playwriting, Translation, New Media, and Literature. The program requires 48 credit hours. Tuition is typically charged at the same rate regardless of residency.

Mississippi University for Women is accredited by the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Commission on Colleges.

National University

National University offers an MFA in Creative Writing program fully online with no residency requirements. Participation in online workshops is expected. Potential courses include Writing for Young Adults and Pedagogy of Creative Writing. The completion of a manuscript focusing on genres like creative nonfiction and screenwriting is required. Several writing styles may be studied in the program.

National University is accredited by the WASC Senior College and University Commission.

Oregon State University

Oregon State University offers an online program for an MFA in Creative Writing. Attendance at weekly virtual classes is required and 4 residencies must also be attended. Best College Reviews named Oregon State University the 4th best college in the country for an MFA in Creative Writing.

Oregon State University is accredited by the Northwest Commission on Colleges and Universities.

Saint Leo University

Saint Leo University offers an MFA in Creative Writing program online but with 3 required summer residencies, each lasting 1 week. The program typically offers concentrations in Fiction, Poetry, and Nonfiction. The program requires the completion of 36 credit hours and the writing of a book-length thesis.

Saint Leo University is accredited by the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Commission on Colleges.

University of Arkansas Monticello

The University of Arkansas–Monticello offers an MFA in Creative Writing program online. Concentrations include Literary Fiction, Creative Nonfiction, or Poetry. The completion of 36 credit hours is required and up to 9 credits may be transferred in. A few graduate assistantships may be awarded to teach online sections of freshman-level writing courses.

UAM is accredited by the Higher Learning Commission.

University of Houston Victoria

The University of Houston–Victoria offers an MFA in Creative Writing program online with an optional concentration in Applied Literary Transition. The option to attend short, on-campus residencies is offered. The completion of 36 credit hours of courses and a thesis are required. Courses tend to follow a semester schedule and may include synchronous and asynchronous components.

UHV is accredited by the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Commission on Colleges.

University of New Orleans

The University of New Orleans offers an online program for an MFA in Creative Writing. Optional summer residencies are often offered. Tracks include Fiction, Creative Nonfiction, and Poetry. The completion of 45 credit hours is required. Best College Reviews ranked the University of New Orleans as the best school in the nation for an online MFA.

The University of New Orleans is accredited by the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Commission on Colleges.

University of Texas El Paso

The University of Texas–El Paso offers an MFA in Creative Writing program online with optional summer residencies commonly offered in Europe. Potential courses include Narrative Theory and Poetics. The completion of 48 credit hours is required, including 6 credits in a thesis program. Courses tend to follow a semester schedule.

The University of Texas at El Paso is accredited by the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Commission on Colleges.

Western Connecticut State University

Western Connecticut State University offers an MFA in Creative Writing. Coursework is usually completed online, but 4 short residencies over the course of the program are commonly required. The completion of 14 courses is required, and a thesis must be submitted during the final semester.

Western Connecticut State University is accredited by the New England Commission of Higher Education.

Wilkes University

Wilkes University offers an online program for an MA or MFA in Creative Writing. Attendance of weekend residencies before each term is required. Potential courses include Writing in Education and Publishing, Writing Poetry, and Genre and Context. Thesis projects are often reviewed by industry professionals. Best Colleges ranked Wilkes University as the 3rd best college for an online MFA in Creative Writing.

Wilkes University  is accredited by the Middle States Association of Colleges and Schools.

Getting Your Master’s Degree in Creative Writing Online

student pursuing Master's Degree in Creative Writing Online

If you want to advance your writing skillset, you may enjoy pursuing a masters degree in creative writing online.

If you already have an established career, an online English degree program with a focus in writing may allow additional flexibility in your schedule. Professionals with a masters degree in creative writing may pursue careers as writers, authors, editors, and more. They may also work toward college-level teaching jobs or careers in the public relations and marketing sector.

To get started on your journey toward a masters in creative writing, you could explore accredited universities and see which online creative writing degree programs and concentrations best match your schedule, interests, and aspirations.

masters in digital writing

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Reporting the World

Take the next step in your career with an online master’s degree in journalism from NYU

Start My Application

We are now accepting applications for Fall 2024. Final deadline: July 1.

We’re here to train journalists who want to change the world for the better. Whether you’re just starting out or want to get to the next level , we have what you need .

American Journalism Online Master’s Program

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American Journalism Online Awards

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The American Journalism Online Master’s Program

Do it your way

Earn a world-class Master of Arts in Journalism degree fully online. Our program brings together students from all over the globe to learn from some of the world’s most accomplished journalists. We offer flexible pathways so you can customize your course of study and complete your degree at your own pace. Go full-time and get it done in one year or attend part-time and take 18 months, two years, or longer.

Learn by doing

In the American Journalism Online Master’s Program, you’ll start reporting from day one. Our courses provide you with the foundational tools to build your career as you imagine it: you’ll choose your own beat and report on the stories that matter to you. Amass clips, shoot and edit video, record podcasts, and gain professional cred. Be the kind of journalist you want to be: a beat reporter, magazine feature writer, arts or cultural critic, audio storyteller, multimedia journalist, on-air correspondent or news anchor.

Meet your mentor

In addition to your coursework, you’ll be paired with a top professional who provides feedback on your work and advice on navigating the inner workings of the journalism industry. Our mentors are some of the best journalists in the business, and we match them with students based on their beat and mutual interests. Our mentors work at the New Yorker , the New York Times , CNN, the Guardian , the Wall Street Journal , Wired , the Washington Post , Slate, NBC, CNBC, Business Insider , Forbes , Huffington Post, BuzzFeed, Bloomberg, Gizmodo, and many others.

Internships, jobs and career counseling

Our career counselor is with you every step of the way as you seek internships and look for jobs wherever you may live. You’ll receive personal attention customized to your needs and abilities, and can tap NYU Journalism’s vast network of alumni who can help you shape your career.

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Credit: Bob Eckstein

The AJO Awards recognize excellence in reporting, writing and news production across genres. As the media landscape evolves, we want to celebrate great journalism no matter what form it takes — whether a long-form narrative published on a website, a podcast, a newsletter, a Twitter thread, or a TikTok video.

View 2022 Winners

NYU’s American Journalism Online certificate course

This program provides aspiring journalists the flexibility to learn essential journalistic practices and skills, all on their schedule – it’s 100% online, on-demand, and completely self-paced.

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Adam L. Penenberg

Associate Professor | Director, Online Master’s in Journalism Program

B.A., Economics, Reed College

In a wide-ranging career as a writer, editor, columnist, and film producer, Professor Penenberg has written for Fast Company, Forbes, the New York Times, Washington Post, Wired, Slate, Playboy, and the Economist. A former senior editor at Forbes and a reporter for Forbes.com , Penenberg garnered national attention in 1998 for unmasking serial fabricator Stephen Glass of the New Republic. Penenberg’s story was a watershed for online investigative journalism and portrayed in the film Shattered Glass (Steve Zahn plays Penenberg). He wrote the popular “Media Hack” column for Wired News, was a columnist for Slate, and a contributing writer to Fast Company magazine.

Melanie Hicken

Melanie Hicken

Adjunct Faculty

Melanie Hicken is an award-winning investigative reporter for CNN. Her work has exposed everything from widespread sexual abuse in nursing homes to one of the longest-running scams in history. It has also inspired legislative action and government investigation.

Hicken and her longtime reporting partner, Blake Ellis’s groundbreaking investigation into the secret world of government debt collectors won the prestigious Heywood Broun Award of Distinction and inspired lawmakers to take action with legislation aimed at closing the loophole highlighted in the stories. They were finalists for a Peabody Award for CNN’s coverage of guns in America, and the two journalists have been honored by the International Association of Broadcasting, the National Press Club, the National Endowment for Financial Education, the Radio Television Digital News Association and the National Association of Consumer Advocates. Hicken regularly appears on CNN and other television and radio networks to discuss her investigations.

Nidhi Prakash

Nidhi Prakash

Nidhi Prakash covers politics for BuzzFeed News. For the past year, she’s been on the campaign trail covering the presidential election and specifically the Biden campaign. Before that, she worked on Capitol Hill, reported on federal agencies, the Syrian refugee crisis, and broke news on the death toll in Puerto Rico from Hurricane Maria.

She previously worked in the UK, Chile, and started her career in Australian public radio.

Garnette Cadogan, Photo Credit: Vivek Bald

Garnette Cadogan

Garnette Cadogan is an essayist. His writing explores the promise and perils of urban life, the vitality and inequality of cities, and the challenges of pluralism. He writes about culture and the arts for various publications, and, in Fall 2017, was included in a list of 29 writers from around the world who “represent the future of new writing.”

He is editor-at-large of  Nonstop Metropolis: A New York City Atlas  (co-edited by Rebecca Solnit and Joshua Jelly-Schapiro), and is at work on a book on walking.

Julia dahl

Julia Dahl has worked as an associate features editor at Marie Claire, a city desk reporter for the New York Post, the deputy managing editor of The Crime Report, and a crime and justice reporter for CBS News. She has been the recipient of a John Jay/H.F. Guggenheim fellowship in criminal justice journalism, as well as a fellowship from the Nation Institute Investigative Fund. Julia has a BA from Yale, an MFA from The New School, and an MA in journalism from American University.

Julia is also the author of four novels – INVISIBLE CITY, RUN YOU DOWN, CONVICTION, and THE MISSING HOURS (2021). INVISIBLE CITY and CONVICTION were both named best books of the year by the Boston Globe, and INVISIBLE CITY was a finalist for the Edgar Award for Best First Novel and has been translated into eight languages.

Liza Hogan

Liza Hogan is a founder and longtime senior producer for CNN.com where she covered a number of major stories from 9/11 to Hurricane Katrina, the 2004 presidential campaign, and the 2008 election of Barack Obama. Later, as a founder and editor for PBS’s NextAvenue.org , she helped design and manage a startup news website for adults 50 and older. She earned her master’s in journalism from Northwestern University and currently works as a digital strategies consultant in Washington, D.C.

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Get Published

Collaborate with classmates from around the world on our publication, The Click—written, edited, and produced by you.

Read The Click

NYU Arthur L. Carter Journalism Institute - American Journalism Online

What are online journalism classes at NYU like?

As an online master’s student, you’ll collaborate with instructors and peers from all over the globe. We keep our classes small—writing courses are capped at 13 students, multimedia at 10. This allows for copious amounts of face time with professors and fellow students. Professors offer intensive feedback on every assignment. Our ultimate goal is to train the next generation of great journalists to change the world.

We don’t assign textbooks that are out of date before they are even published. Instead, for every course we create our own interactive textbook, which we constantly update to reflect the relentless change that characterizes the world we live in. And we commission professional journalists to create interactive modules—cultivating sources and building source networks, fact-checking, combing through business filings to find great stories, digging up hard-to-find information online, information security, and even surviving as a photojournalist in a conflict zone.

Before class you’ll conduct research and actually report from your town or city, recording interviews and gathering facts. Then you’ll write stories on a wide variety of topics and in a range of styles, or shoot and edit video or create podcast segments. During class, you’ll workshop your assignments to get them ready for our program’s news site. You’ll debate ideas, ask questions, raise issues, and take turns acting as the publication’s executive editor. As with most professional media companies today, you’re only a click away from your editors and fellow reporters.

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Reporting the News

Choose a beat and start reporting—then publish your work on our online publication.

