novels and stories

All 60 Original Sherlock Holmes Novels and Stories, Ranked

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Jessica Plummer

Jessica Plummer has lived her whole life in New York City, but she prefers to think of it as Metropolis. Her day job is in books, her side hustle is in books, and she writes books on the side (including a short story in Sword Stone Table from Vintage). She loves running, knitting, and thinking about superheroes, and knows an unnecessary amount of things about Donald Duck. Follow her on Twitter at @jess_plummer .

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As a character in the public domain, Sherlock Holmes has appeared in countless short stories, books, plays, movies, TV shows, comics, and presumably interpretive dances. But I have a soft spot for the original 56 short stories and four novels written by Holmes’s creator, Sir Arthur Conan Doyle. I’ve read the canon all the way through many, many times. I have to admit, though, that while many of the original Holmes stories are rightfully classics, there are some that are, um…not so good.

As a public service, I present to you this definitive ranking of all 60 canonical Sherlock Holmes stories and novels from worst to best. Please note that this list is a matter of opinion, and also that my opinion is always correct, all the time, about everything.

60. The Adventure of the Three Gables

Deeply racist. Pass.

59. The Adventure of Wisteria Lodge

This story is way too long for its flimsy mystery, and profoundly racist besides. Pass.

58. The Sign of the Four

I like Mary and Watson’s courtship and Toby is a very good dog, but the rest of this book is just—you guessed it—appallingly racist.

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57. The Five Orange Pips

This is a story where the KKK murders three people and, well, that’s it, that’s the story. It’s also got a flavor of “What if the KKK went after white people? Wouldn’t that be scary?” Just a tasteless bummer all around.

56. The Adventure of the Mazarin Stone

Extremely boring. Also in third person, for some reason, but losing Watson’s narration drains all the life out of these stories.

55. The Adventure of the Yellow Face

https://www.victorianweb.org/art/illustration/pagets/69.html

54. The Adventure of the Creeping Man

Not to spoil a 97-year-old story but this one is about a guy who is injecting himself with extract of monkey to woo a much younger woman, which, uh, okay. The weirdest part is when Holmes worries that this will lead to a nation of monkey extract addicts.

53. The Adventure of the Sussex Vampire

The later Holmes stories tend to be extremely implausible and silly but this particular one is not improved by the addition of ethnic stereotypes and the inescapably murderous nature of a *checks notes* disabled child.

52. The Adventure of Shoscombe Old Place

The series sadly ends on a bit of a down note, with a story that should be fun—drunken impersonations! midnight crypt desecrations!—but is marred by sinister cross-dressing and some good old fashioned antisemitism.

51. The Adventure of the Crooked Man

This story involves a pet mongoose, but unfortunately that doesn’t really counterbalance all the ableism, so.

50. The Adventure of the Blanched Soldier

Holmes narrates this one, and he flat-out says that it’s not going to be as good as when Watson does it. He’s right.

49. The Man With the Twisted Lip

https://www.victorianweb.org/art/illustration/pagets/88.html

48. The Adventure of the Lion’s Mane

The best of the Watsonless stories, if only because Holmes yells “BEHOLD!” and then kills a jellyfish with a rock.

47. The Adventure of the Speckled Band

The mystery is good, even if snakes don’t work that way, but this story is absolutely riddled with anti-Romani prejudice and the g-slur, and I can’t sign off on that.

46. The Adventure of the Stockbroker’s Clerk

This is less “Holmes solving a mystery” and more “a guy tells Holmes about a weird thing that happened to him, and then they read the explanation of it in the newspaper.” Watson might have been overselling it sometimes, is all I’m saying.

45. The Adventure of the Three Students

This is fine! Holmes makes the brilliant deduction that only a very tall man could see into a very high window! It’s fine!

44. The Adventure of the Red Circle

Holmes cracks the impenetrable code of “some people speak Italian.”

