MLA 8 Citation Guide

  • TITLE of SOURCE
  • TITLE of CONTAINER
  • OTHER CONTRIBUTORS
  • PUBLICATION DATE
  • Works Cited
  • Journal Article with One Author
  • Journal Article with 2 Authors
  • Journal Article with 3 or more Authors
  • Magazine Article
  • Newspaper Article
  • One Author or Editor
  • Two Authors or Editors
  • Three or More Authors
  • Article or Chapter in an Edited Book
  • Article in a Reference Book
  • Reference Work
  • Basic Web Page
  • Entry in a Reference Work
  • Government or Agency Document
  • YouTube Video
  • Electronic Image
  • Figures and Charts
  • Class Lecture/Notes
  • Secondary Sources

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Blog and Tweets

Editor, screen name, author, or compiler name (if available). “Posting Title.”  Name of Site , Version number (if available), Name of institution/organization affiliated with the site (sponsor or publisher), URL. Date of access.

Salmar1515 [Sal Hernandez]. “Re: Best Strategy: Fenced Pastures vs. Max Number of Rooms?” BoardGameGeek, 29 Sept. 2008, boardgamegeek.com/thread/343929/best-strategy-fenced-pastures-vs-max-number-rooms . Accessed 5 Apr. 2018.

@tombrokaw. "SC demonstrated why all the debates are the engines of this campaign."  Twitter,  22 Jan. 2018, 3:06 a.m., twitter.com/tombrokaw/status/160996868971704320.

@PurdueWLab. "Spring break is around the corner, and all our locations will be open next week."  Twitter , 5 Mar. 2017, 12:58 p.m., twitter.com/PurdueWLab/status/176728308736737282.

Citing Web Resources

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MLA Works Cited: Electronic Sources (Web Publications)

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Copyright ©1995-2018 by The Writing Lab & The OWL at Purdue and Purdue University. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, reproduced, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed without permission. Use of this site constitutes acceptance of our terms and conditions of fair use.

MLA (Modern Language Association) style is most commonly used to write papers and cite sources within the liberal arts and humanities. This resource, updated to reflect the MLA Handbook (9 th ed.), offers examples for the general format of MLA research papers, in-text citations, endnotes/footnotes, and the Works Cited page.

The MLA Handbook highlights principles over prescriptive practices. Essentially, a writer will need to take note of primary elements in every source, such as author, title, etc. and then assort them in a general format. Thus, by using this methodology, a writer will be able to cite any source regardless of whether it’s included in this list.

However, this guide will highlight a few concerns when citing digital sources in MLA style.

Best Practices for Managing Online Sources

Because online information can change or disappear, it is always a good idea to keep personal copies of important electronic information whenever possible. Downloading or even printing key documents ensures you have a stable backup. You can also use the Bookmark function in your web browser in order to build an easy-to-access reference for all of your project's sources (though this will not help you if the information is changed or deleted).

It is also wise to keep a record of when you first consult with each online source. MLA uses the phrase, “Accessed” to denote which date you accessed the web page when available or necessary. It is not required to do so, but it is encouraged (especially when there is no copyright date listed on a website).

Important Note on the Use of URLs in MLA

Include a URL or web address to help readers locate your sources. Because web addresses are not static (i.e., they change often) and because documents sometimes appear in multiple places on the web (e.g., on multiple databases), MLA encourages the use of citing containers such as Youtube, JSTOR, Spotify, or Netflix in order to easily access and verify sources. However, MLA only requires the www. address, so eliminate all https:// when citing URLs.

Many scholarly journal articles found in databases include a DOI (digital object identifier). If a DOI is available, cite the DOI number instead of the URL.

Online newspapers and magazines sometimes include a “permalink,” which is a shortened, stable version of a URL. Look for a “share” or “cite this” button to see if a source includes a permalink. If you can find a permalink, use that instead of a URL.

Abbreviations Commonly Used with Electronic Sources

If page numbers are not available, use par. or pars. to denote paragraph numbers. Use these in place of the p. or pp. abbreviation. Par. would be used for a single paragraph, while pars. would be used for a span of two or more paragraphs.

Basic Style for Citations of Electronic Sources (Including Online Databases)

Here are some common features you should try to find before citing electronic sources in MLA style. Not every web page will provide all of the following information. However, collect as much of the following information as possible:

  • Author and/or editor names (if available); last names first.
  • "Article name in quotation marks."
  • Title of the website, project, or book in italics.
  • Any version numbers available, including editions (ed.), revisions, posting dates, volumes (vol.), or issue numbers (no.).
  • Publisher information, including the publisher name and publishing date.
  • Take note of any page numbers (p. or pp.) or paragraph numbers (par. or pars.).
  • DOI (if available, precede it with "https://doi.org/"), otherwise a URL (without the https://) or permalink.
  • Date you accessed the material (Date Accessed). While not required, saving this information it is highly recommended, especially when dealing with pages that change frequently or do not have a visible copyright date.