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Feature Writing

Use your words: learn to captivate and enthrall readers with vivid storytelling.

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Long-Form Narrative

Read great works of journalism, then write your own.

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Audio Storytelling

Learn how to produce your own podcasts and share them with the world.

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Investigative Reporting

Chase leads, dig dirt, sift through data, and follow the money.

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Law & Ethics in American Journalism

History, ethics, law—learn how to navigate murky waters.

Note : All classes meet once a week from 7-10 pm ET.

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Meet Our Students

To study journalism at NYU is like winning the golden ticket in Willy Wonka. I feel honored to be the first Arab-American in the program, allowing me to give the world a glimpse of the phenomenal achievements and progressive changes in the region.

Sabal Almadi | Dhahran, Saudi Arabia

Public Relations Specialist & Writer, part-time student

The storytelling that I care most about is within the social justice movement—local, grassroots efforts of people trying to make this country better.

Audra | New York, NY

Writer and organizer, full-time student

I am able to build relationships within my classes thanks to our live classroom atmosphere and I really get to know my teachers on a level I never thought was possible.

Lauren | Philadelphia, PA

Photographer, full-time student

I’m always looking for that intersection between medicine and LGBTQ+ rights

Zak | Harrison, NJ

Writer, story editor, former surgical technician, alumnus

Hard work, sleepless nights, tight deadlines mixed with a little bit of stress. But wow, is it fun.

Nicole | New York, NY

National news producer, mom, part-time student

I want to help those who lack a voice. That’s why I want to be a journalist.

Grace | Los Angeles, CA

Journalist, history buff, part-time student

A small island girl with big city dreams of publishing my own magazine!

Nasia | Nassau, BS

Copyeditor, daydreamer, part-time student

My passion project for the past few years has been looking at the impact of media narratives, particularly in rural spaces.

Michelle | Louisville, KY

Journalist, home renovator, full-time student

My line of work now, it sort of has a stigma, working in fashion in general. I’d like to be able to change that.

Lindsay | Jersey City, NJ

Fashion professional, traveler, part-time student

I left my sports career to start a family. Raising two young kids and another on the way, I wanted to bridge the gap between working years, motherhood, and planning for the future.

Tiffany | Vero Beach, FL

Former sports reporter, mom, part-time student

I love telling stories! Our stories make up a big part of who we are, and I want to help people find and tell theirs.

Megan | Madison, WI

Healthcare IT, avid reader, part-time student

AJO Alumni Photos

AJO graduates are working all over the media landscape: from breaking news and culture writing, to podcast and video production, to non-profit newsletters, to anchoring local news. Read what they have to say about how the program helped them achieve their career goals.

The Forward

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Your Future Can Be Now

How to apply

Program News

Spotlight PA

AJO students begin reporting partnership with Spotlight PA

Kate Mays, Paige Willett, and Wynter Muro - all students in Prof. Eliza Griswold's Feature Writing course - dug into all the candidates for auditor general in the first of a series of planned collaborations with the non-profit newsroom.

Robert Davis Headshot

AJO Alum honored by Colorado Press Association

Robert Davis (AJO 2022) took home two first place awards, one for investigative reporting and one for environmental reporting.

Adriana Teresa headshot

AJO Alum named inaugural Alexia Fellow

Adriana Teresa Letorney (AJO 2021), founder of Visura, has been named the inaugural Alexia Fellow at Syracuse University's Newhouse School of Communication. Letourney will receive $50,000 to work on a project to help emerging professional photographers and visual storytellers better understand the market for editorial photography.

Brian Bull headshot

AJO Alum Tapped as University of Oregon Journalism Professor

Brian Bull (AJO 2023) will be an assistant professor teaching audio production and covering Native/Indigenous communities, among other topics. Bull is a longtime, award-winning reporter for KLCC, Eugene's public radio station.

View All News

Request more info

If you have further questions about the online master’s degree in journalism, please contact our program director Adam Penenberg or admin team at [email protected] . For press inquiries contact James M. Devitt , and read our press release .

Adam Penenberg

Program Director [email protected]

Frequently Asked Questions

This program requires 30 credits, which is at least six fewer than the other journalism programs at NYU. You’ll take seven 4-credit courses and one 2-credit course. You can look up the latest information regarding tuition and fees by academic year on our NYU Bursar’s Website . As an online student you won’t have to move to New York, no need for a visa for international students, and you can continue to work through our flexible part-time options while earning a master’s degree from a prestigious university.

Nearly all students in the Arthur L. Carter Journalism Institute, like the majority of MA students in other departments at NYU, are financing their own graduate study through external funding awards or student loans. Information on external funding opportunities and student loans follows.

To receive federal or state financial aid you must be a U.S. citizen, U.S. national, or permanent resident of the United States. If you would like to learn more about funding options that may benefit international students at NYU, please visit the Financial Aid and Scholarships website.

Payment Plans defer tuition or allow you to pay tuition monthly.

Student Loans: U.S. applicants interested in federal student loans should fill out the FAFSA application after January 1 of the year in which they are seeking admission: fafsa.ed.gov.

Detailed information on filing the FAFSA application is found on-line at the NYU Financial Aid website . The NYU Federal School Code is 002785. At the graduate level, federal financial aid consists primarily of federal subsidized and unsubsidized student loans.

International applicants interested in student loans can find sources of loans available to international students at the NYU Financial Aid website . The website also lists other resources available to international applicants and students.

Payments from students living outside the United States must be in U.S. dollars.

Please visit our How to Apply page.

The online program is flexible. Students may complete the program in as little as 1 year, or take their time, as long as they graduate within 5 years. Visit this page to see some potential pathways to completing the program in 1, 1.5, 2, or 3 years.

  • Internet-connection – broadband wired or wireless (3G or 4G/LTE)
  • Speakers and a microphone – built-in or USB plug-in or wireless Bluetooth
  • A webcam or HD webcam – built-in or USB plug-in
  • Or, a HD cam or HD camcorder with video capture card
  • Mac OS X with MacOS 10.7 or later
  • Windows 8 or 8.1
  • Windows Vista with SP1 or later
  • Windows XP with SP3 or later
  • Ubuntu 12.04 or higher
  • Mint 17.1 or higher
  • Red Hat Enterprise Linux 6.4 or higher
  • Oracle Linux 6.4 or higher
  • CentOS 6.4 or higher
  • Fedora 21 or higher
  • OpenSUSE 13.2 or higher
  • ArchLinux (64-bit only)
  • Surface PRO 2 running Win 8.1
  • Surface PRO 3 running Win 10
  • iOS and Android devices
  • Blackberry devices
  • Windows: IE7+, Firefox, Chrome, Safari5+
  • Mac: Safari5+, Firefox, Chrome
  • Linux: Firefox, Chrome

Other than an internet-connected device for virtual class meetings (see previous question about technical requirements), you do not need to purchase additional equipment. You can use whatever equipment you already own, or we’ll teach you about shooting and editing video on your smartphone. If you don’t own one, we can work around that. Our motto is: whatever works.

No journalism experience is required. The program considers applicants holding a bachelor’s degree in any field. As long as you have an interest in writing and reporting, can produce a writing sample and provide three references who are familiar with your work, you’re on the right track.

English-as-a-second-language help can be provided for those who need it. Non-native English speakers must take the TOEFL (Test of English as a Foreign Language) OR the IELTS (International English Language Testing System). The TOEFL or IELTS requirement is waived if your undergraduate or graduate degree was completed at an institution where the language of instruction is English.

GSAS recommends that applicants achieve a minimum TOEFL score of 100 on the internet-based test (equivalent to 250 on the computer-based test or 600 on the paper-based test). For the IELTS, a minimum overall band score of at least 7 is recommended.

No, the online masters program does not have a physical location. We serve students from all over the world in a completely virtual environment. All accepted students will receive an NYU student ID in the mail which will grant access to the Bobst Library, if you happen to be in New York City.

The Graduate Record Examination (GRE) is not required.

Non-native English speakers must take the TOEFL (Test of English as a Foreign Language) OR the IELTS (International English Language Testing System). The TOEFL or IELTS requirement is waived if your undergraduate or graduate degree was completed at an institution where the language of instruction is English.

NYU journalism graduates go on to work in newsrooms around the world as reporters, editors, producers, anchors, videographers, podcasters, fact-checkers and a plethora of other job titles—this industry is always changing.

If you have questions, please contact our admin team at [email protected] .

Yes, the online program is flexible. Students may complete the program in as little as 1 year, or take their time, as long as they graduate within 5 years. Visit this page to see some potential pathways to completing the program in 1,1.5, 2, or 3 years.

No, the courses in the online journalism masters were designed specially for this program.

For a student enrolled in a distance education program or course, please reference NYU’s state authorization website for further information detailing the applicable complaint process. NYU’s Master’s in American Journalism Online distance education complaint contact is Allan Corns, and you may reach him at [email protected] .

Graduate Publishing and Writing (MA)

Advance your knowledge of today’s publishing and writing trends

GRE requirements

Award-winning literary journals on campus

Credit hours

About the Graduate Publishing and Writing Program

Emerson College’s on-campus Publishing and Writing MA program will help you discover your place in the ever-vital, ever-changing field of publishing. You will learn to shape the prose of fresh voices as an editor, represent writers as a literary agent, or work with exciting online publications and new media formats. 

Housed in the Department of Writing, Literature and Publishing in the School of the Arts, our program allows you to explore all facets of publishing in the publishing hub of Boston. Our experienced faculty provide a comprehensive overview of the publishing of books and magazine media via print, digital, video, social media, and other platforms. You will enjoy the flexibility to take a variety of creative writing and literature courses that suit your interests and goals.

Program Highlights 

  • A dynamic curriculum that builds a solid foundation of skills in book, magazine, and digital publishing
  • An emphasis on hands-on learning, with options such as working on the Emerson College-owned digital publication The Independent and with community partners (current and former partners include the Boston Globe Magazine , Bookbuilders of Boston, and Artists for Humanity)
  • Internship opportunities at a wide variety of publishers (such as children's and adult trade, academic, magazine media, and news) and publishing-related firms
  • Study full-time or part-time in person on our beautiful Boston campus
  • Most classes, whether in-person or online, are offered in the evening to maximize flexibility
  • Access to a vast alumni network
  • No GRE requirements to apply

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Program details.

  • Curriculum Requirements
  • Emerson Advantage
  • Tuition & Financial Aid

4+1 Bachelor’s to Master’s Program

Our Publishing and Writing MA program is available to current Emerson undergraduate students who are interested in pursuing a master’s degree in just one additional year. For more information, visit our 4+1 MA in Publishing page.

Explore Similar Programs

  • Popular Fiction Writing and Publishing (MFA)
  • Writing for Film and Television (MFA)
  • Creative Writing (MFA)

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masters in digital writing

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Innovative, inspirational, illuminating: three educators honored with teaching awards.

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  • MA Rhetoric, Writing, and Digital Media Studies (RWDMS)

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English - Rhetoric, Writing, and Digital Media Studies, Master of Arts

The Master of Arts in English - Rhetoric, Writing, and Digital Media Studies provides a curriculum that will prepare you to participate and advance current knowledge and practices in rhetoric, writing pedagogy, and composition theory and practice, and to use your understanding of research methodologies and writing skills in your academic writing, workplace writing, and information development.   The program focuses on providing quality instruction for students who are interested in language, literacy, and learning in contemporary society; who wish to teach writing or who teach in K-12, college, or specialized settings; and who intend to focus on community or workplace literacy programs.   The program in Rhetoric, Writing and Digital Media Studies allows students to follow a clearly articulated plan that provides for structure within a flexible framework, and that provides the skills necessary for succeeding in competitive work environments.