43. The Adventure of Black Peter

https://www.victorianweb.org/art/illustration/pagets/303.html

42. His Last Bow

I’ve always found this story a bit depressing and it suffers from being in third person, but at least Holmes grows a goatee.

41. The Adventure of the Retired Colourman

“What did you do with the bodies?” is one of Holmes’s best mic drop lines, but my favorite part of this story is when Holmes yells at Watson for describing a wall too prettily.

40. The Adventure of the Priory School

The beginning of this story is awesome—a strange man bursts into Holmes’s rooms and promptly topples over in a dead faint—but the rest of it doesn’t live up to that promise. Bonus points for a horse disguised as a cow, though.

39. The Adventure of the Missing Three-Quarter

There’s some clever back volleying and forth with a doctor with a mysterious agenda of his own in this one, but gosh, the end is sad.

38. The Adventure of the Veiled Lodger

The actual mystery here is fairly implausible, although less so given how little Victorians knew how to deal with any animal more exotic than a badger, but the end is so striking in its pathos and Holmes’s helpless compassion that it makes this otherwise rather “ripped from the tabloids!” story quite moving.

37. A Case of Identity

https://www.victorianweb.org/art/illustration/pagets/24.html

36. The Adventure of the Golden Pince-Nez

Holmes solves this mystery by smoking like 20 cigarettes in as many minutes. Were the Victorians right about the medicinal benefits of tobacco after all? (No.)

35. The Adventure of the Resident Patient

This story has fake Russian cataleptics and a lot of Holmes deducing things from cigar ends, both of which are obviously great, but it sort of fizzles out at the end.

34. The Adventure of the Second Stain

Holmes saves England from oopsing into an international conflict. Must be Tuesday.

33. The Adventure of the Bruce-Partington Plans

Really just a retread of “The Second Stain” but with addition of the second cleverest method of disposing of dead bodies in the canon.

32. The Disappearance of Lady Frances Carfax

The actual cleverest method of disposing of dead bodies in the canon.

31. The Problem of Thor Bridge

https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:The_Problem_of_Thor_Bridge_07.jpg

30. The Red-Headed League

A classic! So silly and implausible even Holmes and Watson get the giggles over it; plus, as a redhead myself, I think I’m duty bound to feel a fondness for this one.

29. The Adventure of the Gloria Scott

This is another case of Holmes not actually solving a mystery so much as listening to weird things and then reading an explanation of them written by someone else, but I give it bonus points because it’s his very first case . Baby Holmes! So fresh-faced, so socially awkward! Bless.

28. The Adventure of the Reigate Squire

We get some good (i.e. nonsense) handwriting analysis from Holmes in this one, but I mostly like it because it consists largely of Watson trying to get Holmes to lie down and take a nap before he dies of something Victorian like agitated nerves or Too Much Fresh Air, and Holmes categorically refusing.

27. The Adventure of the Cardboard Box

Any story that begins with severed ears in a box getting mailed to the wrong person has to be good. That’s just science.

26. The Adventure of the Noble Bachelor

Holmes indulging his paternal instincts is charming, even if the Americans’ dialogue in this story suggests that ACD never actually met any Americans, but had them described to him once many years ago by someone who had also never met any, and also everyone involved was drunk. We also get Holmes’s baffling prediction that someday the U.S. and UK will merge to form a giant colonialist super-country, just sort of sprinkled in there for flavor.

25. The Adventure of the Beryl Coronet

https://www.victorianweb.org/art/illustration/pagets/35.html

24. The Adventure of the Engineer’s Thumb

Possibly the goriest Holmes story? I’m discovering an unexpectedly bloodthirsty streak in my nature while making this list, but hey, if we’re solving crimes here, let’s have thumbs be cut off with hatchets every once in a while!

23. The Boscombe Valley Mystery

Good deductive work from Holmes, arrogant bungling from Lestrade, and star-crossed young lovers who get a happy ending. What’s not to like?