Use the following format:

Author. "Title." Title of container (self contained if book) , Other contributors (translators or editors), Version (edition), Number (vol. and/or no.), Publisher, Publication Date, Location (pages, paragraphs and/or URL, DOI or permalink). 2 nd container’s title , Other contributors, Version, Number, Publisher, Publication date, Location, Date of Access (if applicable).

Citing an Entire Web Site

When citing an entire website, follow the same format as listed above, but include a compiler name if no single author is available.

Author, or compiler name (if available). Name of Site. Version number (if available), Name of institution/organization affiliated with the site (sponsor or publisher), date of resource creation (if available), DOI (preferred), otherwise include a URL or permalink. Date of access (if applicable).

Editor, author, or compiler name (if available). Name of Site . Version number, Name of institution/organization affiliated with the site (sponsor or publisher), date of resource creation (if available), URL, DOI or permalink. Date of access (if applicable).

The Purdue OWL Family of Sites . The Writing Lab and OWL at Purdue and Purdue U, 2008, owl.english.purdue.edu/owl. Accessed 23 Apr. 2008.

Felluga, Dino. Guide to Literary and Critical Theory . Purdue U, 28 Nov. 2003, www.cla.purdue.edu/english/theory/. Accessed 10 May 2006.

Course or Department Websites

Give the instructor name. Then list the title of the course (or the school catalog designation for the course) in italics. Give appropriate department and school names as well, following the course title.

Felluga, Dino. Survey of the Literature of England . Purdue U, Aug. 2006, web.ics.purdue.edu/~felluga/241/241/Home.html. Accessed 31 May 2007.

English Department . Purdue U, 20 Apr. 2009, www.cla.purdue.edu/english/. Accessed 31 May 2015.

A Page on a Web Site

For an individual page on a Web site, list the author or alias if known, followed by an indication of the specific page or article being referenced. Usually, the title of the page or article appears in a header at the top of the page. Follow this with the information covered above for entire Web sites. If the publisher is the same as the website name, only list it once.

Lundman, Susan. “How to Make Vegetarian Chili.”  eHow , www.ehow.com/how_10727_make-vegetarian-chili.html. Accessed 6 July 2015.

“ Athlete's Foot - Topic Overview. ”   WebMD , 25 Sept. 2014, www.webmd.com/skin-problems-and-treatments/tc/athletes-foot-topic-overview.

Citations for e-books closely resemble those for physical books. Simply indicate that the book in question is an e-book by putting the term "e-book" in the "version" slot of the MLA template (i.e., after the author, the title of the source, the title of the container, and the names of any other contributors).

Silva, Paul J.  How to Write a Lot: A Practical Guide to Productive Academic Writing. E-book, American Psychological Association, 2007.

If the e-book is formatted for a specific reader device or service, you can indicate this by treating this information the same way you would treat a physical book's edition number. Often, this will mean replacing "e-book" with "[App/Service] ed."

Machiavelli, Niccolo.  The Prince , translated by W. K. Marriott, Kindle ed., Library of Alexandria, 2018.

Note:  The MLA considers the term "e-book" to refer to publications formatted specifically for reading with an e-book reader device (e.g., a Kindle) or a corresponding web application. These e-books will not have URLs or DOIs. If you are citing book content from an ordinary webpage with a URL, use the "A Page on a Web Site" format above.

An Image (Including a Painting, Sculpture, or Photograph)

Provide the artist's name, the work of art italicized, the date of creation, the institution and city where the work is housed. Follow this initial entry with the name of the Website in italics, and the date of access.

Goya, Francisco. The Family of Charles IV . 1800. Museo Nacional del Prado, Madrid. Museo Nacional del Prado , www.museodelprado.es/en/the-collection/art-work/the-family-of-carlos-iv/f47898fc-aa1c-48f6-a779-71759e417e74. Accessed 22 May 2006.

Klee, Paul. Twittering Machine . 1922. Museum of Modern Art, New York. The Artchive , www.artchive.com/artchive/K/klee/twittering_machine.jpg.html. Accessed May 2006.

If the work cited is available on the web only, then provide the name of the artist, the title of the work, and then follow the citation format for a website. If the work is posted via a username, use that username for the author.

Adams, Clifton R. “People Relax Beside a Swimming Pool at a Country Estate Near Phoenix, Arizona, 1928.” Found, National Geographic Creative, 2 June 2016, natgeofound.tumblr.com/.

An Article in a Web Magazine

Provide the author name, article name in quotation marks, title of the web magazine in italics, publisher name, publication date, URL, and the date of access.