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To receive a master’s degree at Northern Arizona University, you must complete a planned group of courses from one or more subject areas, consisting of at least 30 units of graduate-level courses. Many master’s degree programs require more than 30 units. You must additionally complete:

  • All requirements for your specific academic plan(s). This may include a thesis.
  • All graduate work with a cumulative grade point average of at least 3.0.
  • All work toward the master's degree must be completed within six consecutive years. The six years begins with the semester and year of admission to the program.

Read the full policy here .

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In addition to University Requirements:

  • Complete individual plan requirements.

Purpose Statement The Rhetoric, Writing and Digital Media Studies program provides a curriculum that prepares students to excel as writers, scholars, and teachers. The program emphasizes the importance of critical reading, reflection, writing, digital media, and spoken language to cultivate knowledgeable citizens who understand and appreciate their civic, professional, and personal responsibilities in local and global communities. We specialize in preparing students for intercultural and interdisciplinary communication practices in digital and traditional work settings to further global engagement, diversity, and social participation. Students gain advanced skills in rhetorical theory and persuasive argumentation, social media literacy, multimedia writing, and design, professional and public discourse conventions, and teaching literacy and writing through theory-based application projects. They acquire the necessary tools to participate in local and global communities, and they establish a foundation of diverse writing practices for academic and workplace settings. Student Learning Outcomes  Theory and Knowledge: Examine and evaluate the major theories in rhetoric, writing, and digital media studies by participating in and advancing current knowledge and practices in the field.

  • Evaluate and reflect critically on rhetorical terms and concepts used by rhetoricians from classical to modern times.
  • Evaluate similarities and differences in the uses of language, the connections between organization and structure used in specific time periods, the connections between style and delivery, and the connections between persuasion and argumentation used in specific time periods.
  • Understand how language practices during specific time periods were and are used to communicate about the diversity of human experience.
  • Demonstrate knowledge of the contributions of rhetoric to workplace studies, literacy studies, narrative studies, digital studies, cultural studies, gender studies, and race studies.
  • Research, evaluate, and apply rhetorical principles from classical to modern times for academic, professional and public discourse

  Demonstrate an advanced understanding of research methodologies and writing skills applicable to English studies, including academic writing, workplace writing, and information development.

  • Evaluate and reflect critically on methodological practices and concepts used in research designs in rhetoric, writing, and digital media studies.
  • Understand research as a recursive process.
  • Use research data to formulate or evaluate new research questions, using reason and persuasion in a logical argument.
  • Summarize and evaluate a body of research, including primary and secondary sources.
  • Demonstrate competent, ethical, and responsible use of information in academic and workplace writing.

  Analysis and Critical Thinking: Critically analyze how cultural artifacts (written, digital, visual, and spoken texts) shape identities and ideologies in diverse local, national, historical, and global communities.

  • Research, evaluate, and apply knowledge of significant issues related to global learning, diversity, and sustainable educational and environmental practices.
  • Write critical analyses exploring key texts and key concepts about historical and current rhetorical terms and concepts.
  • Research, evaluate, and apply historical knowledge of rhetorical terms and concepts to show how contemporary language use is influenced by cultural knowledge.
  • Research, evaluate, and apply rhetorical principles from classical to modern times to ethnically and linguistically diverse populations.
  • Tailor your academic and professional work to a specific audience and focus your writing on a specific purpose.

  Apply theoretical and practical knowledge to projects that synthesize and evaluate appropriate research, scholarship, and methodologies in rhetoric, writing, and digital studies

  • Design text and digital projects that show the ethical use of language in diverse academic, public, and professional communities.
  • Understand how cultural, racial, ethnic, gender, and economic factors influence communication practices in text and digital environments.
  • Research, evaluate, and apply rhetorical principles to question current norms and dominant cultural assumptions expressed in text and digital media.
  • Design and present text and media that addresses experiential learning
  • Design and present projects that show a clear understanding of purpose, audience, and cultural, social, historical, and political contexts.

  Research and Application: Apply rhetorical, pedagogical, narrative, new media, and workplace theories and practices by carrying out advanced course-related and client-related projects directed at conceptualizing, researching, understanding, and reformulating current theories in the field of rhetoric and writing studies through appropriate professional activities (conferences, presentations, publications, social action, grants, internships, practicum experiences, extended research projects, fieldwork, and other activities).

  • Articulate a theoretical framework for the project (including a literature review to assess the theoretical and methodological contributions previously made to this area).
  • Identify and define appropriate methods of data collection and apply appropriate research methods.
  • Use a research design appropriate to the audience and purpose of your project, showing understanding of rhetorical approaches to multimedia design.
  • Evaluate the effectiveness of the project and its implications to the field of rhetoric, writing, and digital media.
  • Analyze, interpret and explain your findings and your project in an extensive project write-up.
  • Present your original research to professional and non-professional audiences, articulating sustained, coherent explanations of your work.
  • Apply appropriate writing and design standards and literacy skills to succeed in academic, civic, and personal life.

  Actively participate in local, national, and global communities of academic and workplace writers by participating in professional development activities, and by creating and updating online profiles.

  • Identify your career and learning goals and develop a personal career development plan based on your strengths and goals (Introduction to Rhetoric and Writing Studies).
  • Effectively represent your experience, skills and competencies through written (resume, cover letter, social media, application materials) and verbal (interview skills, presentation skills, etc.) communication (Analysis courses, research projects course).
  • Develop your project management skills (especially Workplace Writing and research projects).
  • Establish, maintain, and grow your professional network (start in intro to Rhetoric and WS, continue in Analysis courses, and in research projects course).
  • Increase your experience and marketability, as well as your level of knowledge about career opportunities, through internships or projects (internships and research project course).
  •  Apply appropriate communication and presentation standards to succeed in academic, civic, and personal life.
  • Establish an online professional presence by designing, adding on a regular basis, and updating a digital portfolio.

Details Accordion Closed

Graduate admission information.

The NAU graduate online application is required for all programs. Admission to many graduate programs is on a competitive basis, and programs may have higher standards than those established by the Graduate College. Admission requirements include the following:

  • Transcripts.
  • Undergraduate degree from a regionally accredited institution with a 3.0 GPA on a 4.0 scale ("A" = 4.0), or the equivalent.

Visit the NAU Graduate Admissions website for additional information about graduate school application deadlines, eligibility for study, and admissions policies. Ready to apply? Begin your application now.

International applicants have additional admission requirements. Please see the International Graduate Admissions Policy .

Additional Admission Requirements

Individual program admission requirements over and above admission to NAU are required.

  • Two letters of recommendation
  • Personal statement or essay
  • Resume or curriculum vitae
  • Writing Sample

Master's Requirements

This Master’s degree requires 36 units distributed as follows:

  • Theoretical Context: 9 units
  • Analysis: 12 units
  • Application: 6 units
  • Elective courses selected in consultation with your advisor: 9 units

Take the following 36 units: Theoretical Context (9 units) :

  • ENG 560 , ENG 561 , ENG 562

Analysis; take the following four courses (12 units) :

  • ENG 622 , ENG 623 , ENG 624 , ENG 626

Application; take 3 units from each applications course (6 units) :

  • ENG 563 , ENG 686

Three elective courses, chosen with your advisor’s approval (9 units)

Additional Information

Be aware that some courses may have prerequisites that you must also successfully complete. For prerequisite information, click on the course or see your advisor.

Availability Accordion Closed

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  • strengthen your critical and analytical writing abilities necessary for teachers, writers, and scholars;
  • prepare you to complete practical research projects needed in your current or future academic or workplace settings; and
  • provide you with the tools to continue your studies in rhetoric, composition, communications, professional writing, and related fields.

Degree availability

  • Flagstaff Mountain Campus: Study at the Flagstaff Mountain Campus, apply for a graduate teaching assistantship, and work with full-time faculty experts. Those studying at the Flagstaff Mountain campus will take both face-to-face and online courses.
  • Online: Study online with full-time faculty experts, pay competitive tuition rates. No residency required.

Length of program

Funding and tuition, employment after graduation.

  • teaching writing/composition at the high school and college level
  • social media/digital content writing, content production, and marketing
  • grant and science writing
  • editing and technical writing
  • freelance writing
  • community organizing and marketing

Preparation for future studies

  • Arizona State University
  • Michigan Technological University
  • New Mexico State University
  • Texas Technological University
  • Syracuse University
  • University of Arizona
  • University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign
  • University of New Mexico

Questions? Please contact

Department of english, mailing address.

Enter a Search Term

Publishing, ms.

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Prepare for an Exciting and Evolving Industry

Earn a degree that will prepare you for the future for publishing. Our MS in Publishing equips you with the skills and knowledge necessary to launch and maintain a successful career in the dynamic publishing and media industries.

Build Your Skills and Network

  • Our comprehensive curriculum reflects the most current industry innovations and is taught by industry professionals.
  • You will develop expertise in the critical area of content creation and editing and gain a strong foundation in the business of publishing, digital media, editorial, and marketing skills.
  • Internships help students link their academic success with the kind of practical experience employers are looking for. Our internship program helps you build professional relationships while applying classroom knowledge at a wide range of publishers, literary agencies, and publishing-related companies such as Simon & Schuster, W.W. Norton, Jean V. Naggar Literary Agency, Macmillan, Children's Book Council, Oxford University Press, Publishers Weekly, and Hachette Book Group, among many other companies.

Take Courses Like…

At the heart of our 36-credit program is a core curriculum, on-line and in-person, designed to provide you with a comprehensive, fully integrated overview of the industry—books, magazines, print, and digital.

  • PUB 604 Rewriting and Line Editing
  • PUB 615 Publishing Comics & Graphic Novels
  • PUB 622A Entrepreneurship
  • PUB 622M Metadata for Books
  • PUB 624 Editorial Principles and Practices
  • PUB 634 Children’s Book Publishing
  • PUB 637 Children's Book Marketing

Add Opportunities and Experiences

We provide you with guidance through every step of your academic career and offer numerous opportunities for you to gain professional experience through internships and graduate assistantships, and through our One-to-One Mentoring program that connects you one-to-one with industry professionals.

  • Students in the program receive weekly news about the latest job and internship opportunities.
  • Program provides you with access to publishing events in New York and abroad.
  • Program events include speed-mentoring and special lectures by publishing luminaries that provide networking opportunities for students.
  • Industry organizations are an important part of the MS in Publishing program in that our association with them allows students exclusive access to industry events and conferences for educational and networking purposes.
  • The MS in Publishing Blog serves as an essential resource for current students, alumni, and faculty. One of the main objectives is to provide currently enrolled students, prospective students, and alumni with a forum for departmental news as well as alumni and faculty profiles and interviews.
  • Student Appreciation Events are held each spring to honor both current students and alumni of the program. All currently enrolled students are invited to attend and these events provide students an opportunity to network with faculty, alumni, and publishing professionals.
"As someone who moved to New York with no knowledge of the industry and even less knowledge of where I belonged in it, the Pace MS in Publishing program not only helped me find my place, but also allowed me to make the connections I needed and find lifelong friends along the way. The professors at Pace have a desire to see their students succeed which makes all the difference. Two semesters into the program I was able to intern with Simon & Schuster and immediately after was hired by Hachette Book Group and I wouldn’t have been able to do it without professors like Manuela Soares mentoring and advocating for me. " —Ely Mellet '18, Junior Designer at Scholastic

Choose Your Career

You may choose to complete an internship, during which you will acquire practical work experience in the publishing field. A dedicated faculty member will work to connect you with potential internship employers, help you develop cover letters and resumes, and facilitate peer-to-peer discussion about their experiences.