22. The Adventure of the Dying Detective

No Holmes is more extra than Holmes pretending to die of a wasting fever, and Holmes is usually pretty extra to start with.

21. The Adventure of the Dancing Men

If you like cryptograms, this story is great. I like cryptograms.

20. The Adventure of the Norwood Builder

This is probably Lestrade at his most dickish, and it’s really entertaining . It’s even more entertaining when Holmes one-ups him.

19. The Adventure of Silver Blaze

https://www.victorianweb.org/art/illustration/pagets/52.html

18. A Study in Scarlet

The first Sherlock Holmes story ever published has a lot to like, including two juicy murders, baby Holmes and Watson meeting for the first time, and the sadly underutilized Baker Street Irregulars. I don’t even so much mind the interminable digression about the sinister, all-encompassing power of, um, Mormons.

17. The Adventure of the Greek Interpreter

Abduction! Fraud! Greek translation! This story has everything, including the first appearance of Holmes’s even smarter brother Mycroft.

16. The Adventure of the Abbey Grange

I always like stories where Holmes walks into a crime with a very obvious solution and shows exactly how that solution is actually set-up, and this is a fine example of the form.

15. The Adventure of the Musgrave Ritual

Now this is the stuff! Baby Holmes + treasure hunt for the crown of the Stuarts + sexy sinister butler + murderous scorned lover + algebra? What more could you ask for???

14. The Adventure of the Blue Carbuncle

A heartwarming holiday story in which Holmes and Watson attempt to trace the origins of a Christmas goose with a purloined precious stone inside it. The whole thing has the general air of a farce, and I mean that in a good way.

13. The Final Problem

https://www.victorianweb.org/art/illustration/pagets/195.html

12. The Adventure of the Empty House

The locked room mystery and dramatic climax of this story are good, but they’re still second fiddle to Holmes coming back to life and Watson literally fainting about it . Just imagine like a hundred praise hands emojis right here.

11. The Naval Treaty

Just fab all around. A twisty little whodunnit, a spirited heroine in Annie Harrison, an opportunity for Holmes to both brawl and be ludicrously melodramatic when he serves the recovered treaty disguised as a breakfast dish , and a hilariously weird digression where he deduces the existence of God from how flowers are pretty. A+!

10. The Adventure of the Six Napoleons

This is such a fun, goofy little mystery, but the highlight is, of course, Lestrade’s speech about how much Scotland Yard respects and admires Holmes and Holmes becoming overcome with emotion.

9. The Adventure of the Devil’s Foot

Like many of the later stories, this one is lurid and implausible, but it gets a relatively high placement for the intense scene where Holmes and Watson deliberately give themselves a bad trip and then lie on the grass talking about how much they love each other.

8. The Adventure of the Solitary Cyclist

The titular cyclist, Violet Smith, is admirably spunky and I like to see Watson getting some solo detective work in in this story, even if he bungles it. Plus, Holmes wins a fist fight! Mostly, though, “You’re too late! She’s my wife.” “No, she’s your widow” is a baller exchange.

7. The Adventure of the Copper Beeches

https://www.victorianweb.org/art/illustration/pagets/41.html

6. The Adventure of the Illustrious Client

The drama . A murderous attack on Holmes, vitriol-throwing, a Cruel Intentions –style diary of sin! ACD didn’t hold back on this one, and lord love him for it.

5. The Valley of Fear

Valley does the same thing as Scarlet , where there’s a whole separate novel plunked in halfway through—Pinkertons vs. Freemasons this time, because why not—but I really dig that second novel so I’ll allow it.

4. A Scandal in Bohemia

I’m on the record as stating that I think Irene Adler’s influence in adaptations is disproportionate to her original canon page time, but that doesn’t change the fact that she’s a badass. She outsmarts Sherlock Holmes! Plus we get not one but two Holmes disguises, always a plus.