Bernstein, Mark. “ 10 Tips on Writing the Living Web. ”   A List Apart: For People Who Make Websites , 16 Aug. 2002, alistapart.com/article/writeliving. Accessed 4 May 2009.

An Article in an Online Scholarly Journal

For all online scholarly journals, provide the author(s) name(s), the name of the article in quotation marks, the title of the publication in italics, all volume and issue numbers, and the year of publication. Include a DOI if available, otherwise provide a URL or permalink to help readers locate the source.

Article in an Online-only Scholarly Journal

MLA requires a page range for articles that appear in Scholarly Journals. If the journal you are citing appears exclusively in an online format (i.e. there is no corresponding print publication) that does not make use of page numbers, indicate the URL or other location information.

Dolby, Nadine. “Research in Youth Culture and Policy: Current Conditions and Future Directions.” Social Work and Society: The International Online-Only Journal, vol. 6, no. 2, 2008, www.socwork.net/sws/article/view/60/362. Accessed 20 May 2009.

Article in an Online Scholarly Journal That Also Appears in Print

Cite articles in online scholarly journals that also appear in print as you would a scholarly journal in print, including the page range of the article . Provide the URL and the date of access.

Wheelis, Mark. “ Investigating Disease Outbreaks Under a Protocol to the Biological and Toxin Weapons Convention. ”   Emerging Infectious Diseases , vol. 6, no. 6, 2000, pp. 595-600, wwwnc.cdc.gov/eid/article/6/6/00-0607_article. Accessed 8 Feb. 2009.

An Article from an Online Database (or Other Electronic Subscription Service)

Cite online databases (e.g. LexisNexis, ProQuest, JSTOR, ScienceDirect) and other subscription services as containers. Thus, provide the title of the database italicized before the DOI or URL. If a DOI is not provided, use the URL instead. Provide the date of access if you wish.

Alonso, Alvaro, and Julio A. Camargo. “ Toxicity of Nitrite to Three Species of Freshwater Invertebrates. ”   Environmental Toxicology, vol. 21, no. 1, 3 Feb. 2006, pp. 90-94. Wiley Online Library , https://doi.org/10.1002/tox.20155. Accessed 26 May 2009.

Langhamer, Claire. “Love and Courtship in Mid-Twentieth-Century England.” Historical Journal, vol. 50, no. 1, 2007, pp. 173-96. ProQuest , https://doi.org/10.1017/S0018246X06005966. Accessed 27 May 2009.

E-mail (including E-mail Interviews)

Give the author of the message, followed by the subject line in quotation marks. State to whom the message was sent with the phrase, “Received by” and the recipient’s name. Include the date the message was sent. Use standard capitalization.

Kunka, Andrew. “ Re: Modernist Literature. ”  Received by John Watts, 15 Nov. 2000.

Neyhart, David. “ Re: Online Tutoring. ” Received by Joe Barbato, 1 Dec. 2016.

A Listserv, Discussion Group, or Blog Posting

Cite web postings as you would a standard web entry. Provide the author of the work, the title of the posting in quotation marks, the web site name in italics, the publisher, and the posting date. Follow with the date of access. Include screen names as author names when author name is not known. If both names are known, place the author’s name in brackets.

Author or compiler name (if available). “Posting Title.” Name of Site , Version number (if available), Name of institution/organization affiliated with the site (sponsor or publisher), URL. Date of access.

Salmar1515 [Sal Hernandez]. “Re: Best Strategy: Fenced Pastures vs. Max Number of Rooms?” BoardGameGeek , 29 Sept. 2008, boardgamegeek.com/thread/343929/best-strategy-fenced-pastures-vs-max-number-rooms. Accessed 5 Apr. 2009.

Begin with the user's Twitter handle in place of the author’s name. Next, place the tweet in its entirety in quotations, inserting a period after the tweet within the quotations. Include the date and time of posting, using the reader's time zone; separate the date and time with a comma and end with a period. Include the date accessed if you deem necessary.

@tombrokaw. “ SC demonstrated why all the debates are the engines of this campaign. ”   Twitter, 22 Jan. 2012, 3:06 a.m., twitter.com/tombrokaw/status/160996868971704320.

@PurdueWLab. “ Spring break is around the corner, and all our locations will be open next week. ”   Twitter , 5 Mar. 2012, 12:58 p.m., twitter.com/PurdueWLab/status/176728308736737282.

A YouTube Video

Video and audio sources need to be documented using the same basic guidelines for citing print sources in MLA style. Include as much descriptive information as necessary to help readers understand the type and nature of the source you are citing. If the author’s name is the same as the uploader, only cite the author once. If the author is different from the uploader, cite the author’s name before the title.

McGonigal, Jane. “Gaming and Productivity.” YouTube , uploaded by Big Think, 3 July 2012, www.youtube.com/watch?v=mkdzy9bWW3E.