Where Graduates are Employed

  • Abrams Books
  • Conde Nast Publications, Inc
  • Hachette Book Group
  • HarperCollins Publishers
  • Penguin Random House
  • Simon & Schuster
  • W.W. Norton

View a complete list on the Publishing department site.

of Dyson College of Arts and Sciences graduates from the class of 2019 are employed, continuing their education, or are doing volunteer or military service. (Source: Pace University Career Services)

average salary for graduates with a MS in Publishing Degree (Source: PayScale.com)

What You Need to Know

The GRE isn’t necessary, but all other requirements of the degree program apply to the certificate programs. Please see Graduate Application Procedures for the requirements.

Related Programs

Book publishing certificate, magazine publishing certificate, business aspects of publishing certificate, digital publishing certificate.

Literary Arts

Graduate students in Brown's Literary Arts MFA program may choose to focus in one of three tracks – Fiction, Poetry, or Digital/Cross Disciplinary Writing. The Graduate School has notified candidates regarding admission decisions for Fall 2024 in all three tracks: Cross-Disciplinary, Fiction and Poetry.

The two-year program is structured to allow graduate student writers maximum possible time for creative and intellectual exploration. Students attend two courses each semester: the writing workshop and an elective in the first three semesters (with an additional half-course in pedagogy in semesters two and three); and in the final semester an independent study for completing the thesis as well as an elective.

Elective courses may be selected from among the full offerings of the Brown University curriculum. In years past, students have taken courses in literature, history, philosophy, theater and performance studies, modern culture and media, religious studies, and foreign languages. Studio fine arts courses and translation workshops are often appropriate choices – as are workshops offered on special topics or in other genres. 

The thesis may be a substantial work of fiction or poetry, or a substantial digital or cross-disciplinary project. It is intended to represent the student’s achievement during the two years in residency at Brown.

Application deadline

Applications  may be submitted from 30 September to 11:59 pm ET on 15 December 2023. If seeking a fee waiver , the deadline is 1 December.

Learn More About the Program

Graduate program handbook, learn about applying, financial information.

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Master of Arts in Digital Content

Transfer credits, next start date, capture your company’s best side with an online master’s degree in digital content.

In today’s fast-paced, tech-saturated world, companies face an enormous challenge — finding ways to stand out to consumers whose brains are constantly being bombarded with information. How can an organization’s voice be heard when it must compete with thousands of other businesses for consumers’ attention? The answer: online video content.

The average person’s attention span is limited, so to reach consumers, companies must use techniques that are gripping, impactful, and to the point. Video content is all of these and so much more. A well-made video can engage viewers with its visual appeal, interesting story, and thought-provoking call to action.

With Liberty University’s online M.A. in Digital Content, you’ll learn how to craft powerful messages through video promotions and marketing. In addition, you can be equipped for in-demand jobs that let you exercise your creativity in the world of visual communications.

Why Choose Our Master’s in Digital Content Design Online Graduate Program?

Our professors use innovative teaching methods to give you a quality education that prepares you for the job market. Drawing on years of real-world experience in the communications field, our faculty can provide first-hand training in the areas of promotion, video, and media design.

Companies need people who are skilled at creating video content that engages audiences and achieves specific business goals. With our master’s in video content, you can gain an edge over your competition and stand out to employers. In addition, you’ll acquire a diverse skill set that can help you land a job working in digital promotions for many different businesses, agencies, and nonprofits.

At Liberty, we want to help you follow God’s calling on your life. That’s why our professors won’t just teach you on-the-job skills—they’ll also help you learn how to live out your faith in the workplace.  And with our master’s in digital content, you’ll complete all of your classes online. That way, you can earn your degree without putting your life on hold. You can pursue your academic and career goals while still focusing on your family, job, and home life.

The field of visual communications is growing at a rapid pace, and professionals who have a video master’s degree are in high demand across many industries. At Liberty, you can improve your communications skills and prepare to enter the business world as a leader in innovation and promotional techniques. Join us and learn how to help your company reach more consumers, increase its publicity, and enhance its reputation.

What Will You Learn in Our Master’s in Digital Content Design Program?

In this master’s degree, you’ll study the theories that are behind successful promotional campaigns. In addition, you’ll learn how to use these theories to achieve tangible results that will help your business reach its target audience. Your courses will also give you the chance to analyze and create visual promotional pieces using techniques for video storytelling, social media, and mobile platforms.

Furthermore, your classes will incorporate hands-on projects that can prepare you for the real world of video marketing. These opportunities will challenge your creativity and problem-solving abilities and help you build a portfolio that can highlight your skills and get you noticed by employers. In addition, the interactive design of your courses will help maximize your knowledge and potential.

Throughout this program, you’ll explore why social videos are such a key part of digital marketing campaigns. Using this fundamental knowledge, you’ll learn how to develop types of content that appeal to viewers, as well as how to incorporate videos into commercials, social media, web promotions, and more.

After completing this online master’s degree, you will be able to:

  • Formulate and apply a working knowledge of promotion and video content tools.
  • Tell an organization’s story on a variety of digital platforms.
  • Collaborate with your production team to create targeted messages that will reach your intended audience.
  • Understand how to form a compelling story and use this knowledge to develop content that engages, informs, and persuades people who watch your videos.
  • Increase your chances of finding employment and advancing your career.

Digital Content Featured Courses

  • COMS 560 – Communication and Conflict
  • STCO 532 – Media Technologies and Communication Strategies
  • STCO 533 – Video, Social and Mobile Promotion
  • STCO 622 – Strategic Organizational Communication

Master’s in Digital Content Program Highlights

  • We are recognized by multiple institutions for our academic quality, affordability, and accessibility . Our commitment to excellence also helped us rank in the top 10% of Niche.com’s best online schools in America . Earning your online M.A. in Digital Content degree from a nonprofit university with this kind of recognition can help set you apart from others in your field.
  • Tuition for our M.A. in Digital Content degree has not increased in 9 years. While many other online colleges have raised tuition, Liberty has been able to keep costs low as a nonprofit university.
  • Our program includes a flexible schedule that lets you earn your degree without putting your life on hold.
  • Finish your master’s degree in promotion and video content in under 2 years.
  • Become a Champion for Christ and learn how to incorporate biblical principles into your career.

Master’s in Digital Content Degree Information

  • This program falls under the School of Communication and the Arts . 
  • Download and review the Degree Completion Plan for this program.
  • View the Graduate Communication and the Arts Course Guides ( login required ).

Apply Now    Request Info

Master’s in Promotion and Video Content Degree Online Military Benefits

Liberty University is dedicated to providing world-class educational experiences to military students across the globe. Whether you are a current service member, discharged or retired from service, or the spouse of a service member or veteran, we are here to support you every step of the journey.

As a thank-you for your dedication and service to our country, Liberty is honored to serve and support you in your pursuit of online education by offering the following benefits:

  • Tuition discounts – $275 per credit hour for graduate courses
  • Additional discount for veterans who serve in a civilian capacity as a First Responder (less than $625 per course)
  • 8-week courses, 8 different start dates each year, and no set login times (may exclude certain courses such as practicums, internships, or field experiences)

What Can You Do with a Master’s in Digital Content?

  • Church video manager
  • Communications director
  • Customer relations manager
  • Employee relations manager
  • Graphic designer
  • Marketing director
  • Recruitment coordinator
  • Social media manager
  • Vice president of customer satisfaction

Admission Requirements for Our Online M.A. in Digital Content 

A regionally or nationally accredited bachelor’s degree with a 3.0 or above cumulative GPA is required for admission in good standing. Please visit our  admission requirements page  for more detailed admissions-related information.

All applicants must submit the following:

  • Admission application
  • Application fee*
  • Official college transcripts
  • Unofficial college transcripts may be accepted with a completed official transcript request form**
  • Proof of English proficiency (for applicants whose native language is other than English)

*There is no upfront application fee; however, a deferred $50 application fee will be assessed during Financial Check-In. This fee is waived for qualifying service members, veterans, and military spouses – documentation verifying military status is required.

**An official transcript is needed within 60 days of acceptance or before non-attendance drops for the first set of matriculated classes, whichever comes first.

*Some restrictions may occur for this promotion to apply. This promotion also excludes active faculty and staff, military, Non-Degree Seeking, DGIA, Continuing Education, WSB, and Certificates.

Apply FREE This Week*

Other programs you may be interested in

Master of Arts (MA)

Professional Writing

Next Start Date: May 13, 2024

Strategic Communication

Visual communication design.

Master of Business Administration (MBA)

Master of Business Administration: Marketing

Master of Science (MS)

Marketing: Digital Marketing and Advertising

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You have to have a lot of self-motivation and self-discipline when you are going to school online, but the amazing thing is at Liberty you do not need to do it by yourself. You really do have resources like someone who is going to school on campus.

– Janae Fleming ’15, B.S. in Education

Digital Storytelling Graduate Certificate

Get Started

No Application Required

Online and On Campus Options

Number of Required Courses

Learn how to produce and distribute journalistic content through engaging, innovative digital formats.

Through this certificate you will gain the skills you need to develop or enhance a career in journalism, marketing, or digital communication.

What You'll Learn

  • Learn the fundamentals of journalism, including interviewing, reporting, and crafting a narrative.
  • Gain an understanding of trends such as photojournalism, media mashups, freelancing, and journalistic branding.
  • Develop technical skills for the development and dissemination of content for digital production, including photography, video production, audio recording, and visualizations.
  • Uncover new ways of telling stories via social media, podcasting, and other digital platforms.

Certificate Courses

The professional graduate certificate in digital storytelling requires four 4-credit courses, or 16 credits.

You may choose from the following course groups, using the certificate course search.

  • Journalism (choose two courses from select group)
  • Digital communication (choose two courses from select group)

Courses taken before the 2018-2019 academic year do not apply toward this certificate.

Search for Courses

You can browse courses by term — fall, spring, or summer — in the DCE Course Search & Registration platform.

Upcoming Term: Summer 2024

Summer course registration is open through June 20. Learn more about how to register →

Fall 2024 courses and registration details will be live in June.

Our Community at a Glance

Students discover new methods of research, writing, editing, and digital technologies with peers and faculty from around the world.

Received a Promotion or Added Responsibilities While Pursuing

Working Full Time

Wanted to Deepen Their Knowledge to Advance Career

Would Recommend the Certificate

Earning Your Certificate

To meet the requirements for the certificate, you must:

  • Complete the  four certificate courses for graduate credit .
  • Earn at least a  B grade  in each course.
  • Complete the courses within three years .

Learn more about  pursuing a certificate  and the process of  requesting your certificate .

Affordability is core to our mission. When compared to our continuing education peers, it’s a fraction of the cost.

This graduate certificate stacks to the following degrees:

  • Journalism Master’s Degree Program
  • Museum Studies Master’s Degree Program

Harvard Division of Continuing Education

The Division of Continuing Education (DCE) at Harvard University is dedicated to bringing rigorous academics and innovative teaching capabilities to those seeking to improve their lives through education. We make Harvard education accessible to lifelong learners from high school to retirement.