3. The Adventure of Charles Augustus Milverton

THIS IS WHAT I’M TALKING ABOUT!!! Dastardly blackmailers, vengeful ladies in disguise, Watson putting his underutilized arts and crafts skills to criminal ends! Holmes solves exactly zero mysteries in this story but who cares when he’s breathing heavily into Watson’s ear behind a curtain while a noblewoman murders a scoundrel? Not me, that’s who!

2. The Adventure of the Three Garridebs

“It was worth a wound—it was worth many wounds—to know the depth of loyalty and love which lay behind that cold mask. The clear, hard eyes were dimmed for a moment, and the firm lips were shaking. For the one and only time I caught a glimpse of a great heart as well as a great brain. All my years of humble but single-minded service culminated in that moment of revelation.”

And that’s all I have to say about that.

1. The Hound of the Baskervilles

https://www.victorianweb.org/art/illustration/pagets/249.html

So what do you think? Am I right? (Of course I am.) Tell us your favorite Sherlock Holmes story, canon or not, on social!

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Sherlock Holmes books in order

Looking for the Sherlock Holmes books in order? We’ve got you covered with this complete list of stories starring the most famous detective in the world!

After I read and loved my first Agatha Christie book , my dad decided to hand me The Complete Works of Sherlock Holmes. I was so intimidated by the gigantic tome. I thought I would never finish them all.

Little did I know, that Sir Arthur Conan Doyle only wrote four Sherlock Holmes novels. The remaining works are all short stories! 56 short stories to be exact. A much more manageable task than I initially thought.

Since the day my dad gave them to me, I have stayed enamored with Sherlock Holmes novels and stories. I adore a good Sherlock Holmes retelling and the new movie and tv adaptations have brought me so much joy.

Equally as exciting is the fact that on my son’s 11th birthday, my dad gave him his very own copy of Sherlock Holmes. It took him about 6 months to finish the Sherlock Holmes books between his other novels. It’s truly become a family tradition at this point.

I’m delighted to lay out this post of Sherlock Holmes books in order and I’ve decided to share my 10 favorite stories as well as Sir Arthur’s favorites. These stories are a great jumping-off point for anyone new to Sir Arthur Conan Doyle’s beloved series.

*Sherlock Holmes Books in Order post contains affiliate links. Purchases made through links result in a small commission to us at no cost to you.

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Table of Contents

Who was Sir Arthur Conan Doyle?

Sir Arthur Conan Doyle was, like Sherlock Holmes, a man of many talents. He was a physician who later specialized in ophthalmology, a sportsman (he enjoyed soccer, cricket, skiing, golf, and practiced riflery and boxing,) and a father of 5. He also had a brief stint in politics, was an amateur architect, and was a legal advocate.

Sir Arthur Conan Doyle was most well known for being a prolific writer having penned 4 Sherlock Holmes Novels and 56 short stories alone. In addition to the famous detective stories, he wrote fantasy and sci-fi tales as well.

He was born on May 22, 1859, and passed away on July 7, 1930, at the age of 71.

Sherlock Holmes Novels and Short Stories in Order

The Sherlock Holmes short stories were originally written for various magazines but were later grouped into book collections. For our categorization purposes, we’ve separated the novels from the short stories. We’ve also listed the stories under the name of the collection each can be found within.

Below, you’ll see that we only linked the novels and the short story collections. Each short story costs the same amount as a collection of 12+ stories, so it doesn’t make sense to get them each individually. In truth, the best bang for your buck would be to just get the complete Sherlock Holmes Collection which includes all 60 novels and short stories.

Sherlock Holmes

The Complete Sherlock Holmes Collection by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle

I am a HUGE detective story lover and no one does detective stories better than Sir Arthur Conan Doyle. Sherlock Holmes’ ability to solve the crime is fascinating. His observations are astute and I can never, ever guess who committed the crime. If you are looking for the best mystery books of all time, Sherlock Holmes cannot be missed.