“8 Hot Dog Gadgets put to the Test.” YouTube, uploaded by Crazy Russian Hacker, 6 June 2016, www.youtube.com/watch?v=WBlpjSEtELs.

A Comment on a Website or Article

List the username as the author. Use the phrase, Comment on, before the title. Use quotation marks around the article title. Name the publisher, date, time (listed on near the comment), and the URL.

Not Omniscient Enough. Comment on “ Flight Attendant Tells Passenger to ‘Shut Up’ After Argument Over Pasta. ”  ABC News, 9 Jun 2016, 4:00 p.m., abcnews.go.com/US/flight-attendant-tells-passenger-shut-argument-pasta/story?id=39704050.

Citation guides

All you need to know about citations

How to cite a blog post in MLA

MLA blog post citation

To cite a blog post in a reference entry in MLA style 9th edition include the following elements:

  • Author(s) name: Give the last name and name as presented in the source (e. g. Watson, John). For two authors, reverse only the first name, followed by ‘and’ and the second name in normal order (e. g. Watson, John, and John Watson). For three or more authors, list the first name followed by et al. (e. g. Watson, John, et al.)
  • Title of the post: Titles are italicized when independent. If part of a larger source add quotation marks and do not italize.
  • Title of the blog: Container titles are italicized and followed by a comma.
  • Date of posting: Give the day, month and year of publication. All months, excluding June and July, are abbreviated as three letters (e.g. 9 Aug. 2019.)
  • URL: Copy URL in full from your browser, include http:// or https:// and do not list URLs created by shortening services.

Here is the basic format for a reference list entry of a blog post in MLA style 9th edition:

Author(s) name . " Title of the post ." Title of the blog , Date of posting , URL .

Take a look at our works cited examples that demonstrate the MLA style guidelines in action:

A blog post with one author from a popular digital platform

Miller, Shannon . " Google's Change the Game initiative is turning girls into game developers ." Hello Giggles , 11 Dec. 2018 , hellogiggles.com/lifestyle/google-play-change-the-game-girls-gaming/ .

A blog post with one author from a science digital platform

Torres, Phil . " Why We Should Think Twice About Colonizing Space ." Nautilus , 18 Feb. 2019 , nautil.us/blog/-why-we-should-think-twice-about-colonizing-space .

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This citation style guide is based on the MLA Handbook (9 th edition).

More useful guides

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Access Date

For all content found on the Web, you must list the date you first viewed the resource. This comes last in a citation. The exception to this rule is that you do not list access dates for content found in library databases.

A username can be provided in place of a real name. If both username and real name are provided, put the user name first with the real name following in brackets. 

Creator information may often be found under a section called "About" for some types of social media, however this is not always standard.

The format of all dates is: Date Month (shortened) Year. E.g. 5 Sept. 2012.

If no date is given, leave that information out of the citation. 

Note : For your Works Cited list, all citations should be double spaced and have a hanging indent.

A "hanging indent" means that each subsequent line after the first line of your citation should be indented by 0.5 inches.

Author's Last Name, First Name or Username if real name not provided. "Title of Blog Post." Name of Blog,  Blog Network/Publisher if given, Day Month Year of blog post, URL of blog post. Accessed Day Month Year blog was visited.

Host's Last Name, First Name. "Title of Podcast Episode." Title of Overall Podcast , Episode Number if Given, Web Site Hosting If Different From Podcast Title, Day Month Year of Episode, URL of episode. Accessed Day Month Year podcast was downloaded/played.

Streaming Video From a Website (YouTube, Vimeo, Hulu, etc.) - Known Author

Last Name, First Name of video creator or Username of Creator. "Title of Video." Title of the Hosting Website , Day Month Year of Publication, URL of video. Accessed Day Month Year video was viewed.

Streaming Video From a Library Database (Films on Demand)

"Title of Video." Publisher/Production Company, Date. Title of Library Database. 

Twitter (Tweets)

Twitter Handle (First Name Last Name if Known). "The entire tweet word-for-word." Twitter , Day Month Year of Tweet, Time of Tweet, URL.

"Title of Entry." Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia,  Wikimedia Foundation, Day Month Year entry was last modified, Time entry was last modified, URL of entry. Accessed Day Month Year Wikipedia entry was last viewed.

 Note : The date and time the article was last modified appears at the bottom of each Wikipedia article.

Wikipedia may not be considered an acceptable source for a college or university assignment. Be sure to evaluate the content carefully and check your assignment.

Author Last Name, First Name or Account Name. Description of Post. Facebook ,   Day Month Year of Post, Time of Post, URL. Accessed Day Month Year post was viewed.