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Why Digital Writing Matters in Education

Writing teachers like me (and perhaps like you) have been caught in a tight spot for some time now. On the one hand, computing technologies have radically transformed the meaning of "writing." On the other hand, high stakes assessments and their impact on teaching have limited what counts as writing in school.

As a teacher, I feel pulled in different directions. Thankfully, there are some good educational resources available. The National Writing Project recently published Because Digital Writing Matters: Improving Student Writing in Online and Multimedia Environments by Danielle Nicole DeVoss, Elyse Eidman-Aadahl and Troy Hicks. Their book is a good resource for teachers interested in thoughtfully incorporating digital writing into their teaching, and it also will point readers toward other high-quality resources. In the spirit of their book, I am going to take up the issue of why digital writing matters, focusing on two issues:

  • Digital writing challenges what counts as writing and reveals the gap between how writing works in the world and how we teach it in schools.
  • Digital writing platforms and services are ways to innovate instruction and learning.

Why Writing Matters

I always find it worth starting with why writing matters in education and in life. In school, writing is a key language skill (if not a subject) and also supports learning in other content areas. In a knowledge society, written expression shapes success for individuals and groups. Because of computer networks, youth now in school will write more than any prior generation in human history. Yet we pay relatively little attention to writing in school, which is why the National Commission on Writing has called writing the " forgotten R ."

A second Commission report concluded that writing is a "threshold skill" for hiring and promotion among professional employees. Those who cannot write and communicate clearly will have difficulty landing a job and little chance of promotion. Leadership positions are out of the question.

The "Digital" in Digital Writing

What distinguishes "digital" writing? Yes, technologies matter, particularly networks, which really are the big change agent in the last twenty years. But the most powerful changes are cultural. Digital writing is networked, and because of this, often deeply collaborative or coordinated. Wikipedia, for instance, is not possible without a computer network. But it is the cultural changes in how we write that an example like Wikipedia makes clear. Or consider Facebook, which is perhaps the most pervasive and commonplace collaborative writing platform in human history.

But digital technologies also have made it easy to "write" in all sorts of new ways. We can use more modes and resources, such as image, sound and video. We can remix the work of others -- with and without permission -- and share what we create more easily than ever before. And people do, all the time, and for all sorts of compelling reasons. Many of these people are our students.

It is often said that technologies don't get interesting until they become culturally meaningful. I think this is the case with the technologies of digital writing, and I can't help but contrast the dynamic ways that writing is changing in the world with what happens too often in my school. According to a recent Pew Internet and American Life survey , 86 percent of teenagers believe that writing well is important to success in life. But they don't see most of the writing that they do in their lives as "real" writing. Yet, ironically, it is the writing in which they find the most pleasure, that they do most eagerly and, arguably, that they do most successfully.

Making "the Digital" Work for Teaching and Learning

One of the problems worth solving is how to scale high quality writing instruction in ways that enrich the lives of teachers and students. We know what works in writing instruction:

  • Engaged teachers and engaging environments
  • Direct writing instruction and practice
  • Revision focused on higher order concerns, guided by review feedback and informed by shared criteria

High quality writing instruction can also be expensive and time consuming, and often schools feel as if they can't do it. Or, as a cost-saving measure, technologies like machine grading are seen as a substitute for teaching.

But the same digital technologies that enable communication and collaboration might help teachers design technologies that make their teaching lives richer and their students more productive. We have been inventing technologies like this out of our own teaching, such as Eli , a service that supports peer learning in writing. Increasingly, there are other services available that extend the ability of computer networks to be tools for learning in writing (see, for example, Crocodoc ). We need many more efforts to support and share the innovations of teachers wrestling with how to teach digital writing in their schools.

There is no question that we have been witnessing an explosion of digital writing for some time now. We are living through a period of particularly rapid changes in how we write. Digital writing matters, and our challenge is to figure out how to be useful to those interested in leveraging these new writing platforms with thoughtfulness and power.

Writing In & For Digital Environments

  • 2013 Student Projects
  • 2013 Syllabus
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What the Heck is Digital Writing and Why Should I Think it’s Important?

What is Digital Writing?

The development of modern technology has challenged educators to rethink what good academic writing is to consist of. As digital environments become more omnipresent in our modern society, the line between traditional academic writing and multi-modal digital writing will continue to blur. While professors of older generations remain bound by the belief that academic writing and writing in digital environments are entirely different entities, the fact remains that the implementation of digital writing in academic curriculums will benefit students living in this modern world.

The multimodality of digital writing makes it inherently difficult to pinpoint a singular definition of this rhetoric that challenges the norms of traditional academic writing. In her article, “ Keeping Up With Digital Writing in the College Classroom ”, Andrea Baer defines digital writing as “writing that is composed-and most often read-through digital environments and tools” (Baer 2013). However, it is clear that digital writing encompasses far more than this simple definition. Baer goes on to discuss how digital writing is wholly multimodal, and how the incorporation of images, video, and audio not only supplements the author’s text, but also “interact with one another to create new meanings and multiple potential interpretations” (Baer 2013).

The definition of digital writing can be expanded further. In her article, “ Consider the Audience ” Jen Rajchel explores the different ways in which writers can manipulate a digital platform to best suit their needs. Rajchel explains digital writing on two levels: “at one level, web writing is about writing on the web: the flexibility as a multimodal piece, the ability to nimbly circulate, and the capacity to create a network of texts. At another level, the practice is about writing for the web and situating ourselves as readers and writers within its evolving architecture” (Rajchel 2014). Rajchel’s piece not only focuses on defining the multimodality of digital writing, but also stresses the importance of online writers to utilize this multimodality to add a critical lens to their arguments and engage an online audience.

Ultimately, the multimodality of digital writing can lead to an incredibly vague definition for what it actually encompasses. In his article “ Digital Rhetoric ”, James Zappen states that digital writing is “an amalgam of more-or-less discrete components rather than a complete and integrated theory in its own right” (Zappen 2005). Zappen explains that the development of digital writing is challenging how traditional writing is composed. In particular, he notes that digital writing is transforming traditional notions of rhetoric as a mode of persuasion into a mode of “testing one’s own ideas, a contesting of others’ ideas, and a collaborative creating of ideas” (Zappen 2005).

Why is Digital Writing Important?

It is clear that digital writing has become incredibly important to the academic experience of this generation, and will continue to be for generations to come. Across the country, professors are modifying their curriculum to prepare students for life after academia. Leigh Wright’s “ Tweet Me A Story ” shows how using the social media application Twitter to supplement traditional learning methods in her journalism class can teach students to quickly and concisely compose their thoughts in order to become part of a social media conversation. In addition to teaching students how to compose thoughts quickly and concisely, Wright utilized Twitter as a way to teach students teach how to develop their voice online for the purpose of writing leads and live tweeting events.

The idea of addressing a particular audience is an important part of how digital writing helps students shape their voice online and develop writing styles that best suit their academic needs. Rajchel stresses the importance of teaching students how to address their online audience and how to determine the appropriate platform to address this audience. She says that students must “be prompted to become critical users who delineate the context, content, and circulation for each platform” (Rajchel 2014), and that it is important to develop an understanding of how to make their writing appealing to their target audience.

In addition to teaching students to create voices and writing styles that best suit the platform they are using to create digital writing, digital writing encourages participation, collaboration, and community building that can extend beyond the classroom. Zappen discusses these ideas in the section of his article regarding the formation of identities and communities, stating that digital communication and writing is not only used to persuade a reader, but also to foster “self-expression for the purpose of exploring individual and group identities and participation and collaboration for the purpose of building communities and shared interests” (Zappen 2005).

Rajchel also discusses how participation and collaboration through digital writing are an important part of the modern academic experience. She compares the skills gained from implementing digital writing into academic curriculum to skills learned in seminar style courses: “reading across disciplines, developing expertise, and delving into discussions. Students learn to challenge each other, but more importantly, themselves” (Rajchel 2014). Online, students learn to compose writing that encourages thoughtful discussion and collaboration of ideas in order to develop their ideas and share them with a given audience.

Leigh Wright’s use of Twitter as part of her class’ curriculum fostered this participation, collaboration, and community building as well. While her live tweeting exercise was designed to develop quick and concise thought by her students, the exercise also allowed students and other members of the Twittersphere to engage in discussion on the event they were covering. This open discussion in turn developed the open lines of communication between other Twitter users and students, and provide a key example of how digital writing can enhance the academic experience of students.

However, despite the fact that digital writing should  be a part of the modern academic experience, there are academics that believe that traditional writing and digital writing cannot coincide within the academic arena. In “ Set in Stone or Set in Motion? ”, authors Hudley and Holbrook give examples of teachers and students who believe that academic writing and writing online are entirely separate, and that the latter should not be a part of a student’s academic experience. In turn, these individuals fail to recognize digital writing as a development of academic writing. The article points out that the inclusion of digital writing in their curriculum merely supplements these traditional learning methods, and that there is no “either/or” dividing the two; traditional academic writing and digital writing should be taught side-by-side (Hundley & Holbrook, 2013).

The goal of these educators (Rajchel, Wright) is still the same of traditional academics: to teach students how to become better writers. While traditional academic writing skills will always be key to academic development of students, the study discussed in Hundley and Holbrook’s article states that teachers like Jen Rajchel and Leigh Wright should recognize the importance of finding ways to utilize digital mediums to make their courses relevant to students of a modern generation. If educators “can embrace the twist of technology while giving students the tools to develop their voice, tone, and unique writing style” (Wright 2013), students will better develop the digital writing skills needed in the modern world.

As a college student living in a world of rapid technological advances, the importance of courses focused on writing in digital mediums has grown exponentially since my arrival on campus. iPads and digital writing platforms have become widely implemented in curriculums across the academic spectrum, and the ability for students to utilize them as an academic tool has become an important part of our learning experience at Dickinson.

As a Policy Management major, a major that focuses on the creation of organizational policies and initiatives, I believe that the college’s decision to implement this technology into students’ learning experiences will be beneficial to the academic experience of students now and in the future. While almost everyone who attends Dickinson has a smart phone or some form of modern technology, the classes that teach students how to manipulate this technology in order to use it productively in an academic setting will provide students more than just a basic understanding of this technology. I see our class as a great example of this. Everyone in our class had a basic understanding of the iPad technology prior to taking this course. However, after learning how to utilize apps like Feedly and WordPress to create and analyze writing in digital environments, students have gained the understanding of how to compose the multimodal literature using the technology that has become commonplace in our modern society. While this class has not necessarily promoted the ideas of quick, concise thought found in “Tweet Me A Story”, this class does encourage students to project a voice that is in accordance with the subject matter discussed in our blogs found in “Consider the Audience”.

I have seen the use of digital writing employed in courses prior to this course. In my freshman year Civil War History course, our teacher assigned weekly 500 word blog posts designed to have students summarize and analyze each week’s readings. While these blog posts were only a supplement to assignments for this course, it still provided me early exposure to digital writing that has helped me throughout my academic career at Dickinson. This experience taught me how to express my ideas and thoughts in a concise manner. In a world where technology has forced us to be straightforward with our ideas (since there is so much information readily available to us), this class taught me how to formulate ideas in a way that allowed the reader to quickly understand the points I was trying to make.