Again, love all the various adaptions of this series, but Sherlock on the BBC is my absolute favorite.  ( Narrated by Stephen Fry – the British narrator of the Harry Potter series and Mycroft Holmes in one of the adaptations. )

Find this book in Sherlock Holmes Books / Literary Classics / Best Mystery Books / British Mysteries

Sherlock Holmes Books in Order

  • A Study in Scarlet (1887)
  • The Sign of Four (1890)
  • The Hound of the Baskervilles (1902)
  • The Valley of Fear (1915)

Sherlock Holmes Short Stories in Order

  • A Scandal in Bohemia (June 1891)
  • The Red-Headed League (August 1891)
  • A Case of Identity (September 1891)
  • The Boscombe Valley Mystery (October 1891)
  • The Five Orange Pips (November 1891)
  • The Man with the Twisted Lip (December 1891)
  • The Adventure of the Blue Carbuncle (January 1892)
  • The Adventure of the Speckled Band (February 1892)
  • The Adventure of the Engineer’s Thumb (March 1892)
  • The Adventure of the Noble Bachelor (April 1892)
  • The Adventure of the Beryl Coronet (May 1892)
  • The Adventure of the Copper Beeches (June 1892)
  • Silver Blaze (December 1892)
  • The Adventure of the Cardboard Box (January 1893)
  • The Adventure of the Yellow Face (February 1893)
  • The Adventure of the Stockbroker’s Clerk (March 1893)
  • The Adventure of the Gloria Scott (April 1893)
  • The Adventure of the Musgrave Ritual (May 1893)
  • The Adventure of the Reigate Squires (June 1893)
  • The Adventure of the Crooked Man (July 1893)
  • The Adventure of the Resident Patient  (August 1893)
  • The Adventure of the Greek Interpreter (September 1893)
  • The Adventure of the Naval Treaty (October–November 1893)
  • The Final Problem (December 1893)
  • The Adventure of the Empty House (October 1903)
  • The Adventure of the Norwood Builder (November 1903)
  • The Adventure of the Dancing Men (December 1903)
  • The Adventure of the Solitary Cyclist (January 1904)
  • The Adventure of the Priory School (February 1904)
  • The Adventure of Black Peter (March 1904)
  • The Adventure of Charles Augustus Milverton (April 1904)
  • The Adventure of the Six Napoleons (May 1904)
  • The Adventure of the Three Students (June 1904)
  • The Adventure of the Golden Pince-Nez (July 1904)
  • The Adventure of the Missing Three-Quarter (August 1904)
  • The Adventure of the Abbey Grange (September 1904)
  • The Adventure of the Second Stain (December 1904)
  • The Adventure of the Cardboard Box (1893)*
  • The Adventure of Wisteria Lodge (1908)
  • The Adventure of the Bruce-Partington Plans (1908)
  • The Adventure of the Devil’s Foot (1910)
  • The Disappearance of Lady Frances Carfax (1911)
  • The Adventure of the Red Circle (1911)
  • The Adventure of the Dying Detective (1913)
  • His Last Bow (1917)
  • The Adventure of the Mazarin Stone (1921)
  • The Problem of Thor Bridge (1922)
  • The Adventure of the Creeping Man (1923)
  • The Adventure of the Illustrious Client (1924)
  • The Adventure of the Sussex Vampire (1924)
  • The Adventure of the Three Garridebs (1924)
  • The Adventure of the Blanched Soldier (1926)
  • The Adventure of the Three Gables (1926)
  • The Adventure of the Lion’s Mane (1926)
  • The Adventure of the Retired Colourman (1926)
  • The Adventure of the Veiled Lodger (1927)
  • The Adventure of Shoscombe Old Place (1927)

* This story sometimes appears in The Memoirs of Sherlock Holmes

Sir Arthur Conan Doyle’s Favorite Sherlock Holmes Stories

In 1927 Sir Arthur Doyle made a list of his personal favorite Holmes stories as part of a competition. The list of his selections is below.