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Cite a blog in MLA style

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  • Archive material
  • Chapter of an edited book
  • Conference proceedings
  • Dictionary entry
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  • DVD, video, or film
  • E-book or PDF
  • Edited book
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  • Government publication
  • Music or recording
  • Online image or video
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Use the following template or our MLA Citation Generator to cite a blog entry. For help with other source types, like books, PDFs, or websites, check out our other guides. To have your reference list or bibliography automatically made for you, try our free citation generator .

Reference list

Place this part in your bibliography or reference list at the end of your assignment.

In-text citation

Place this part right after the quote or reference to the source in your assignment.

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Home / Guides / Citation Guides / How to Cite Sources / How to Cite a Blog Post in MLA, APA, or Chicago

How to Cite a Blog Post in MLA, APA, or Chicago

As new forms of online communication become acceptable sources in an academic setting, questions regarding proper citation continue to arise. You might be confused about how to cite certain things, but we promise it’s easier than it seems. Luckily, we’ve got you covered as you look to cite a blog post for your next paper (regardless of which citation style you’d like to use).

Quickly cite a blog post by using our online form here .

To cite a blog post, you should make note of the following pieces of informations:

  • The name of the blog the post has been published on
  • The title of the specific post you’re citing
  • The date the post was published
  • The author of the post
  • The publisher of the blog site
  • The URL or direct link to the post

Use the following structure to cite a blog post in MLA 9:

Author’s Last Name, Author’s First Name. “Title of Post.” Blog Name, Publisher (only include this information if it is different than the name of the blog site), date blog post was published, URL. Column or section name (if applicable).

Here’s how the above example would be cited in MLA 9:

Kirschenbaum, Michele. “10 Ways to Spot a Fake News Article.” EasyBib , 4 Jan. 2017, www.easybib.com/guides/10-ways-to-spot-a-fake-news-article/.

Here’s how the above example would be cited in an in-text citation:

(Author’s Last Name)

(Kirschenbaum)

Use the following structure to cite a blog post in APA 7:

Author’s Last Name, First Initial. (Year, Month Day post was published). Title of post. Title of Blog . URL

Here’s how the above example would be cited in APA:

Kirschenbaum, M. (2017, January 4). 10 ways to spot a fake news article. EasyBib Blog. https://www.easybib.com/guides/10-ways-to-spot-a-fake-news-article/

In Chicago, blog posts are generally only cited in the body of a project and also in the footnotes

“In EasyBib’s blog post on January 4th, 2017, the author shares many ways to spot a fake news article….”

  • Michele Kirschenbaum, “10 Ways to Spot a Fake News Article,” EasyBib (blog), January 4, 2017, /10-ways-to-spot-a-fake-news-article/.

If the blog post was used significantly in your project, or if your instructor prefers a full citation in the bibliography, use the following structure:

Author’s Last name, First name. “Title of Blog Post.” Title of Blog (blog), Date, Link to post.

Here’s how the above example would be cited in Chicago:

Kirschenbaum, Michele. “10 Ways to Spot a Fake News Article.” EasyBib (blog), January 4, 2017, /10-ways-to-spot-a-fake-news-article/.

Find more blog examples with these additional guides:

Or use EasyBib linked here to create your citation! We have forms for over 50 source types including blog!

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To add a citation to a blog post without author details, include the following details: Title of the post, Blog name, date of the post, URL.

To add a citation to a blog post with multiple authors’ details, include the following details: Authors’ names, Title of the post, Blog name, date of the post, URL.

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What citation style should I use for my personal blog?

Note: This post relates to content in the eighth edition of the MLA Handbook . For up-to-date guidance, see the ninth edition of the MLA Handbook .

Using MLA style for your personal blog has several advantages:

  • MLA style is reader friendly . It uses in-text citations and avoids bibliographic notes, so the reader won’t have to switch between your prose and notes that appear elsewhere (usually at the bottom of the page but sometimes in online contexts along the side or in hover text).
  • MLA style is focused on people and their work . MLA in-text citations also foreground the humanistic aspects of sources, keying to the author of a work and, when needed for clarity, the title (instead of the date).
  • MLA style is streamlined . Citations are kept to a minimum, and all the reference material is collected in one place: the works-cited list.
  • MLA style allows you to cite any type of source . There are no special rules for different publication formats, just a basic set of principles you can use to cite any source. This is ideal if you want to blog about a range of subjects.

Whatever citation style you choose for your blog, good luck with your project!

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  • Interviews and Emails (Personal Communications)
  • Journal Articles
  • Magazine Articles
  • Newspaper Articles
  • Primary Sources
  • Religious Texts
  • Social Media
  • Videos & DVDs
  • In-Text Citation
  • Works Quoted in Another Source
  • No Author, No Date etc.
  • Works Cited List & Sample Paper
  • Annotated Bibliography
  • Powerpoint Presentations

On This Page: Social Media

Podcast episode.

  • Streaming Video From YouTube, Vimeo, etc.