As students like me graduate from college and enter the work force, companies are searching for students that have adapted to and mastered the use of the digital mediums these companies expect employees to use. Companies are rapidly adding divisions within their organizations to focus solely on their social media content and digital marketing strategies, and students with a background in digital writing will be much more appealing to these companies. Students who have had exposure to academic environments of both Rajchel and Wright, who sought to create through their use of Twitter as a means to teach quick though, concise writing, and collaboration, will be far better off than a student who has been subjected to the linear approach of traditional academic writing.

Works Cited

Jen Rajchel, “Consider the Audience,” in Web Writing: Why and How for Liberal Arts Teaching and Learning , ed. Jack Dougherty and Tennyson O’Donnell (University of Michigan Press/Trinity College ePress edition, 2014), http://epress.trincoll.edu/webwriting/chapter/rajchel .

Zappen, James P. “Digital Rhetoric: Toward An Integrated Theory.”  Technical Communication Quarterly : 319-25. Web. 21 Oct. 2015.  http://homepages.rpi.edu/~zappenj/Vita/DigitalRhetoric2005.pdf

Wright, Leigh. “Tweet Me A Story.”  Web Writing: Why and How for Liberal Arts Teaching and Learning . University of Michigan Press at Michigan Publishing. 2013. Web. 21 Oct. 2015. http://webwriting2013.trincoll.edu/engagement/wright-2013/

Baer, Andrea. “Keeping Up With… Digital Writing in the College Classroom.” 2013. Web. 21 Oct. 2015. http://www.ala.org/acrl/publications/keeping_up_with/digital_writing .

Hundley, M, & Holbrook, T 2013, ‘Set in Stone or Set in Motion?: Multimodal and Digital Writing With Preservice English Teachers’, Journal Of Adolescent & Adult Literacy , 56, 6, pp. 500-509, Education Research Complete, EBSCO host , viewed 28 October 2015.  http://eds.b.ebscohost.com/eds/detail/detail?vid=1&sid=8cf26b30-8c76-4cf0-95c0-47de6914a2fc%40sessionmgr120&hid=111&bdata=JnNpdGU9ZWRzLWxpdmU%3d#AN=85862587&db=ehh

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  • Graduate Technical Writing Programs

Master of Arts and Graduate Certificates in Writing

  • Graduate Certificate in Technical Writing and Digital Communication

Working professionals know today’s marketplace demands the ability to write well, particularly using digital platforms. Employers value writers who communicate clearly in a professional setting. Our graduate degrees will enhance your existing credentials, preparing you for advancement in many career options.

Middle Georgia State offers two  fully online  graduate programs in technical writing:

  • Master of Arts in Technical and Professional Writing This 30-hour program provides a practical focus on writing and communication skills for today’s technical and professional settings. Upon completion of the MA, students may also earn the Graduate Certificate.
  • Graduate Certificate in Technical Writing and Digital Communication This 15-hour program can be taken as a stand-alone credential, whose completion conveniently provides eligibility to the Master’s program.

Both the Master of Arts in Technical and Professional Writing and the Graduate Certificate are:

  • Fully online
  • Taught in 8-week sessions
  • Designed to complement and extend undergraduate training by developing skills in writing, editing, communication, and web development
  • Interdisciplinary, with course offerings by the Department of English; the Department of Media, Culture, and the Arts; and the School of Information Technology
  • Taught by master teachers and highly experienced writers

The Master of Arts in Technical and Professional Writing is also stackable with two  NEW  fully online Graduate Writing Certificates, beginning in Fall 2023:

  • Graduate Certificate in Creative Writing This 15-hour program can be taken as a stand-alone credential; its classes can be used as electives for the Masters in Technical and Professional Writing
  • Graduate Certificate in Teaching College Writing This 18-hour program can be taken as a stand-alone credential; four of its classes are also requirements or electives for the Masters in Technical and Professional Writing. 
  • Technical Writer
  • Social Media Manager
  • Web Content Editor
  • Instructional Designer
  • Creative Director
  • Non-profit Information Professional
  • Project Manager
  • Office Manager
  • Digital Copywriter
  • Market Research Analyst
  • Brand Strategist
  • Corporate Blogger
  • Small Business Owner
  • Government Information Officer
  • Municipal Information Officer
  • Master of Arts in Technical and Professional Writing

What is the difference between the Graduate Certificate in Technical Writing and Digital Communication and the Master of Arts in Technical and Professional Writing?

The Graduate Certificate is a 15-credit hour program made up of these courses required:

  • ENGL 5106 – Technical Writing in the Digital Age
  • NMAC 5108 – Writing and Publishing in Digital Environments
  • ITEC 5300 – Web Development
  • ITEC 5320 – Instructional Design
  • ENGL 6200 – Grant Writing
  • ITEC 5310 – Human Computer Interaction

The Master of Arts program includes all the certificate courses above; ENGL 5106, NMAC 5108, ITEC 5300, ITEC 5320, and ENGL 6200 are required for the MA, with ITEC 5310 as a possible elective.  The MA adds 5 additional courses for a total of 30 credit hours:

  • ENGL 5206 – Public and Professional Writing
  • ENGL 5650 – Theory and Practice in Editing and Style
  • ENGL 6200 – Grant Writing (also certificate elective; required in MA)
  • COMM 5000 – Rhetoric:  Written, Visual, and Oral Communication
  • 2 of a variety of elective courses (which includes ITEC 5310)

What electives can be students choose in the Master of Arts in Technical and Professional Writing?

Students in the Masters in Technical and Professional Writing program can choose from a wide variety of electives to fulfill their two elective classes.  These include:

  • ITEC 5310 – Human Computer Interaction (also a certificate elective)
  • COMM 6610 Social Media Communication and Advertising
  • CRWR 5040 Fiction Writing
  • CRWR 5050 Poetry Writing
  • CRWR 5440 Screenwriting 
  • CRWR 5700 Narrative Journalism
  • CRWR 5900 Publishing and the Creative Writer
  • ENGL 5990 Graduate Internship
  • ENGL 6100 Seminar in Landmark Reports and Papers
  • ENGL 6300 Teaching First Year Composition
  • ENGL 6400 Teaching Developmental Writing
  • ENGL 6500 Teaching Online Research and Writing
  • MCOM 5010 Public Relations Writing and Research
  • MCOM 5030 Crisis Communication
  • MCOM 5131 News Writing and Reporting
  • MCOM 6000 Production and Design for Public Relations

Can I complete one technical writing program without the other?

Absolutely. Both the Graduate Certificate in Technical Writing and Digital Communication are stand-alone graduate credentials.

Can I complete both technical writing programs?

Yes. A number of students have completed both degrees.

Students who complete the Graduate Certificate in Technical Writing and Digital Communication may then apply to the Master’s program. Their completed courses will count toward the Master of Arts in Technical and Professional Writing. For this option, contact the Graduate Coordinator.

Students in the Masters of Arts in Technical and Professional Writing may also choose to graduate with both the MA and the Graduate Certificate in Technical Writing and Digital Communication, completing course work simultaneously. For this option, contact the Graduate Coordinator after your admission to the MA.  We encourage all MA students to add this certificate to their program of study.

If I am admitted to the Master’s program, can I complete only the Graduate Certificate in Technical Writing and Digital Communication?

Definitely. Admitted M.A. students can still earn the certificate whether or not they complete the M.A. curriculum, as long as they complete the required Graduate Certificate course work. Students wishing to move from the MA program to the Graduate Certificate program should contact the Graduate Coordinator for more details.

Can I later add on other MGA Graduate Writing Programs, such as the Graduate Certificates in Creative Writing or Teaching College English?  Or move into those programs after completing the MA?

MGA’s School of Arts and Letters offers “stackable” graduate programs. Students can be enrolled in up to two graduate programs at a time. In fact, we encourage all MA students to add the Graduate Certificate in Technical Writing and Digital Communication, as you can earn both credentials with no additional coursework.

The Graduate Certificate in Creative Writing contains courses that can be used as electives in the MA in Technical and Professional Writing; the Graduate Certificate in Teaching College Writing includes courses also required in the MA and that can be used as electives. These courses will transfer directly into the certificate programs. Please contact the graduate coordinator for further details.

Any testing requirements for admission?

We do not require admissions exams for acceptance into the Master of Arts in Technical and Professional Writing or the Graduate Certificate in Technical Writing and Digital Communication.

Financial aid available?

While federal financial aid is available for the M.A., it is not currently available for the certificate. However, we do offer Graduate Certificate students other financing options such as Nelnet payment plans , alternative loans , tuition assistance programs (TAP), and third-party scholarships.

Are letters of recommendation required?

Letters of recommendation are not required for either the Master of Arts in Technical and Professional Writing or the Graduate Certificate in Technical Writing and Digital Communication.

What is “evidence of aptitude for success in graduate-level studies”?

A graduate admissions committee determines aptitude for success by reviewing applicants’ official transcript(s) and statement of interest. No additional materials beyond those indicated in the application instructions are required.

If I do not meet the GPA requirement, can I still apply?

Applicants with undergraduate GPA between 2.5 and 2.75 cannot be admitted straight into the Master of Arts program, but they can be admitted to the certificate program. On completion of the Graduate Certificate, these students would then be eligible for entry into the Master’s program.

Applicants who do not meet the 2.5 GPA threshold cannot be admitted into the Graduate Certificate or the M.A. program. Students may enroll in MGA’s undergraduate Professional Writing (PFWR) courses as transient students to raise their GPA and gain valuable related instruction that will equip them well for the graduate program if/when they are admitted.

Do the Master’s and Graduate Certificate programs start only in fall semester?

Not so. Admitted students may begin either program in fall, spring, or summer semester.

Do I need to live in Georgia or near Macon?

Not at all. Both programs are fully online. We do have students from across Georgia, but also students from as far away as Pennsylvania, Texas, and Oregon.

Are there application deadlines?

Yes. Check application deadlines by program here:  https://www.mga.edu/graduate-admissions/programs/index.php  

However, we review applications on a rolling basis and will make every attempt to review an application that comes in after a deadline.

How do I apply?

Detailed information is available by program at:  https://www.mga.edu/graduate-admissions/programs/index.php

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2024 Best Online Masters in New Media Degree Programs

A new media masters degree program blends artistic storytelling with the latest digital technologies. New media artists use a variety of digital tools to communicate with audiences and tell immersive stories.

Best Online Masters in New Media Degree Programs

New media encompasses any form of communication that is delivered digitally to audiences and features multimodal elements, such as images and text. Professionals in this field can work with many forms of media, including animation, blogs, podcasts, social media, and streaming video.

Editorial Listing ShortCode:

If you want to combine a passion for the arts with advanced technical skills, you may benefit from enrolling in a new media masters degree program.

Universities Offering Online Masters in New Media Degree Program

Methodology: The following school list is in alphabetical order. To be included, a college or university must be regionally accredited and offer degree programs online or in a hybrid format.

Arkansas State University

Arkansas State University offers an online program for an MS in Media Management with a Digital Management track. The program is fully online. The MS requires 30 credit hours and can potentially be completed in just 1 year. The curriculum consists of classes like Interactive Advertising, Social Media Measurement, and Audience Market Analysis

Arkansas State University is accredited by the Higher Learning Commission.

Ball State University

Ball State University offers an MA in Emerging Media Design and Development that can be earned in a low-residency degree program, meaning most of it can be completed online. Students are required to meet in Indianapolis for the first 5 days of every semester. Students in the program may also earn a graduate certificate.