  • The Speckled Band
  • The Red-Headed League
  • The Dancing Men
  • The Final Problem
  • A Scandal in Bohemia
  • The Empty House
  • The Five Orange Pips
  • The Second Stain
  • The Devil’s Foot
  • The Priory School
  • The Musgrave Ritual
  • The Reigate Squires

10 Best Sherlock Holmes Books and Stories

Now for my rankings. You’ll notice that most of these stories are earlier works. Sir Arthur Conan Doyle killed off Sherlock Holmes in The Final Problem because he didn’t wait to continue the series. He resurrected him when the public demanded more stories, but I just don’t think the author’s heart was in them anymore. Do you agree?

a study in scarlet

A Study in Scarlet by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle

Stand Alone Novel

This book is on top of my list because it’s the very first Sherlock Holmes novel and it tells the origin story of Dr. Watson and Sherlock Holmes. It details how Dr. Watson came to live at 221B Baker Street with Sherlock and sets him up as the narrator for all his adventures.

During the mystery within, readers are also introduced to Scotland Yard Inspectors Lestrade and Gregson. Together, Watson and Holmes tackle the murder of Enoch Drebber which includes the famous “Rache” clue.

The adventures of sherlock holmes

The Adventure of the Speckled Band by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle

Within The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes

This is my son’s favorite of the Sherlock Holmes stories and one that stands out in my mind the most clearly. Why? Because I’m pretty sure the solution to this locked room murder mystery is what started a certain phobia of mine. (I won’t tell you because I don’t want to spoil the ending!)

A Scandal in Bohemia by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle

If you’ve seen any modern adaptation of Sherlock Holmes you are familiar with Irene Adler. She’s often described as the only woman who outsmarted Sherlock and is often portrayed as his love interest. But she was only in one story! While mentioned a few other times in the series, if you want to see Irene in action, you need to read this tale.

Sign of four

The Sign of Four by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle

The Sign of Four is one mystery that sees Watson get a happy ending. A woman named Mary begins receiving mysterious pearls and she isn’t sure why. As Holmes and Watson work on the case, Dr. Watson and Mary fall in love and eventually get engaged.

hound of the baskervilles

The Hound of the Baskervilles by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle

Often considered the best of the Sherlock Holmes novels, this is probably Sherlock’s most famous case. Set in Dartmoor, the eerie setting and supernatural dog in the story make this crime fiction feel more like a horror.

Sherlock has been set to Devon to figure out if the myth of the demonic hound of Baskerville is real and if it’s coming for the heirs to Baskerville Hall.

his last bow

His Last Bow by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle

Within His Last Bow

While not the last Sherlock Holmes story to be written, this short story is the last chronologically. It shows Holmes’s coming out of retirement in the country where he is a beekeeper, to catch spies during WWI.

I particularly like it because it’s the story that inspired my favorite Sherlock Holmes retelling, Laurie King’s The Beekeeper’s Apprentice.

The Red-Headed League by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle

This is such an original story that even Sir Arthur listed it as one of his favorites. It’s about a man who was employed by the red-headed league for a short period before finding out no such league existed. He’s confused and goes to Holmes for help.

the memoirs of sherlock holmes

The Adventure of the Greek Interpreter by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle

Within The Memoirs of Sherlock Holmes

Did you know that Sherlock has an older brother? This Sherlock Holmes story introduces readers to Mycroft Holmes, who works for the English government. Watson and Holmes get to visit the famed Diogenes Club in this book too!

Mycroft’s deductive skills are even better than Holmes’s although in this story, he requires Sherlock’s help.

The Final Problem by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle

Sir Arthur Conan Doyle famously tried to kill off Sherlock Holmes during this story, only to bring him back later after significant public pressure. Holmes explains to Watson that he thinks a criminal mastermind is behind a slew of cases – enter James Moriarty, the fight at Reichenbach Falls in Switzerland, and Holmes’s attempted demise.