Twitter (Tweets)

Images posted to twitter, instagram, pinterest, etc., citing two authors, citing three or more authors, abbreviating months.

In your works cited list, abbreviate months as follows: 

January = Jan. February = Feb. March = Mar. April = Apr. May = May June = June July = July August = Aug. September = Sept. October = Oct. November = Nov. December = Dec.

Spell out months fully in the body of your paper. 

A username can be provided in place of a real name. If both username and real name are provided, put the user name first with the real name following in brackets. 

Creator information may often be found under a section called "About" for some types of social media, however this is not always standard.

The format of all dates is: Date Month (shortened) Year. E.g. 5 Sept. 2012.

If no date is given, leave that information out of the citation. 

Errors in Spelling or Grammar in Tweets

In the citation, write out the actual Tweet and keep spelling and grammar the same as in the original, even if there are errors. However, w hen quoting the Tweet in your assignment,  write [sic] in square brackets next to the errors to indicate the errors are not your own.

For example, if the Tweet was written "It isn't you're fault the media is violent", in your assignment, you will write: "It isn't you're [sic] fault the media is violent."

Time Stamps in Audio and Video Recordings

As there are no page numbers in audio and video recordings, include a timestamp instead. Time stamps are given in the following format: 

(Author's Last Name hours:min:seconds-hours:min:seconds) 

If you are citing something that is less than an hour long, you can start with minutes. 

Examples: 

(Smith 01:15-02:20)

(Jones 01:20:15-01:22:22) 

Note : For your Works Cited list, all citations should be double spaced and have a hanging indent.

A "hanging indent" means that each subsequent line after the first line of your citation should be indented by 0.5 inches.

Author's Last Name, First Name or Username if real name not provided. "Title of Blog Post." Name of Blog,  Blog Network/Publisher if given, Day Month Year of blog post, URL of blog post. Accessed Day Month Year blog was visited.

Host's Last Name, First Name, host(s). "Title of Podcast Episode." Title of Overall Podcast , Season Number if given, Episode Number if given, Web Site Hosting if Different From Podcast Title, Day Month Year of Episode, URL of Episode. Accessed Day Month Year podcast was downloaded/played.

Streaming Video From a Website (YouTube, Vimeo, etc.)

Last Name, First Name of video creator or Username of Creator. "Title of Video."  Title of the Hosting Website , uploaded by Username, Day Month Year of Publication, URL of video. Accessed Day Month Year video was viewed.

For more information on citing videos found online, check out the MLA website . 

Screen Name [@handle]. "The entire tweet word-for-word." Twitter , Day Month Year of Tweet, Time of Tweet, URL.

Screen Name [@handle]. Description of image.  Name of Social Media Site , Day Month Year of Tweet, Time of post, URL.

"Title of Entry." Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia,  Wikimedia Foundation, Day Month Year entry was last modified, Time entry was last modified, URL of entry. Accessed Day Month Year Wikipedia entry was last viewed.

 Note : The date and time the article was last modified appears at the bottom of each Wikipedia article.

Keep in mind that Wikipedia may not be considered an acceptable source for a college or university assignment. Be sure to evaluate the content carefully and check with your instructor if you can use it as a source in your assignment.

Author Last Name, First Name or Account Name. Description of Post. Facebook ,   Day Month Year of Post, Time of Post, URL. Accessed Day Month Year post was viewed.

If there are two authors, cite the the authors as follows (list authors in the order they are given on the page, not alphabetically):

Last Name, First Name of First Author, and First Name Last Name of Second Author.

Example: Smith, James, and Sarah Johnston.

If there are three or more authors, cite only the name of the first author listed with their Last Name, First Name Middle Name followed by a comma et al.

Example: Smith, James, et al.

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  • Last Updated: Nov 24, 2023 2:14 PM
  • URL: https://columbiacollege-ca.libguides.com/MLA9

ZSR Library

MLA 8th ed. Style Guide: Web Sites, Blogs

  • Art, Photography, Music
  • Business Resources
  • Dissertations, Theses
  • Emails, Social Media
  • Film, Television, Video
  • Journal, Newspaper, & Magazine Articles
  • Legal Sources
  • Parenthetical (in-text) Citations
  • Web Sites, Blogs
  • Need more help?

On This Page

Book Accessed on the Web

Corporate Authors for Web Sites

Journal Articles Accessed on the Web

News Organization

Essential Elements

In general, a citation for information found on the Web should include the following:

  • Author's name (see Corporate Authors)
  • Title of work or Web page
  • Title of the Web site (if different from the specific work)
  • Version/edition used (if available)
  • Date of publication/last updated 
  • URL, omitting http://
  • Date accessed (if helpful to your reader) Ex. "Accessed 10 Aug. 2016."