Ball State is accredited by the Higher Learning Commission.

Kent State University

Kent State University offers an MS in Emerging Media and Technology (EMAT). The program teaches a blend of technical skills along with soft skills. The EMAT is a hybrid degree and typically takes 12 to 24 months to complete. To graduate, students must submit a culminating project or thesis during their final semester. Kent State University is accredited by the Higher Learning Commission.

Loyola University – Maryland

Students can earn an MA in Emerging Media from Loyola University Maryland. The program offers a specialization in Health Communication. The program is entirely online, and classes are asynchronous. Students can take courses part- time or full-time. To graduate, they must complete 33 credit hours. It typically takes between 12 and 15 months to complete program.

Loyola University – Maryland is accredited by the Middle States Commission on Higher Education.

Notre Dame of Maryland University

Notre Dame of Maryland University offers an MA in Contemporary Communication that can be earned entirely online.

NDMU’s online program has rolling admission, so accepted students can start throughout the year. The program’s faculty members are well-versed in new media and communication. The program requires the completion of 36 credit hours. The curriculum consists of classes like Approaches to Contemporary Communication.

Notre Dame of Maryland University is accredited by the Middle States Commission on Higher Education.

Southern New Hampshire University

Southern New Hampshire University offers a Master’s in Communication that can be earned online. Students can choose a concentration in New Media and Marketing or Public Relations. The program requires the completion of 36 credit hours, which can potentially be done in just 15 months. The curriculum consists of courses like Communication, Media, and Society and Digital Tools and Teams.

Southern New Hampshire University is accredited by the New England Commission of Higher Education.

SUNY Empire State College

SUNY Empire State College offers an MA in Learning and Emerging Technologies. The program is intended for those who want to pursue careers in which they will teach others about emerging technology. For the master’s program, students must complete 36 credits, including nine capstone credits. Students can choose from six concentrations, including Instructional Design or STEM Education and Emerging Technologies.

SUNY Empire State College is accredited by the Middle States Commission on Higher  Education.

The New School

The media studies department of The New School offers an MA in Media Studies. The curriculum is designed to teach students how to create and analyze media. The program can be taken fully online and requires the completion of 39 credit hours. Students can potentially finish in 2 years when attending full-time. The program has start dates in the fall and spring.

The New School  is accredited by the Middle States Commission on Higher Education.

University of Georgia

The University of Georgia offers an MA in Journalism and Mass Communication with a concentration in Emerging Media. The program is fully online and begins each May. To graduate, students must complete 33 credit hours. They may complete the courses over 3 or 6 semesters but must stay on their chosen track.

The University of Georgia is accredited by the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Commission on Colleges.

University of Tampa

Students at the University of Tampa may earn an MS in Social and Emerging Media. Courses are 6 to 7 weeks long, and two sessions are offered each semester. To graduate, students must complete five core courses, two electives, and a senior capstone project. The program can potentially be completed in just 1 year.

The University of Tampa is accredited by the Commission on Colleges of the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools.

Online New Media Masters Degree Programs

Woman taking Online New Media Masters Degree

New media is a multidisciplinary field that blends artistic approaches with digital methodologies. An online new media studies degree incorporates practices and theories from communication, computer science, public relations, and other disciplines.

Pursuing a masters degree in new media can help you learn how to craft interactive stories and use cutting-edge digital tools to communicate with audiences. Technology evolves rapidly, so you can continually expand your knowledge and skills as you practice new types of digital communication.

What is the difference between new and old media? Old, or traditional, media includes decades-old forms of communication, like billboards, broadcast television, and print newspapers. While both new and old media convey information to audiences, new media:

  • Can be more affordable than old media
  • Consists of Internet-based forms of communication
  • Features interactive elements
  • Has an international reach
  • Often targets specific audiences
  • Uses data to measure its effectiveness

A graduate degree related to old media often focuses narrowly on a single mode, like film or print journalism. A new media master’s degree can enable you to learn about multiple constantly evolving forms of digital communication.

While pursuing a master’s in new media, you can explore a variety of interesting topics, such as:

  • Digital storytelling
  • Evolution of digital culture
  • Multimodal communication strategies
  • How class, gender, and race influence how people access new media
  • Legal issues in new media
  • Social network analysis
  • User experience

Professionals with a background in new media studies can go on to pursue a range of careers, such as:

  • Advertising or marketing manager
  • Digital artist
  • Web designer
  • Community college professor
  • Freelance editor or writer
  • Internet broadcasters
  • News reporter
  • Public relations specialist
  • Social media coordinator
  • Visual storyteller

If you want to position yourself for a career that allows you to flex your creativity and digital skills, a masters in new media could be a strategic degree path.

New Media Technology Careers & Salaries

New Media Technology Careers & Salaries

New media includes many different communication methods, so a masters degree in this field can open up a broad assortment of career opportunities.

Depending on your interests and the subjects that you study during your graduate program, you may find employment in a number of new media areas, such as marketing, public relations, or digital communication. Graduates may also pursue positions related to animation, web design, content creation, new media journalism, or software development.

The communication and digital skills that you gain during your graduate studies can also help you find employment in a variety of settings. Graduates might work in corporations, healthcare facilities, federal or state government agencies, or nonprofit organizations. Some new media professionals also work for consulting agencies or as self-employed freelancers. 

According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics , here’s a selection of careers, along with their median salaries, that are related to new media.

The Bureau of Labor Statistics projects that many of these jobs will have positive outlooks over the next ten years. Careers expected to have faster-than-average job growth include web developers and digital designers (23% job growth), software developers (26%), marketing managers (10%), photographers (9%), and public relations managers (8%).

Your potential career opportunities and potential salary will depend on a variety of factors. For example, your artistic skills, industry, location, past job experience, and portfolio can all impact the kind of new media position you can secure.

You may be able to improve your chances of entering a preferred career path by selecting an online master’s program that helps you develop a strong portfolio and offers classes in your areas of interest.

MA in New Media Curriculum & Courses

People taking MA in New Media, in a group study

Masters in new media degree programs offer a variety of courses that help you develop sophisticated artistic and technical skills. You can also learn about advanced communication and marketing methods and theories.

Each graduate program has unique course offerings, but you may have the opportunity to take classes similar to these:

  • Content Creation : You’ll learn how to create a series of multimodal and visual projects for social media and websites.
  • Digital News Production : This course covers approaches and theoretical frameworks for online newsrooms and websites.
  • Emerging Media and Design Theory : Through a series of real-world problems, you’ll learn approaches to design thinking and produce solutions to improve digital communication.
  • Emerging Media Capstone : With the guidance of an advisor, you’ll research and present on a subject related to new media.
  • Exploring Digital Culture : This class examines how digital platforms and technologies shape culture, the economy, politics, social relationships, and other facets of contemporary society.
  • Legal Aspects of Media : This course investigates ethical and legal issues raised by Internet-based media, such as libel and privacy concerns.
  • Social Network Analysis : You’ll study core concepts in social network analysis and learn about how social media users share and interact with information online.
  • Transmedia Storytelling and Publishing : You’ll analyze theories and tools related to cross-media stories.
  • Usability and Evaluation Research Methods : This course teaches you data analysis, usability principles, and other evaluative research methods that you can apply to digital communication content.
  • Writing for Interactive Media : You’ll learn how to create interactive narrative stories using a variety of digital and visual media.

If you hope to study specific subjects in new media, you may find it helpful to research each school’s course catalog and degree requirements to find the best fit for your interests.

Admissions Requirements

Man preparing requirements for Masters in New Media Degree

All new media graduate programs have unique admissions requirements, but many schools require the submission of similar materials.

Typical admissions criteria include:

  • Letters of recommendation
  • Bachelor’s degree in communication, computer science, or a relevant field
  • GRE scores (only some schools require them)
  • Personal statement about your academic goals and professional experience
  • Resume and portfolio

You may increase your chances of acceptance if you strategically tailor your personal statement, portfolio, and resume to address each program’s unique curriculum and strengths.

New Media Graduate Programs Accreditation

University offering Masters in New Media Degree

When comparing prospective new media graduate programs, regional accreditation is one criterion that you can use to evaluate the quality of education provided by each school. During the accreditation process, schools seek verification from outside agencies that assess whether they’ve met predetermined standards of excellence.

Employers often seek graduates from accredited schools because they know that they’ve received a quality education. Obtaining an accredited graduate degree can also help you pursue additional education opportunities later. You can visit the Council for Higher Education Accreditation (CHEA) to view a list of verified schools.

Financial Aid and Scholarships

 Masters in New Media Financial Aid

If you’re concerned about paying for a new media master’s degree, you can explore financial aid options that may reduce the upfront costs of graduate studies.

Colleges may provide scholarships and tuition waivers for select students. You can see if you qualify for grants and student loans offered by federal and state governments. You may also pursue an on-campus work-study position. If you’re currently employed and plan to work throughout graduate school, you may be eligible for professional development grants or scholarships offered by your employer.

You can also search for grant opportunities related to your areas of interest, such as scholarships provided by professional organizations in animation or marketing. You can visit the Federal Student Aid website to learn more about financial aid resources.

What Is an Emerging Media Masters Degree?

 Digital Designers working in their office

An emerging media masters degree is an interdisciplinary program that examines emerging digital technologies from a social science perspective.

This field draws on concepts and theories from data analysis, human behavior, strategic communication, user experience analysis, and other areas. Masters in emerging media programs have many similarities to new media graduate programs. Both degrees will teach you to analyze and create media by using cutting-edge digital technologies.

A new media masters degree typically emphasizes the artistic side of digital communication. By contrast, an emerging media masters degree places more emphasis on investigating digital media using social science methods.

What Skills Will I Learn in New Media?

During your new media studies, you will take courses on a variety of subjects, such as:

  • Advertising
  • Cross-media narratives
  • Digital culture
  • Ethics and new media
  • Interactive storytelling
  • Online content creation
  • Public relations
  • Visual communication

These graduate courses can help you learn marketable skills, such as:

  • Collaboration
  • Communication
  • Digital marketing
  • Graphic design
  • Public speaking
  • Social media management
  • Video editing

You can apply these versatile skills to many different career paths, potentially expanding your employment opportunities.

What Can You Do with an Emerging Media Masters Degree?

Special Effects Artists discussing a project

After graduating with an emerging media masters degree, you may qualify for a variety of positions, depending on your specialty area and prior work experience.

Many professionals focus on the creative side of new media. They might produce digital content tailored toward specific audiences. For instance, a new media graduate could work for an animation studio to produce educational content or create mobile phone applications for hospital patients.

Your expertise in digital communication may also help you gain a business-centric position. For instance, experienced professionals may work as public relations managers, marketing managers, or advertising and promotions managers.

How Long Does It Take to Get an Online Master Degree in New Media?

Woman pursuing her Masters in New Media online

Master’s in new media degrees typically take 1 to 2 years to complete. The time that it takes you to earn the degree will depend on several factors, including:

  • Number of required credit hours
  • Whether or not the program requires a thesis
  • Your enrollment status

Many new media graduate degrees require 32 to 36 credit hours. If you enroll full-time in a 36 credit hour program and take courses during the summer, you might be able to finish the degree in 1 year. If you need to write a thesis or take classes part-time, you’ll likely take longer to complete the program.

Is a New Media Masters Degree Worth It?