The Adventure of the Blue Carbuncle by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle

What always struck me about the Sherlock Holmes stories is the clever way a new case is discovered. In this case, it was a valuable gemstone found within the body of a goose. That image has stayed with me all these years because it’s such a unique premise to launch a mystery.

Sherlock Holmes Books Merch

If you love the Dr. Watson and Sherlock Holmes stories, we think you’ll be a fan of this fun merchandise inspired by the books.

Who Is Sir Arthur Conan Doyle?

Sir Arthur Conan Doyle was a doctor and writer most well-known for his series of detective books and stories about Sherlock Holmes and Dr. Watson.

How many Sherlock Holmes stories are there?

There are 4 full-length Sherlock Holmes novels and 56 short stories compiled in 5 short story collections.

Should I Read the Sherlock Holmes Books in Order?

It doesn’t matter what order you read the Sherlock Holmes books and series in, although we recommend starting with A Study in Scarlet because it establishes how Holmes and Dr. Watson meet.

Did Sir Arthur Conan Doyle write other books and stories?

Yes! Sir Arthur Conan Doyle also wrote fantasy and science fiction stories, though his Sherlock Holmes stories are what he is remembered for.

Did you read the Sherlock Holmes Book in Order?

Sherlock Holmes Retellings

12 Sherlock Holmes Fiction Books and Retellings Watson Would Love

If you loved Sherlock Holmes novels, you need to check out these retellings!

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Looking for more books like Sherlock Holmes? These detective novels are perfect!

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The Ultimate List of Mystery Books

Love Sherlock Holmes Books? We created this list and carefully divided it by sub-genre for anyone who lives a good mystery as much as we do.

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Shirley Jackson: Novels and Stories (The Lottery / The Haunting of Hill House / We Have Always Lived in the Castle)

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Shirley Jackson

Shirley Jackson: Novels and Stories (The Lottery / The Haunting of Hill House / We Have Always Lived in the Castle) Hardcover – May 27, 2010

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  • Print length 832 pages
  • Language English
  • Publisher Library of America
  • Publication date May 27, 2010
  • Dimensions 5.13 x 1.09 x 8.08 inches
  • ISBN-10 1598530720
  • ISBN-13 978-1598530728
  • See all details

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Shirley Jackson: Novels and Stories (The Lottery / The Haunting of Hill House / We Have Always Lived in the Castle)

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About the author, product details.

  • Publisher ‏ : ‎ Library of America; First Ed Thus edition (May 27, 2010)
  • Language ‏ : ‎ English
  • Hardcover ‏ : ‎ 832 pages
  • ISBN-10 ‏ : ‎ 1598530720
  • ISBN-13 ‏ : ‎ 978-1598530728
  • Item Weight ‏ : ‎ 1.22 pounds
  • Dimensions ‏ : ‎ 5.13 x 1.09 x 8.08 inches
  • #353 in Short Stories Anthologies
  • #943 in Short Stories (Books)
  • #2,999 in Literary Fiction (Books)

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About the author

novels and stories

Shirley Jackson

Shirley Jackson was born in San Francisco in 1916. She first received wide critical acclaim for her short story "The Lottery," which was published in 1948. Her novels--which include The Sundial, The Bird's Nest, Hangsaman, The Road through the Wall, We Have Always Lived in the Castle and The Haunting of Hill House--are characterized by her use of realistic settings for tales that often involve elements of horror and the occult. Raising Demons and Life Among the Savages are her two works of nonfiction. Come Along With Me is a collection of stories, lectures, and part of the novel she was working on when she died in 1965. All are currently in print (Penguin). Two posthumous volumes of her short fiction are Just An Ordinary Day (Bantam) and Let Me Tell You (Random House). A graphic novel adaptation of "The Lottery" by Miles Hyman, her grandson, was published in 2016 (Farrar-Straus-Giroux). Also in 2016: Dark Tales by Shirley Jackson (Penguin Classics) and an authorized biography by Ruth Franklin: Shirley Jackson: A Rather Haunted Life (Norton).

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