Sample Citations - Web Sites

Example 1 :

Levs, Josh. “Working Dads are Leaning In: And Their Companies Should Be, Too.”  	The Huffington Post, 16 June 2016, www.huffingtonpost.com/quora/working-dads-are-leaning_b_10505642.html.

Example 2 (Blog Network) :

Scharf, Caleb A. “3 Cosmic Mysteries: No. 1.” Life, Unbounded, Scientific American  	Blogs, 26 July 2016, blogs.scientificamerican.com/life-unbounded/3-cosmic-mysteries-no-1/.

Example 3 (Comment on Blog) :

John. Comment on “Chewing Gum Can Improve Memory.” Study Skills Blog, 8 Dec. 2007, www.studyskillsblog.com/chewing-gum-can-improve-memory/.

A corporate author may be a government agency, an institution, an association, or other organization.

“Obesity.” Medline Plus, National Library of Medicine, United States, 21 July 2016,  	medlineplus.gov/obesity.html.

Example 2 :

If the title of the web site is the same as the name of the publisher, there is no need to include additional publisher information. 

"Genetics of Diabetes." American Diabetes Association, 20 May 2014, diabetes.org/diabetes-basics/genetics-of-diabetes.html.

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  • Last Updated: Sep 1, 2021 12:15 PM
  • URL: https://guides.zsr.wfu.edu/mla8

Quetext

How to Cite a Blog: MLA, APA, and Chicago Style

  • Posted on September 27, 2023

How to Cite a Blog: MLA, APA, and Chicago Style

The concept of using a blog as an information source for text citation is relatively new. Still, all three central writing style guides have established parameters to ensure bloggers receive proper credit for their work. This article will look at  how to cite a blog  accurately.

Are Blogs Credible Enough to Cite?

Using a blog post as a credible resource for a text citation is a controversial topic. Ideally, when writing, you want all sources to be verifiable and backed by facts, not opinions. There are a few reasons why an entire blog might not be the best option for a reference list.

Authorship for a blog source can be murky. While a blog is attributed to an individual, there is no guarantee that this person authored the blog post in question; there may be a plagiarism issue. Without the author’s identity, it is difficult to verify the issues raised in the posting.

A blog is also operated at the whim of the owner, so if the owner should decide to change or move the post, even remove it entirely, the full citation will be lost. This same  consideration  applies to the accuracy of the blog content. Blog’s are not reviewed for the accuracy of their postings, and using information from a blog that is not verified from a credible source can compromise your credibility.

While blogs provide a source of readily available information about a specific topic, the importance of verifying facts with a trusted source cannot be overstated.

How to Cite a Blog

Proper citation of a blog source is just as essential as a citation for a book or a magazine source. Giving credit to the source of your information is crucial to the integrity of your writing and provides credibility to the statements made. The following three citation styles are all options when accrediting blog authors for their work.

MLA style formatting is named for the Modern Language Association and was first developed in 1883 to “strengthen the study and teaching of language and literature,” according to their website. The organization has a worldwide reach serving over 25,000 members in more than 100 countries.

The association releases several publications per year in language study, including the MLA Handbook, which serves as a writing guide for students. This guide is currently in its 9th edition, focusing on graduate students and professional writers.

Citing a blog as a source using the MLA format  involves  collecting the author name or screen name of the author followed by the title of the post, the name of the blog, and the date of publication and date of viewing. Be sure to include quotation marks, parentheses and square brackets where appropriate. The final product should have this format:

Author’s screen name [Authors real name, if known. Last Name, First Name] “Title of the post.” Name or title of the blog, Publisher (if provided), date of the post using day/month/year, URL, date of access.

When completely assembled, an MLA blog post-citation should look similar to this:

Real McCoy [McCoy, John] “The True Story of the Feud” The Hatfield’s and the McCoy’s,” Pelham Publishing, 17 Nov. 2014, blogs.thehatfieldsandthemccoys.com/thetruestoryofthefeud. Accessed 20 June 2022.

The APA has been publishing its style journal since 1944, which dictates the style and format of papers published in the sciences. APA style format is named after the American Psychological Association, which publishes the style guide and is currently on it’s 7th edition. Citations for academic journal articles and books are written in APA format.

On the surface, the APA style format looks similar to the MLA style, but they were created for different purposes. MLA style was set up for use in art and humanities, and APA was designed to standardize formatting for science and technical journals. Among students, MLA is the more familiar format.

The writer will need much of the same information using APA style formatting, but it is arranged in this slightly different format from the earlier MLA citation. Ensure the correct inclusion of parentheses.