Marketing Manager working on a campaign with the team

Yes, a new media masters degree is worth it for many students. As communication increasingly turns digital and new forms of technology emerge, opportunities for digital communication experts will likely increase.

A graduate degree in new media may make you a competitive candidate for many communication- and technology-related positions. The Bureau of Labor Statistics predicts that many careers related to new media will increase over the next ten years. For instance, employment for web developers, marketing managers, and public relations managers will increase by 30%, 10%, and 8%, respectively.  

Getting Your Masters in New Media Online

Man completing his Masters in New Media online

Much like with an online social media masters , an online master’s program in new media can help you sharpen your artistic, communication, and digital abilities.

This interdisciplinary online digital media degree can allow you to gain expertise in a variety of subjects and technologies. Your versatile skillset may open the door for many rewarding careers related to communication and content creation. If you’re interested in pursuing or advancing a career in new media, you can start your educational journey today by researching accredited universities.

By selecting a program that aligns with your new media interests, you may boost your qualifications for your preferred career path.

masters in digital writing

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Digital Writing Technologies in Higher Education

Theory, Research, and Practice

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  • Otto Kruse   ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0002-8167-5127 0 ,
  • Christian Rapp   ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0001-9494-0914 1 ,
  • Chris M. Anson   ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0002-9799-3111 2 ,
  • Kalliopi Benetos   ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0001-8259-7303 3 ,
  • Elena Cotos   ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0002-2515-9857 4 ,
  • Ann Devitt   ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0003-4572-0362 5 ,
  • Antonette Shibani   ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0003-4619-8684 6

School of Applied Linguistics, Zurich University of Applied Sciences, Winterthur, Switzerland

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School of Management and Law, Center for Innovative Teaching and Learning, Zurich University of Applied Sciences, Winterthur, Switzerland

North carolina state university, raleigh, usa, tecfa, faculty of psychology and educational sciences, university of geneva, geneva, switzerland, english department, iowa state university, ames, usa, school of education, trinity college dublin, dublin, ireland, td school, university of technology sydney, sydney, australia.

  • Covers the advancements of 40 years of digital writing with precise descriptions of more than 20 key technologies
  • Makes the state of the art in writing technology and its development accessible for both researchers and practitioners
  • Discusses the implications of technological advancements for writing theory and practice
  • Is open access, which means free and unlimited access

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About this book

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Table of contents (30 chapters)

Front matter, word processing software, the beginnings of word processing: a historical account.

  • Till A. Heilmann

Word Processing Software: The Rise of MS Word

  • Otto Kruse, Christian Rapp

Beyond MS Word: Alternatives and Developments

  • Christian Rapp, Till Heilmann, Otto Kruse

Web Applications and Platform Technology

Hypertext, hyperlinks, and the world wide web.

  • Susan Lang, Craig Baehr

Creativity Software and Idea Mapping Technology

  • Otto Kruse, Christian Rapp, Kalliopi Benetos

Digital Tools for Written Argumentation

Kalliopi Benetos

Digital Note-Taking for Writing

  • Joanna Pitura

Synchronous and Asynchronous Collaborative Writing

  • Montserrat Castelló, Otto Kruse, Christian Rapp, Mike Sharples

Social Annotation: Promising Technologies and Practices in Writing

  • Justin Hodgson, Jeremiah Kalir, Christopher D. Andrews

Multimodal Chat-Based Apps: Enhancing Copresence When Writing

  • Tracey Bowen, Carl Whithaus

Learning Management Systems (LMSs)

Teacher feedback tools.

Chris M. Anson

Digital Student Peer Review Programs

Reference management systems.

  • Antje Proske, Christina Wenzel, Manuela Barbara Queitsch

Plagiarism Detection and Intertextuality Software

  • Chris M. Anson, Otto Kruse

The Electronic Portfolio: Self-Regulation and Reflective Practice

  • Gerd Bräuer, Christine Ziegelbauer

Content Management System 3.0: Emerging Digital Writing Workspaces

  • Lance Cummings
  • Digital writing
  • Word processors
  • Writing analytics
  • Writing tools
  • Writing theory
  • Computer-assisted writing
  • Higher education
  • author roles
  • collaborative writing

Christian Rapp

Elena Cotos

Antonette Shibani

Otto Kruse is a retired professor at the Zurich University of Applied Sciences. He received his doctoral degree and habilitation from the Technical University of Berlin and is specialized in the teaching and research of academic writing. He was and is involved in several international research projects exploring writing in European higher education and currently is focusing on digital writing, for instance, by developing Thesis Writer, a tool supporting dissertation writers.

Christian Rapp is leading the Educational Technology Team at the Center for Innovative Teaching and Learning, School of Management and Law, Zurich University of Applied Sciences. He is a coordinator of several international R&D projects funded by EU and Swiss National Science Foundation. He specializes in writing technology and is a fellow of the Digitalization Initiative of the Zurich Higher Education Institutions.

Chris Anson is Distinguished University Professor and Executive Director of the Campus Writing and Speaking Program at North Carolina State University. He has published extensively in the field of writing studies and has spoken and consulted widely across the United States and several dozen other countries. He is the past chair of the Conference on College Composition and Communication and past president of the Council of Writing Program Administrators, and is currently Chair of the International Society for the Advancement of Writing Research. His professional summary can be found at www.ansonica.net.

Kalliopi Benetos is a senior researcher and lecturer in educational technology at the University of Geneva's Faculty of Psychology and Educational Sciences, where she teaches courses in HCI and digital fabrication. She uses design-based research approaches to develop and study instructional designs and digital environments to support critical and epistemic thinking and learning through argumentation and has published multiple papers in the domain of technology-mediated learning and instruction.

Elena Cotos is an associate professor of applied linguistics, director of the Center for Communication Excellence, and associate dean for professional development at Iowa State University. Her research bridges corpus-based analysis of academic discourse, genre-based automated evaluation of scientific writing, and computer-assisted language learning. She has led design, research, and evaluation projects focused on intelligent writing technology and also developed massive open online writing-related courses sponsored by the US Department of State.

Ann Devitt is an associate professor in language education at the School of Education and Fellow at Trinity College Dublin.  She is Academic Director for Learnovate, the Enterprise Ireland funded centre of excellence for educational technology which is hosted in Trinity College Dublin. Her research interests lie in the use of technology in education, in particular for language and literacy learning. 

Antonette Shibani is a lecturer and researcher at the TD (TransDisciplinary) School, University of Technology Sydney. She researches the use of learning analytics and artificial intelligence tools to improve educational practice with a special focus on writing technologies. Shibani has served on the executive committee of the Society for Learning Analytics Research and founded its special interest group on Writing Analytics.

Book Title : Digital Writing Technologies in Higher Education

Book Subtitle : Theory, Research, and Practice

Editors : Otto Kruse, Christian Rapp, Chris M. Anson, Kalliopi Benetos, Elena Cotos, Ann Devitt, Antonette Shibani

DOI : https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-031-36033-6

Publisher : Springer Cham

eBook Packages : Education , Education (R0)

Copyright Information : The Editor(s) (if applicable) and The Author(s) 2023

Hardcover ISBN : 978-3-031-36032-9 Published: 16 September 2023

Softcover ISBN : 978-3-031-36035-0 Published: 14 September 2023

eBook ISBN : 978-3-031-36033-6 Published: 14 September 2023

Edition Number : 1

Number of Pages : XXV, 526

Number of Illustrations : 2 b/w illustrations, 23 illustrations in colour

Topics : Writing Skills , Language Education , Education, general , Literacy

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    Through Asbury University's digital storytelling program, you'll learn how to use these technologies, how to create and package stories that will captivate your audiences and how to support your work with solid research and analytics. This program is designed to help you master a wide range of media skills, from content writing to social ...

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    The Digital Studies program at the University of Chicago responds to the growing demand for academic rigor in the loosely defined field of digital humanities and the need to certify technical competence in this area. The program equips students of the humanities to pursue careers that utilize their skills in research, writing, and critical ...

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    The Digital Media M.A. combines theory and practice to train the next generation of interactive media scholars and practitioners. The program emphasizes the tools and techniques of both interactive aesthetics and computation, and provides you with access to state-of-the-art facilities through the Maker Space lab, equipped with items such as 3D ...

  7. 2024 Best Online Masters in Creative Writing Programs

    Saint Leo University offers an MFA in Creative Writing program online but with 3 required summer residencies, each lasting 1 week. The program typically offers concentrations in Fiction, Poetry, and Nonfiction. The program requires the completion of 36 credit hours and the writing of a book-length thesis.

  8. Online Master's Degree

    As an online master's student, you'll collaborate with instructors and peers from all over the globe. We keep our classes small—writing courses are capped at 13 students, multimedia at 10. This allows for copious amounts of face time with professors and fellow students. Professors offer intensive feedback on every assignment.

  9. Creative Writing and Literature Master's Degree Program

    Through the master's degree in creative writing and literature, you'll hone your skills as a storyteller — crafting publishable original scripts, novels, and stories. In small, workshop-style classes, you'll master key elements of narrative craft, including characterization, story and plot structure, point of view, dialogue, and ...

  10. Graduate Publishing and Writing (MA)

    Housed in the Department of Writing, Literature and Publishing in the School of the Arts, our program allows you to explore all facets of publishing in the publishing hub of Boston. Our experienced faculty provide a comprehensive overview of the publishing of books and magazine media via print, digital, video, social media, and other platforms.

  11. MA Rhetoric, Writing, and Digital Media

    The Master of Arts in English - Rhetoric, Writing, and Digital Media Studies provides quality learning opportunities for students who wish to teach writing or who teach in K-12, college, or specialized settings; who are interested in language, literacy, and learning in contemporary society; and who intend to focus on educational, community, or workplace literacy programs.

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    Graduate students in Brown's Literary Arts MFA program may choose to focus in one of three tracks - Fiction, Poetry, or Digital/Cross Disciplinary Writing. The Graduate School has notified candidates regarding admission decisions for Fall 2024 in all three tracks: Cross-Disciplinary, Fiction and Poetry.

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    Why Choose Our Master's in Digital Content Design Online Graduate Program? ... Master of Arts (MA) Professional Writing ' Next Start Date: May 13, 2024. View Degree. Master of Arts (MA)

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    The professional graduate certificate in digital storytelling requires four 4-credit courses, or 16 credits. You may choose from the following course groups, using the certificate course search. Journalism (choose two courses from select group) Digital communication (choose two courses from select group) Courses taken before the 2018-2019 ...

  16. Why Digital Writing Matters in Education

    Thankfully, there are some good educational resources available. The National Writing Project recently published Because Digital Writing Matters: Improving Student Writing in Online and Multimedia Environments by Danielle Nicole DeVoss, Elyse Eidman-Aadahl and Troy Hicks. Their book is a good resource for teachers interested in thoughtfully ...

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    Baer goes on to discuss how digital writing is wholly multimodal, and how the incorporation of images, video, and audio not only supplements the author's text, but also "interact with one another to create new meanings and multiple potential interpretations" (Baer 2013). The definition of digital writing can be expanded further.

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  23. Colleges adding digital literacy as graduation requirement

    As concerns mount about online misinformation, AI-created images and the ethics of the digital landscape, several institutions are requiring courses in digital media literacy. Universities spent the late 1990s and early 2000s ensuring students could attach documents to email, fill out spreadsheets and perform other basic computer skills. But the information age has led to a changing of the ...