Author’s last name, first initials, (Date of Blog Post year, month day). Title of the blog post. Blog Name. URL

Using the information from the source listed above, an apa citation should look similar to this:

McCoy, J. (2014, November 17). The True Story of the Feud The Hatfields and the McCoys. blogs.thehatfieldsandthemccoys.com/thetruestoryofthefeud

Chicago Style

The University of Chicago first published the Chicago Manual of Style in 1906. This guide focuses on American English and is one of the most widely used style manuals in the United States. CMS is fast becoming the preferred style guideline for history, religion, and philosophy, and it is currently in its 17th edition.

Returning to the source previously cited, a blog citation using Chicago style formatting would look like this:

Authors Last Name, First Name. “Title of Blog Post.” Name of the blog. Date Posted. Accessed Month day year. URL

Using our established blog source with Chicago style, the citation should look like:

McCoy, John. “The True Story of the Feud.” The Hatfields and the McCoy’s. Nov. 17, 2014. Accessed June 20, 2022.

Considerations for Citing a Blog

Under most circumstances, content creators are more than willing to repost their work with a link back to the original page but asking beforehand is key to avoiding unpleasant circumstances later on.

However, using someone else’s copyrighted material for any commercial enterprise without obtaining permission is called copyright infringement, and it’s against the law. Penalties for copyright infringement could cost hundreds of thousands of dollars in fees, along with your reputation.

Using a Citation Generator

A  citation generator  makes it much easier to correctly complete citations in a fraction of the time it would take to complete them manually. Most citation generators will provide a choice of writing style guide and the type of source you are citing.

There are a few citation generators online, and one of the best can be found here at Quetext. Our Quetext citation assistant provides service in ten different languages and gives you the choice of MLA, APA, and Chicago style formats.

Using a  plagiarism checker with a built-in citation generator, gives you the confidence and peace of mind of knowing your work is entirely original and cited correctly every time.

Sign Up for Quetext Today!

Click below to find a pricing plan that fits your needs.

mla citation format blog post

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IMAGES

  1. ️ Mla format video citation. 3 Ways to Cite Images in MLA. 2019-02-10

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  2. MLA: how to cite a blog post [Update 2023]

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  3. 😀 Online source citation mla. Free MLA Format Citation Generator 8th Edition by

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VIDEO

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COMMENTS

  1. How Are Speeches Properly Cited in MLA Format?

    When citing a speech, it may help writers to see the speech as a written work with a title and an author. The author is, of course, the speaker, and like MLA citations of written works, the speaker’s name is listed first, with surname first...

  2. How Do You Block Quote in MLA Format?

    When writing in MLA format, use block quotes for quotes that are more than four lines long by introducing the quote with a colon and indenting the entire quote 1 inch from the left margin and flush to the right margin.

  3. How to Cite Something in MLA Format

    MLA formatting refers to the writing style guide produced by the Modern Language Association. If you’re taking a class in the liberal arts, you usually have to follow this format when writing papers. In addition to looking at MLA examples, ...

  4. How to Cite a Blog Post in MLA

    Author's Last Name, Author's First Name. “Title of Post.” Blog Name, Publisher (only include this information if it is

  5. Blog post

    Works Cited List: Editor, screen name, author, or compiler name (if available). “Posting Title.” Name of Site

  6. MLA Works Cited: Electronic Sources

    Cite web postings as you would a standard web entry. Provide the author of the work, the title of the posting in

  7. MLA: how to cite a blog post [Update 2023]

    How to cite a blog post in MLA · Author(s) name: Give the last name and name as presented in the source (e. g. Watson, John). · Title of the post: Titles are

  8. MLA Citation Guide (MLA 9th Edition): Social Media

    Author's Last Name, First Name or Username if real name not provided. "Title of Blog Post." Name of Blog, Blog Network/Publisher if given, Day Month Year of

  9. Guides: How to reference a Blog in MLA style

    "Title." Blog Title, Day Month Year published, URL. Example: Juliff, Lauren. "Lake Waikaremoana Great Walk: A Complete Guide." Never Ending Footsteps, 13 May

  10. How to Cite a Blog Post in MLA, APA, or Chicago

    Use the following structure to cite a blog post in MLA 9: Author's Last Name, Author's First Name. “Title of Post.” Blog Name, Publisher (only include this

  11. What citation style should I use for my personal blog?

    Note: This post relates to content in the eighth edition of the MLA Handbook. ... Filed Under: blog posts, in-text citations, works-cited lists

  12. MLA Citation Guide (9th Edition): Social Media

    "Title of Blog Post." Name of Blog, Blog Network/Publisher if given, Day Month Year of blog post, URL of blog post. Accessed Day Month Year blog

  13. MLA 8th ed. Style Guide: Web Sites, Blogs

    In general, a citation for information found on the Web should include the following: Author's name (see Corporate Authors)

  14. How to Cite a Blog: MLA, APA, and Chicago Style

    Citing a blog as a source using the MLA format involves ... When completely assembled, an MLA blog post-citation should look similar to this:.